What To Have Students Put On A Name Tent

Week 1 Day 1 – Name Tents with Feedback

106UPDATE The month of May 2020: Remote/Distance/eLearning has ushered in a new era of teachers who have stepped up to modify this exercise for use when they are not in their classrooms with their pupils. If their ideas pique your interest, continue reading to the bottom of this piece to see more and to find links to the work they have done. Last year, I had the opportunity to teach Advanced Algebra (also known as Alg 2 or Alg/Trig) at a school that was new to me. I was wise in that I went into the year relying on the knowledge of people who had recently taught Adv Alg in the previous year (for me it had been 11 years ago).

I’ve had a lot of first days of school in my professional life, but I’m confident that I can learn even more.

It was her explanation that she utilizes name tents and that during the first week of school, she writes a brief message for each pupil reacting to whatever they have written within the name tent.

We must establish personal connections with pupils.

  1. Students improve more as a result of feedback rather than a numerical or letter grade.
  2. We must ensure that our classrooms are welcoming environments for all students.
  3. Morgan’s objectives for the first week are simple: to establish relationships with her pupils and to foster a sense of community among the entire class.
  4. My very first slide of class on the first day of school last year in our High School Math Classrooms was shown here on the screen.
  5. I instructed pupils to write their initial name on both sides of the paper.
  6. (Please notice that I have modified it somewhat for this year and have linked it lower down in the post): NameTentFeedback This document is an exact copy of the Word document Morgan sent to me.
  7. Tonya Hodge, one of our school’s AVID leaders, gave this to Morgan as a thank you gift (a ELA teacher).

My request was for them to introduce themselves to the folks with whom they were seated.

This was their first task for the first week of class.

My class consisted of pupils in the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades.

Morgan’s and my objective for the first week was to establish a community of math learners.

As an aside: The process of establishing a sense of community during the first week of school is fairly frequent in middle school; however, it has not been my experience that this is as common in high school mathematics courses.

We continued with our activities from the previous day.

AA The first day of school was a slog.

An additional portion of my day 1 lecture was posted about HERE the day before.

They did so well.

When we were down to the final five minutes of class, I finally got the students to open their name tents and write me a letter in the yellow highlighted box about anything they wanted to about day one.

That afternoon, I composed a response to each and every kid in my class using a response template.

I enjoy the wide range of answers I receive from my pupils.

I made a point of spending 1-2 minutes every day reading what every pupil was thinking and responding to it.

Not only did it assist me in memorizing names even more quickly, but it also provided me with valuable information about my students and their relationship to my class.

Here are a number of things I discovered after implementing name tents in my high school mathematics classroom during the first week of school.

  1. I have homework tasks that I offer to students during the first week of school that require them to write a great deal more about themselves. This does not take the place of them, but it was an excellent addition. With the extra benefit of being able to provide fast response to pupils
  2. After three days of receiving the prompt “comments,” some students were writing very little or just saying something like “It was OK.” During the last minute of class on day 4, I encouraged students to “Ask me a question” instead of making a remark, and I promised to answer any questions they had regarding the class or about myself personally. This was a huge success. I received a large number of excellent questions. I tried to be as honest as possible in my responses to everyone. As an added bonus, I posted some questions on the board for the whole class to see, allowing everyone to obtain feedback on what their peers were asking of me. I’ve created a new and improved Name Tent for this year’s first week of school (see the bottom of this page for more information), which includes the opportunity for kids to ask me questions. Here are some of the questions that students have posed to me. I adore them
  3. Despite reading and replying to kids on a daily basis with what they wrote in their name tents, I was still missing hints that they were sending me. When I went back to the name tents to write this piece, I found some information that my kids had supplied me but that I had overlooked. Consider the following image of the inside of this student’s tent: This was the exterior rear of his tent, and it was very stunning: What I now know about this kid, having missed the first week of class, is that he performed best in math class when we were engaged in more creative activities. This kid completed the least amount of homework and classwork of any student I had this year until about two-thirds of the way through the year, when I completed my Desmos Art Project, and he produced the following in 24 hours: Having reflected on the situation, I wish I had taken notice of his outstanding doodles in week 1 and utilized this as a signal to develop lessons that would engage him sooner. This is something I intend to alter — this year. The name tent this year has been modified to promote sketching instead of replying to me
  4. I understand that many people reading this may say, “Sara, name tents are fantastic, but I just do not have time to put them together.” To give you some hope, I can assure you that the time I invested in them was completely worthwhile. While teaching full-time during the first week of school last year, I would also leave school each day to attend the Minnesota State Fair and work at our Math On-a-Stick exhibit in the evenings, which was a great experience. I had a lot on my plate. I went ahead and did it anyhow, and I’m so pleased I did. In order to hear daily from every student AND for you to give them feedback, I HIGHLY encourage you to consider using these name tents OR doing something else during week 1
  5. I did read my name tents again at the end of September once I got to know my students a little better and I learned a great deal more. This is something I intend to do again this year. If I can figure out a method to do something similar to garner more student comments like this in October or November of this year, I would. For example, every day during week 1 I spent time (5 minutes) making students remember EVERY first name of every kid in the class In fact, I put them to the test on it the next week. Every day, I asked 1-2 groups to step up and introduce themselves to the rest of the class. By day 6, I would estimate that 60 percent of my pupils knew every name, and another 35 percent knew at least 80 percent or more of the names. It fostered a strong sense of camaraderie in the classroom. Later in the first quarter, students expressed their gratitude for the fact that other students recognized their names.

I’d love to know what you do to establish relationships with your math students during the first week of school. What procedures do you use to provide feedback to students? How do you foster a sense of belonging in your classroom? These are some of the most essential objectives I have for the first week of the year. I’m always on the lookout for new inspiration. Wishing you a successful start to the academic year. The NEW and IMPROVED Name Tent for 2016-17 is as follows: Identify the tent for the first week.

  • You may obtain a copy of it by visiting this link: Tentative names for the first week (name tents in french) FIRST UPDATE: August 1, 2019: I’m frequently asked about suggestions for name tent prompts.
  • People on Twitter have offered a plethora of prompts, which may be useful to those looking for ideas.
  • The first of 100 prompts for name tents from Kristen Fouss, presented as an agoogle slide show.
  • Here’s what Jennifer White had to say on Twitter: “If mathematics were a creature, it would be.
  • Jennifer White (@JennSWhite) is a social media influencer.
  • “Can you give me any advice?” After Chris Nho (who is really incredible) raised this question online, I decided to ask the themtbos community.
  • This is a question that I’ve heard from a number of folks this week.
  • Sara VanDerWerf (@saravdwerf) is a social media influencer.
  • Here’s what you’ve been waiting for.
  • Tent is known for its Spanish name (word doc) UPDATE 4 September 2019: Mary Bourassa wrote a blog post about the need of continuing the debate.

A frequently asked question concerning name tents that I receive over the internet. Check out Mary’s answer by clicking HERE. 5th May, 2020: UPDATE: Because of COVID-19, the world has changed, and so must our approach to using Name Tents. Take a look at these resources.

  1. Kristen Fouss has added Name Tents to Desmos so that she may provide feedback to her pupils through the use of this tool. Thank you to Desmos and Kristen for making suggestions to improve the concepts presented in this post. Check out what Kristen created on Desmos HERE (you may duplicate and adapt her work), and read the responses she received when she shared her work on FACEBOOK. Additionally, here are 100 prompts that others have compiled for you to utilize
  2. My friend Erica Heinzman in San Diego contributed her Google version of the form HERE, which you can get HERE.

Here’s a picture of my Google name tent. Even after we’ve completed the five rounds, Ss may sometimes email me with a “Name Tent” entry. Erica Heinzman (@eheinzman1) will be born on May 22, 2020.

  1. Several of you answered with suggestions for how to customize Name Tents using Google resources within Google Classroom after Nanette Johnson requested for help. Take a look at it here:

Mrs. Johnson and I were talking about how to begin to develop a culture and connections with and among kids when we came up with the idea for this post. We brought up @saravdwerf’s name tents, and I was under the impression that you had come up with a variation to be used digitally. Is that accurate? Is iteachmathideas an MTBoS? pic.twitter.com/3LtCFaoICR Nanette Johnson (@Math m Addicts) is a math addict who uses Twitter. The date is May 21, 2020. The Idea below was published before to COVID-19, but I was impressed with how they altered the form.

Thanks to the efforts of your department, your Name Tents now resemble a text messaging exchange.

iteachmath The 30th of January 2020 will be marked by MTBoS Idil A.

Name Tent Activity For The First Day Of School + Free Template

Making a name tent on the first day of school is an easy foldable activity that allows students to get to know one another while also building classroom community. This back-to-school exercise is perfect for when your children are walking into their first classroom setting. On the first day of school, it helps to keep the class focused while welcoming parents or new students in the hall. Consider incorporating these desk name tents into your classroom’s first day of school festivities if you’re looking for ideas for first day of school activities.

See also:  Which Roof Rack For Smittybilt Tent

Name Tent Directions

A name tent is a piece of paper that has been folded in two. The students write their names in the centre of the front side, and then write something about themselves in each corner of the front side as well.

Name Tent Ideas for the Classroom

However, by utilizing a name tent as a communication tool on those first few days of school, it may be put to far greater use. Writing to one another is an excellent approach to foster a sense of community in the classroom. To begin, create three columns. Then, identify each column with the date, the day of the week, the student reflection, and the response from the instructor. After that, build five rows and identify each row with the day of the week that it is. On the left-hand side, there is a spot for your children to jot down their reactions to their days for a week.

Instruct the children to share whatever they find interesting with you.

  1. I’m curious how you felt about today
  2. What was your first impression as you walked into the classroom? What information do you want me to have about you? What did you take away from today’s lesson about your instructor or classmates? What did you take away from the experience? What was your favorite recreational activity? Do you wish we had more time to do the things we want to do? What do you hope to accomplish this year
  3. What are your goals? What actions would you have like to have carried out differently? Do you have a positive attitude for this school year? What are you looking forward to the most this school year, and why?

When you use this variation on name tents in the classroom, you may gain valuable information into how well your new students are getting to know one another as well as the effectiveness of each activity scheduled for the first week of school.

Name Tent Template Freebie for the Classroom

In the classroom, there are two methods to go about putting names on tents. One method is to download the name tent template and print out copies for each student in your class. The second method is to hand out blank sheets of paper and have your children fill them up. Whatever choice you pick, let your children to have fun decorating their name tents and making them as one-of-a-kind as they are themselves. Wishing you all the best on your first day of school.

The First Day of School doesn’t have to be Boring

Greetings, dear friend. Is it actually occurring yet? Are you starting to have visions of the first day of school in your head? It’s an odd day, to say the least. Many things were only getting started. While this may be true, it is a strange type of educational netherworld in that no one is expected to complete actual work or engage in genuine dialogues just yet. After many years of August anguish, I’d want to save you the years of August agony that I went through by sharing some methods in this post that will help you turn your first day of school into an opportunity to establish the creative, engaging, and powerful tone you want for the rest of the year.

  1. Hold for a second, did I just overhear you chuckle?
  2. As a result, what should you do on the first day of school?
  3. In fact, syllabuses must be provided; yet, given the fact that pupils have not studied any material or prepared in any manner for class, what more can a creative instructor do?
  4. Make Attendance a Fun Experience Attendance may be a real pain in the neck.
  5. That’s why I inverted it to make it more of a get-to-know-you exercise instead.
  6. As an alternative to replying with “here,” when I call a student’s name, he or she will react with a short response to my inquiry.

By the conclusion of attendance, we’ve all learned a little more about one another and had a lot more fun than we would have had if we’d just kept hearing the word “here.” Click here to download a free printable poster of questions that you may keep on your desk and utilize throughout the year.

  1. Create a Scavenger Hunt in your classroom.
  2. Perhaps you have a bulletin board for writing contests, a collection of maker materials, a costume area, an outdoor reading library, a binder of make-up materials, a collection of art supplies, a homework inbox, or other such resources.
  3. Prizes wouldn’t be detrimental in any way.
  4. Students should be arranged in a logical manner.

A interesting variation on this is to get to know your students by assigning them to different areas of the classroom. Give a set of instructions, such as the following:

  • “If you prefer studying English and history, go to this side of the room
  • If you prefer studying math and science, go to this side of the room.”
  • “Go to this side if you are an only child
  • Go to this side if you have siblings.”
  • “Go toward this corner if you prefer reading fantasy for fun, this corner for mystery, this corner for love stories, this corner for nonfiction.”

Continue to ask follow-up questions as your pupils are walking around the room. For example, you might ask students who they believe has the greatest number of siblings and obtain a few names and numbers, or you could ask multiple students to discuss their favorite book from the genre they have selected. For anyone interested in my handouts for this specific exercise, you can find them at the link provided. Demonstrate the strength and importance of a sense of belonging. The Summer Humanities Institute at Phillips Exeter Academy provided me with this first-day technique, which I used during my time there.

  1. If you want to encourage students to appreciate their own and each other’s points of view as much as your own throughout the year, this is a fantastic approach to introduce the concept to them at the beginning of the year.
  2. Inform them that the second-to-last person will bring the narrative to a close, and that the very last person will be responsible for retelling the entire story, but that everyone may contribute to the process.
  3. It’s going to be a fantastic narrative.
  4. It is likely that the final person will be concerned at first but will rapidly become soothed by the assistance that will come from all directions in remembering all of the tiny things.
  5. Encourage them to recognize how rich and great the narrative they made together was, and how much it benefited the last person who heard it because they all worked together on recreating it.
  6. Concentrate on what this means for group discussions, group work, workshops, partner collaborations, and other activities that will take place.
  7. Allow your students to tell you what is important on your syllabus.

Whatever framework you use to organize your course, the first day is a sensible moment to distribute it.

Distribute your papers to your students in pairs, and ask them to select the three most essential points they believe are present in each of the papers.

Alternatively, have everyone select only one key point and then call on partners at random to explain what they believe to be the most important.

By doing so, you immediately establish a tone for active learning, and, perhaps even more significantly for you, you prevent the horrible, horrific experience I refer to as “the glazing,” in which your pupils just cease to see and hear you.

Simply sign up for the free download and then enter your own information for a quick and easy, aesthetically designed syllabus to be created in minutes.

This first-day activity is one of my favorites.

On the bottom half of a piece of card stock, I print the name of each student in a huge font size in the bottom half of the paper.

I hand them out and instruct everyone to fold them into table tent name cards, which they will then place on their workstations.

For each student, I ask them to create a few pictures or write a few lines and quotations to represent themselves in class.

I examine these photographs, and I can always remember the names of my pupils within forty-eight hours (whereas previously, I would have struggled for weeks!).

I hope you enjoy it!

The pupils will learn more about one another and you will have a better understanding of them each time the cards are used in this manner.

I just place the name cards wherever I want them before students arrive, and they sit where their name cards are located._ I hope that these activities will assist you in getting your year off to a fantastic start.

As a result, I hope you would consider sharing your successes, motivation, and problems with our expanding community over at inCreative High School English on Facebook.

The Easiest Way to Learn Student Names (in person or across distance)

Every year, I used to have trouble coming up with names. And I was quite disappointed in myself. On the first day of class, I would be overjoyed to greet my new students and share my intentions for a productive start, but I would spend the next few days stressing over pronunciation and double-checking my recollection whenever I needed to call on someone. That is no longer the case. You may learn students’ names on the first night of school in a straightforward manner. This method is suitable for use whether students begin the school year in person or via distance learning.

  • (Are you in a hurry?
  • If you’d like to simply have the curriculum for this activity, you can get it here.
  • I prefer to create these name tents as one-pagers, so that kids have a pattern to follow with designated spots for each feature.
  • On the internet, you may learn names.
  • Simply set up the project as a Google Slide to begin working on it.
  • It’ll then be screenshotted and dropped into a picture of themselves before being sent to you, giving you nearly the exact same snapshot that you would have had to learn from if you’d taken a photo of them in class.
  • As you can see, with any approach, you have the opportunity to begin to get to know each pupil, as well as to learn their first and last names.

Simple Steps to Take Brainstorm: Consider what information you’d like to know about your pupils from the beginning.

Examples of such elements include: Create a template by doing the following: You may utilize the lower half of a Powerpoint slide for in-person presentations (so you can fold it later).

Simply use the shapes tool to construct boxes that contain anything you want them to contain, and then delete them.

If you instruct them to “Include your three favorite novels in the top lefthand box,” they will know what to do.

Print the name tents on cardstock (instructions on the top half, template on the bottom so it will show when they are folded) and distribute it to them.

Take pictures of each student with their card to use as study aids later on, and leave the cards out for at least the first week to create a simple and adaptable seating plan that can be changed each day.

Finally, throughout the year, substitute teachers can utilize the name tents to swiftly divide kids into small groups before they come on group work days.

See also:  How Many Square Meters In A 4X4 Grow Tent

As an example, show them a model that you’ve created.

At the end of the process, have them upload a selfie as well as their name card to a collaborative Google slide presentation for the entire class.

Having the ability to connect names to faces from the beginning will help you be significantly better prepared for the return to school, whenever that may occur.

I hope you found this information useful!

If you’d want this curriculum to be tailored specifically to your needs, you can find it here.

Do you want to keep this in mind for later? It’s perfect for your back-to-school bulletin board! Are you looking for more innovative ideas to use in your classroom? Subscribe to the Spark Creativity Teacher Podcast on iTunes or Google Play. or come hang out with me on Instagram and say hi!

I’m Betsy

I’ll assist you in discovering innovative ELA tactics that will bring life to your classroom. Prepare yourself for a wonderful teaching experience! SEEK OUT THE STRATEGY OF YOUR DREAMS, OR DIVE INTO ONE OF THESE POPULAR CREATIVE RABBIT HOLES FOR INSPIRATIONAL INSIGHT. Do you need something fantastic for tomorrow? Go to the free resources area to find out more.

Name Tents

  • Rooms with desks that are too small for name tents will need 8.5 x 11 inch card board paper or blank clip-on badges. Sharpies® or other markers will be needed.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Distribute card stock and markers to the participants. You and the students should fold a piece of paper in half lengthwise and print their first and last names on the front and back of the cardstock
  2. Cards can be embellished as long as the name is clearly visible
  3. Nevertheless, At the beginning of class, name tents are set in front of each student. Everyone’s name should be pronounced correctly
  4. Tents should be collected at the conclusion of class and brought to each meeting. Carry a few extra cards to each lesson in case any kids inadvertently take one home.

PREFERRED PRONOUNS

The first day of school may be a thrilling moment for both instructors and children, but it can also be a stressful time for both parties. On the first day of school, what can you do to ensure that your students (and yourself!) feel at ease in the classroom? Note: Some of the links below are affiliate connections. For additional information, please see my complete disclosure policy. Check out these 20 sure-fire ideas to ensure that your first day back to school is a success! Continue reading the comments to discover even more suggestions!

1. Read First Day Jitters by Julie Danneburg

The Very First Day Jittersis a fantastic book to use as an icebreaker with your pupils. Serve it with Jitter Juice to make it even more spectacular! Then ask students to write YOU a letter in which they explain why they believe you should not be scared. It will get people thinking about their own nervousness, and they may be able to support each other as a result of this.

2. Do a classroom or school tour

Show your students where all of the classroom resources are located and assist them in understanding which places are for them and which ones are solely for you. Students who have just started at the school? Take them around the building and show them where the restrooms, the gym, the cafeteria, and other amenities are located. Instruct them about the computer lab’s rules and procedures, as well as lunchtime protocols. Include a scavenger hunt, and you’ve got yourself a day full of excitement!

Take a look at this blog article for some excellent tips on how to improve your map abilities.

3. Make a picture keepsake

Don’t let this one slip your mind! To commemorate the end of the school year, photograph each kid on their first day back to school and on their last day of school. At the end of the year, you may turn it into a souvenir. Better better, let students to draw a self-portrait on the first day of class and then again on the end day of class. Compare! They could have changed, and their artistic abilities will almost certainly have altered as well!

4. One-on-one time

Spend a few minutes with each student in a one-on-one setting. Get to know them, introduce yourself, laugh with them, and urge them to do their best. It is critical to establish a personal connection on the first day of class!

5. Back to School Craftivity

Are you prepared for some rest at the conclusion of the first day? It’s possible that you’ll require some as well! This is one of my favorite things to do on the first day of school since it allows me to be creative. It enables the children to unwind while remaining productive at the same time.

Students explain about themselves, learn the rules, reflect on their day, and consider what it means to be a good classmate in this Back-to-School Bus Craftivity Flap Book. It’s also a good souvenir to have. Your children’s parents will thank you!

6. Teacher Q A

You can have a lot of fun with this one in a variety of ways. Place yourself in a circle with your students and allow them to ask you questions such as: What is your favorite food? Color? Animal? Candy? Etc. Alternatively, you could create a quiz and see if they can guess the answers to the following questions. The opportunity to learn more about you, who is a very important person in their lives, is a wonderful opportunity for your students.

7. Don’t forget you!

This one is dedicated to you. If you haven’t already done so, arrive to your classroom long before the start of the school day, tidy your desk, make yourself a cup of coffee, and stash all of the dark chocolate in your desk drawer. This blog article on my favoriteTeacher School Supplieswill provide you with a few more ideas for items to include in your teacher’s station! Stroll through the school to get a sense of the overall atmosphere and meet the folks you will be working with this year, if possible.

8. Make a classroom cheer

Who doesn’t enjoy a good team chant? Gather your pupils around a table and design a snappy classroom chant that you can use throughout the school year. Talk about having a strong sense of camaraderie!

9. Discuss classroom expectations

Is it possible for you to predict what your pupils will expect from the year? Do they, or don’t they? Make a list of their own personal objectives for the school year as a group exercise with your students. This blog article contains several excellent anchor charts that demonstrate how children identify good relationships, their role as students, the role of instructors, and the role of their parents. It’s an excellent beginning point for a conversation about what should be expected in the classroom.

10. Build community

Write out your class’s goal statement or class pledge/promise, and recite it every morning. Making a class mission statement is a good fit with the goal-setting process for students. Student communities can identify themselves as a result of this process and create goals that are consistent with the mission statement.

11. Name labels

Personalize desks, lockers, and cubbies with name cards. Allow kids to write their own names on a piece of paper and then paint the border around it using markers. Then you can laminate it and you’re done! A personal touch may be seen on each desk or cubby. You may also attach the name tags to the kids’ portfolios at the conclusion of the school year.

12. Beach Ball Ice Breaker

Write questions on a beach ball using a permanent marker using a dry erase marker. Take the beach ball and sit in a circle with your students, passing it between them. The student who has caught the ball must answer any of the questions that are displayed before tossing the ball to the next player. This is a wonderful method for students to get to know one another as well as you!

13. Survey Students

Construct a blank bar graph on chart paper, or even better, create a horizontal and vertical bar graph on the same piece of paper. Throughout the day and week, ask kids about their favorite things by using this survey tool. Give each pupil a piece of sticky note paper. Students should be asked to insert their sticky notes in the appropriate columns once they have been given a question. When you use sticky notes on chart paper, your kids will like the participatory nature of the activity. This is truly a shortcut sheet for you to use in order to get to know your kids better, and you can incorporate some math skill training as well!

Don’t forget to ask them some amusing questions as well, in addition to the normal inquiries about their hobbies, siblings, and summer plans. This will help to make the interview even more enjoyable.

14. Encourage your Team

Encourage your teammates! Prepare a tiny present for each and every member of your team (or the whole school staff). Include a letter wishing them a prosperous and happy new year. This Pinterest Board contains several suggestions for teacher gifts.

15. Rules and Procedures

While you’re busy ensuring that your pupils have the best first day ever, don’t forget to review the classroom rules and procedures. Don’t skip over this step. It is critical in ensuring that your school year runs as well as it possibly can. Your kids will benefit much by being aware of the expectations placed on them. We must also admit that this applies to you!

16. Party! Party! Party!

Can you tell me how thrilling the first day of school is? It’s exciting enough to warrant a welcome return celebration! No, I’m serious! What’s the point of waiting till the end of the year? Serve with baked goods, orange or apple juice (or jitter juice! ), and jitter juice. See also 1), as well as bananas and grapes. Include a time for sharing summer memories and dancing away the anxieties.

17. Eat lunch with your students

Consider having lunch with your pupils at least a couple of times a week, if not more frequently. It is critical to demonstrate to your students, especially on the first day, that your class is a “family.”

18. Read aloud – lots!

It’s a good idea to have lunch with your kids at least once or twice a week. It is critical to demonstrate to your children, especially on the first day, that your class is a “family.”

19. Student Gifts

At the conclusion of the day, give each kid a present as a way of thanking them on a successful first day. If your classroom has a theme, you might want to consider giving a gift that is in keeping with the theme!

20. Smile

Last but not least, remember to smile! Maintain an optimistic attitude. Be friendly, make people laugh, and have a good time! Are you seeking for further back-to-school inspiration? Here are some more examples:

  • 9 Ways to Get Your Year Off to a Flying Start
  • The following are five things to remember on the first day of school: Activities on the First Day of School that promote cooperative learning
  • 3 Strategies for Preparing for Back to School
  • Teacher School Supplies You Can’t Do Without
  • Teacher School Supplies You Should Have
  • 80 Sponge Activities: A Teacher’s Guide to Making Every Minute Count
  • A Teacher’s Guide to Making Every Minute Count

There are nine ways to get your year off to a good start The following are five things to remember on the first day of school: 1. The first day of school should include cooperative learning activities. Prepare for the return to school with these three suggestions. Irreplaceable Teacher School Supplies; Irreplaceable Teacher School Supplies A Teacher’s Guide to Making Every Minute Count with 80 Sponge Activities;

See also:  How To Cool Down Your Tent

Week 1 Day 1 – Name Tents with Feedback

Last year, I had the opportunity to teach Advanced Algebra (also known as Alg 2 or Alg/Trig) at a school that was new to me. I was wise in that I went into the year relying on the knowledge of people who had recently taught Adv Alg in the previous year (for me it had been 11 years ago). Every day last year, I collaborated with Morgan to create my Advanced Algebra classes — the same Morgan who was the mastermind of our Backwards Bike, which I previously written about. I’ve had a lot of first days of school in my professional life, but I’m confident that I can learn even more.

  • It was her explanation that she utilizes name tents and that during the first week of school, she writes a brief message for each pupil reacting to whatever they have written within the name tent.
  • We must establish personal connections with pupils.
  • Students improve more as a result of feedback rather than a numerical or letter grade.
  • We must ensure that our classrooms are welcoming environments for all students.
  • Morgan’s objectives for the first week are simple: to establish relationships with her pupils and to foster a sense of community among the entire class.
  • My very first slide of class on the first day of school last year in our High School Math Classrooms was shown here on the screen.
  • I instructed pupils to write their initial name on both sides of the paper.

(Please notice that I have modified it somewhat for this year and have linked it lower down in the post): NameTentFeedback This document is an exact copy of the Word document Morgan sent to me.

Tonya Hodge, one of our school’s AVID leaders, gave this to Morgan as a thank you gift (a ELA teacher).

My request was for them to introduce themselves to the folks with whom they were seated.

This was their first task for the first week of class.

My class consisted of pupils in the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades.

Morgan’s and my objective for the first week was to establish a community of math learners.

On a side note, while creating a sense of community during the first week of school is a very common practice in middle school, it has not been my experience that this practice is as common in high school mathematics classrooms.

We continued with our activities from the previous day.

AA The first day of school was a slog.

An additional portion of my day 1 lecture was posted about HERE the day before.

They did so well.

When we were down to the final five minutes of class, I finally got the students to open their name tents and write me a letter in the yellow highlighted box about anything they wanted to about day one.

That afternoon, I composed a response to each and every kid in my class using a response template.

I enjoy the wide range of answers I receive from my pupils.

By the conclusion of day 4, the following is a picture of the interior of each student’s name tent, along with y remarks about it: As you can see, I did not write a ton to each kid; yet, it was crucial that I wrote something to each of them in some way.

This was critical.

Here are a number of things I discovered after implementing name tents in my high school mathematics classroom during the first week of school.

  1. I have homework tasks that I offer to students during the first week of school that require them to write a great deal more about themselves. This does not take the place of them, but it was an excellent addition. With the extra benefit of being able to provide fast response to pupils
  2. After three days of receiving the prompt “comments,” some students were writing very little or just saying something like “It was OK.” During the last minute of class on day 4, I encouraged students to “Ask me a question” instead of making a remark, and I promised to answer any questions they had regarding the class or about myself personally. This was a huge success. I received a large number of excellent questions. I tried to be as honest as possible in my responses to everyone. As an added bonus, I posted some questions on the board for the whole class to see, allowing everyone to obtain feedback on what their peers were asking of me. I’ve created a new and improved Name Tent for this year’s first week of school (see the bottom of this page for more information), which includes the opportunity for kids to ask me questions. Here are some of the questions that students have posed to me. They’re fantastic. JavaScript is required for this slideshow. Despite reading and replying to kids on a daily basis with what they wrote in their name tents, I was still missing hints that they were sending me. When I went back to the name tents to write this piece, I found some information that my kids had supplied me but that I had overlooked. Consider the following image of the inside of this student’s tent: This was the exterior rear of his tent, and it was very stunning: What I now know about this kid, having missed the first week of class, is that he performed best in math class when we were engaged in more creative activities. This kid completed the least amount of homework and classwork of any student I had this year until about two-thirds of the way through the year, when I completed my Desmos Art Project, and he produced the following in 24 hours: Having reflected on the situation, I wish I had taken notice of his outstanding doodles in week 1 and utilized this as a signal to develop lessons that would engage him sooner. This is something I intend to alter — this year. The name tent this year has been modified to promote sketching instead of replying to me
  3. I understand that many people reading this may say, “Sara, name tents are fantastic, but I just do not have time to put them together.” To give you some hope, I can assure you that the time I invested in them was completely worthwhile. While teaching full-time during the first week of school last year, I would also leave school each day to attend the Minnesota State Fair and work at our Math On-a-Stick exhibit in the evenings, which was a great experience. I had a lot on my plate. I went ahead and did it anyhow, and I’m so pleased I did. In order to hear daily from every student AND for you to give them feedback, I HIGHLY encourage you to consider using these name tents OR doing something else during week 1
  4. I did read my name tents again at the end of September once I got to know my students a little better and I learned a great deal more. This is something I intend to do again this year. If I can figure out a method to do something similar to garner more student comments like this in October or November of this year, I would. For example, every day during week 1 I spent time (5 minutes) making students remember EVERY first name of every kid in the class In fact, I put them to the test on it the next week. Every day, I asked 1-2 groups to step up and introduce themselves to the rest of the class. By day 6, I would estimate that 60 percent of my pupils knew every name, and another 35 percent knew at least 80 percent or more of the names. It fostered a strong sense of camaraderie in the classroom. Later in the first quarter, students expressed their gratitude for the fact that other students recognized their names.

I’d love to know what you do to establish relationships with your math students during the first week of school. What procedures do you use to provide feedback to students? How do you foster a sense of belonging in your classroom? These are some of the most essential objectives I have for the first week of the year. I’m always on the lookout for new inspiration. Wishing you a successful start to the academic year. The NEW and IMPROVED Name Tent for 2016-17:2016 Name Tent for the first week of school

Fun With A Name Tent

Please share your strategies for establishing relationships with your mathematics students during the first week of school. Do you have a system in place for giving feedback to students? What strategies do you use to foster a sense of belonging in your class? In week one, I have a number of essential objectives. Every day, I am on the lookout for new inspiration. Good luck with your school year’s beginning! New and Improved Name Tent for 2016-17:2016 Name Tent for the first week of school.

  • Students are given enough opportunity to construct their greatest thirds. Within their group (of four students), students pick who has the greatest name for their tent. Students cast their votes (as a group) by inspecting the tents and creating a prioritized list
  • Students outline the process through which we choose the best thirds. Students determine what should be measured.

This gallery contains some images of my sloppy writing on a whiteboard as I hastily record what kids say. It’s an intriguing subject. I gave each group a name tent that was competing for the best thirds in the competition. Some organizations took measurements in inches, while others took measurements in centimeters. What unit of measurement they used was irrelevant to me, and I didn’t tell them what to use. I looked about and inquired as to what unit of measurement they were employing, as well as why they had selected that particular unit of measurement.

The majority of pupils were finally persuaded by their friends that centimeters would be more correct in this situation.

It was just fantastic!

As you can see, Leyla was victorious by 0.135 millimeters.

Those are some really nice folds.

It is expected that they would keep a record of their estimates in their compositions books.

Me: No, thank you.

Wow, such a disappointment in class!

Then why are we putting in all of this effort?

I previously stated that I would not disclose my height.

I get my measuring tape out of the drawer!

Me: Brianna: Oh, that’s great!

This was a lot of fun.

Dan provided the inspiration for this phrase.

Given that the majority of students were around 5 feet tall, she advised that we multiply the number of students (20) by 5 feet.

We created a Mansi column in our Google spreadsheet to track our progress.

Before we walked outdoors, I asked the children to line up in a line from what they believed to be the smallest to the tallest.

A lecture on the mean, median, mode, and range might be taught using this well-organized data set.

Dylan’s observation that a student was absent today was another wonderful moment.

Students should be asked to guess the height of the absent child.

What are the chances that the absent child is the same height as the other kids?

My first graders were so kind that they wanted to add my height in the overall height.

Due to the fact that some students were kind enough to avoid planting their feet directly in front of someone else’s head, we walked a little further than 103 feet.

I decided to let it slip because dismissing time was approaching quickly. Reese gets one clap on three for his efforts. She came up with the most accurate measurement of 102 feet. Clap your hands together one, two, and three times. Thirds,1050

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *