What Cfm Fan Do I Need For Grow Tent

How to Calculate Required CFM for a Grow Tent

When it comes to ventilation a grow tent, it’s critical to understand how much air has to be moved in order to offer a suitable amount of fresh air. Due to the fact that it takes up the whole area, you can safely assume that the volume of your grow tent is equal to the amount of air that has to be exchanged. When you are filling the area with accessories, the calculations get a little more complicated. So, using our full-grow tent ventilation instructions, you can learn how to calculate the CFM you require.

The Formula

Determine its cubic foot capacity by multiplying its length by the width and height of the object in question. Convert measurements between different units of measurement as needed. This will equal the volume of your area, and the needed airflow will be equal to this value in cubic feet per minute, or CFM, as shown in the table. The following is an example of the formula: As an example, a 48″x36″x72″ grow tent translated to feet would be a grow tent measuring 4’x3’x6′ in size. When the measurements are added together, the result is 72 ft3 of space.

Grow Tent Accessories

In order to boost your base CFM, you must multiply it by the efficiency percentages of your accessories. In your grow space, adding components such as ducting and carbon filters will reduce fan performance, which will affect how hard your fan must work to achieve the desired results. When it comes to ducting, the quantity and sharpness of its bends play a role in determining the resistance to airflow. As a result, airflow decreases the longer it needs go, making a straighter ducting path more effective.

  • Smoothing out any creases can also help to improve the operation of the fan and the flow of air.
  • These considerations increase your necessary CFM, which necessitates the use of a high-capacity fan in order to move the predicted airflow.
  • Grow light heat multiplied by (base CFM multiplied by component factors) = Required CFM For example, our 4’x3’x6’ grow tent has a baseline CFM of72.
  • Adding a carbon filter (60 percent), ducting (20 percent), and a silencer (20 percent) to our ventilation system increases the airflow rate to 166 cubic feet per minute.
  • Keep in mind that these percentages are not set in stone and may change at any time.

The following is a breakdown of this calculation: Multiplying your base CFM (72) by the percentages of ducting (20 percent), carbon filter (60 percent), silencer (20 percent), and grow light heat (50 percent) of your choosing will provide about the 249 CFM you require.

What CFM Fan Do You Need For a Grow Room or Grow Tent?

The Common Culture inline duct fan is a tough, entry-level fan that is easy to maintain. It is intended to compete against more costly models because to its strong dependability and low noise levels, among other characteristics.

  • Inline duct fans by Common Culture are built to withstand the rigors of everyday use. Due to its great dependability and low noise levels, it is intended to compete against more costly brands on the market.

Vortex Powerfans are an industry standard, and are employed in locations where fan failure is not an option due to the nature of the work. Vortex fans are precision-engineered to deliver optimal performance at the lowest possible cost.

  • 220 CFM having the ability to work with speed controls
  • Heavy gauge steel shell that is impact-resistant and sound-absorbing
  • Hammertone powder coat epoxy finish with a rustproof hammertone finish
  • Warranty of ten years
  • Sizes of recommended grow rooms range from 2′ x 2′ to 4′ x 4′.

Inline grow room fans with a diameter of 6 inches are the best. The Common Culture inline duct fan is a tough, entry-level fan that is easy to maintain. It is intended to compete against more costly models because to its strong dependability and low noise levels, among other characteristics.

  • 400 CFM with the ability to work with speed controls
  • Mounts for the wall and ceiling are supplied. Color of stealth in matte black
  • Warranty of five years
  • Sizes of grow rooms recommended range from 3′ x 3′ to 4′ x 8′.

400 CFM with the ability to work with speed controllers All mounting hardware is provided (wall and ceiling); Stealthy matte black color; Warranty of five years. Growing space dimensions range from three by three feet to four by eight feet.

  • 334 cubic feet per minute and compatible with speed controllers Fans that are 50 percent more efficient than equivalent fans The impeller’s 3D blades have been meticulously engineered to enhance efficiency. Warranty of ten years
  • Sizes of grow rooms recommended range from 3′ x 3′ to 4′ x 8′.

Choosing the Best 8-Inch Inline Grow Room Fans The Common Culture inline duct fan is a tough, entry-level fan that is easy to maintain. It is intended to compete against more costly models because to its strong dependability and low noise levels, among other characteristics.

  • 720 CFM with the ability to work with speed controls
  • Mounts for the wall and ceiling are supplied. Color of stealth in matte black
  • Warranty of five years
  • Sizes of grow rooms recommended range from 5′ x 5′ to 10′ x 10′.

A significant improvement in the durability of the Max-Fan Pro Series housing is due to the use of fiberglass reinforced plastic compounds that fulfill all of the UL and CSA criteria.

  • 863 CFM, with a three-speed controller built in
  • Fans that are 50 percent more efficient than equivalent fans Extremely low wattage to CFM ratio, which saves you money on electricity
  • Warranty of five years
  • Sizes of grow rooms recommended range from 5′ x 5′ to 10′ x 10′.

Is having a duct fan important for grow rooms and grow tents?

Using a confined environment (e.g., a grow room, grow tent, etc.) to grow your plants will guarantee that they produce to their full potential. Proper ventilation will ensure that your plants produce to their full capacity. In a grow room, good ventilation is essential for maintaining humidity and temperature control. This is accomplished by expelling the heated air that is generated by your grow lights and electronic equipment. Cycling out this air also produces comparatively carbon-rich air for your plants to breathe more effectively, allowing them to produce more fruit and vegetables.

What size duct fan and CFM do I need for my grow room?

There are several websites that provide a general rule-of-thumb for CFM calculation that does not take into consideration the differences between each growing environment. We’ll teach you how to calculate CFM by taking several variables of your growing environment into consideration, and then use that information to get the minimum CFM advised for your grow room. Volume of the Growing Environment: Determine the volume of your space by multiplying the length, breadth, and height of its dimensions.

Assuming there are no problems with heat, the growing environment volume in our case is 448 cu./ft., which implies we need to exhaust 448 cu.ft.

As a result, I’ve determined that I require a 224 CFM fan at the very least. Other Variables to Take into Consideration: We haven’t finished yet. Take into consideration the following factors that may force you to have a higher CFM requirement for your grow room:

  1. Lights: For each air-cooled light (600-1000w), double the result of the ‘Volume To CFM’ step by the equivalent of 10% of the result of the previous step. For non-air-cooled lighting, increase the amount by 20% per light. CO2: Increase the percentage by 10% if the room has CO2 enrichment provided by a CO2 burner or generator (which generates heat). Carbon Filters: If you’re using a carbon filter, increase the percentage by 20%. Increase the ambient temperature by 25% if you live in a hot environment (e.g., Southern California, Arizona, etc.). If you live in a humid and hot environment (such as Florida or Georgia), increase the percentage by 40%.

Let’s go over a complete example of computations that takes into consideration each of the four variables mentioned above one by one. Consider the 8′ x 8′ x 7′ grow chamber that was utilized in the previous example as a starting point. The airflow is now at 224 CFM, so that will be our starting point before we begin putting in the extras. For this example, let’s pretend the room includes two non-ventilated 700w LEDs, a CO2 burner, and a carbon filter, and we’re in Southern California. Lights: Increase the airflow by 20% each light multiplied by 224 CFM = 48 CFM.

  • The 96 CFM should be added to your computation of 224 CFM to get a total of 320 CFM.
  • This should be added to your 320 CFM to give you 354 CFM.
  • Adding this to our 354 CFM gives us a total of 402 CFM.
  • 25 percent multiplied by 224 equals 56 CFM.
  • In this particular case, our final computation yields 458 CFM.
  • That being said, we would want to look for a fan with a greater CFM rating than 458 and we can always utilize a fan controller or fan speed controller to reduce the fan speed if necessary.

How long to keep a duct fan turned on in the grow room?

You should only leave your grow room’s duct fan running for as long as it is necessary to maintain the proper temperatures and humidity levels for your plants. As long as the temperature is between 65 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit and the relative humidity ranges between 40 and 60%, your plants should be content in their surroundings.

How do you install a duct fan in a grow room or grow tent?

There are almost as many methods to install a grow room inline fan as there are ways to fry an egg, which is a lot of options. The following are some illustrations of the most typical methods to set up the inline fan + carbon filter for grow rooms:Four Different Ventilation Setups Inside A Grow TentReal-Life Images of Fan + Carbon Filter + Ducting Setup In A Grow TentFour Different Ventilation Setups Inside A Grow Tent

How do you clean to clean grow room exhaust fans?

First and foremost, make certain that your fan is unplugged. Then walk outdoors or put a sheet or newspaper down inside to catch any dirt or debris that has accumulated. Using a moist towel, clean the blades and interior of the exhaust fan to remove any remaining dust and debris.

After that, you’ll want to take a can of compressed air and spray the interior of the fan in those hard-to-reach regions that you weren’t able to reach with a rag earlier in the process. Make certain that the fan has completely dried out before reinstalling it and turning it on again.

Why have oscillating fans in the grow room?

Oscillating fans aid in the delivery of carbon dioxide to your plants, the even distribution of temperature and humidity within the grow environment, the increase in the robustness of the plants’ stalks and branches, and the reduction in the growth of mold and fungi on and around your plants as a result of their use.

What Size Fan Do I Need For My Grow Tent? (With Handy Table For Common Sizes)

First and foremost, the bad news. It’s possible that you’ll have to conduct some math. The good news is that It’s a simple piece of mathematics. And we’ll take you step by step through the process. In addition, we’ll provide you with a useful table that lists the most typical grow tent sizes and configurations. Chances are you will be able to find your information in the table and will not have to perform any calculations.

What Size Fan Do I Need For My Grow Tent?

It is not the size of the fan that is crucial. It refers to the capacity of the fan. First and foremost, you must determine the amount of capacity you require. The capacity, in turn, dictates the size of the fan. For the majority of home gardeners, a 4 or 6 inch fan would suffice. How do we determine the amount of fan capacity you require for your grow tent’s fan? By following the steps in the computation we’ll go through later. Alternatively, you might scroll down to our table and see whether your tent size is listed there as an option.

Calculating Base Fan Requirement For Your Grow Tent

Obtaining the overall volume of your grow tent is the first piece of information you’ll need. To obtain this, simply multiply the width by the length by the height (width times length times height). For the sake of this computation, we are using feet rather than cubic feet per minute since fan capacity are measured in cubic feet per minute in the United States. It makes no difference whether or not you utilize meters in your calculations. Consider the following scenario: you have a 5 by 5 foot grow tent with a height of 78 inches, or 6.5 feet.

  • The total volume is equal to 5 x 6.5 = 162.5 ft3.
  • The capacity of a fan is measured in cubic feet per minute (cfm), which is an abbreviation for cubic feet per minute.
  • For the most part, we recommend that you strive to refill the air in the tent once per minute.
  • Using this formula, divide the entire grow tent volume by two or three to obtain the base fan capacity you want.
  • Not so fast, my friend.
  • If you simply have one fan extracting air and nothing else, the capacity we offer is the minimum amount required.

However, there are likely to be a number of additional components in your arrangement that decrease the fan’s capacity to circulate air. In addition, there are variables that raise the capacity requirements. As a result, we must make certain modifications.

Adjusting For Ducting, Filters, Lights, Etc.

Components such as ducting and filters all contribute to a reduction in the capacity of your fan. You must take this into consideration in your calculations and purchase a fan with greater power to compensate for the drop in airflow. Other components, such as lighting, can enhance your cooling requirements. You’ll need to build in some extra capacity to accommodate them. If your tent is going to be in a hot environment, you should also include some extra capacity. Here are some of the most typical components and considerations to consider, as well as the impact of the additional capacity you’ll wish to add, expressed as a % increase in capacity.

  • Lights: a 10% rise for each additional grow light
  • Filters: a 25% increase for each additional filter
  • Ducting: a 1% increase for each additional foot of ducting
  • Bending of ducting: 30 percent for every 90-degree bend (15 percent for every 45-degree bend)
  • External heat: If your grow tent is located in a warmer area (e.g., the attic or a sunny room) and/or is not adequately insulated from the external environment, the temperature will rise by 10%.
See also:  How To Stake A Tent On A Platform

Add together all of the percentage increases to obtain the overall % increase. Consider the following scenario: we have a single grow lamp, one filter, and 6 feet of ducting with one 90-degree curve. However, the tent is not situated in an exceptionally hot environment. Growth lights add 10% to the total percentage increase, which is 25 percent to the filter and 36 percent to the ducting and bend. The total percentage increase is 71 percent. Then you’ll want to convert this percentage to a decimal and multiply it by one hundred.

  • A 44 percent rise would result in a 1.44 percent gain.
  • As a result, a 125 percent rise would result in a 2.25 percent increase.
  • As a result, 5 percent would be 1.05 percent (and not 1.5, which is a 50 percent increase).
  • In our example, that was 162.5 cubic feet per minute.
  • In our case, the required capacity is 162.5 cfm multiplied by 1.71 to equal 277.875 cfm.
  • However, it is typically a good idea to get a fan that has around 25% greater capacity than you actually require.

Get A Fan With More Capacity Than Required

We strongly advise you to get a fan with a larger capacity than you require. Running fans at full capacity puts greater strain on them, which means they will not last as long as they should. It also causes them to become louder. When you run a fan at a lower speed than its maximum speed, it will last longer and operate more silently. It also provides the ability to expand capacity in the event that your cooling requirements develop in the future. Nothing can be predicted; a heat wave, for instance, may occur.

Adding 25 percent to our previous example works in the same way as before: increase the capacity by 1.25 times the percentage.

Make a rounding error and purchase the next largest capacity fan of the type you desire. In this scenario, the 6 inch version of the fan we offer in the next section would most likely be the best option. It has a capacity of 402 cubic feet per minute.

What Is A Good Fan To Get?

There are many various types of fans available on the market, and the most of them will perform admirably. In general, the more money you spend, the higher the quality of the product or service you receive. This typically indicates that the fan operates at a lower noise level, is more efficient (has a larger capacity per watts consumed), and has a longer lifespan. Our favorite fans are the AC Infinity Cloudline fans. They are neither the most affordable nor the greatest quality. However, they are the most cost-effective option.

The 4 inch fan has a capacity of 205 cfm, the 6 inch has a capacity of 402 cfm, and the 8 inch has a capacity of 807 cfm.

This would necessitate the purchase of a number of fans.

Table Of Fan Requirements For Common Grow Tent Sizes

The fan power (in cubic feet per minute) required for various grow tent sizes is shown in the following table. It is not an issue if the height of your tent is somewhat different from the standard height. The capacity that has been provided will still be adequate for your needs. In the same way, if you have a few additional feet of ducting (or a few extra feet less), you may still utilize the closest circumstance in the table to get the job done. Because you should be purchasing a fan that can handle around 25% more airflow than your requirements, you should have some wiggle space if you find yourself in need of a little extra power later on.

  1. That implies one light for everything up to and including the 55, two lights for the 48 and 510, and four lights for the two biggest sizes, respectively.
  2. That means the cfm value you are given is your final number, and it is this number that you should search for in a fan while shopping.
  3. We suggest their 6 inch fan for anything that requires less than 402 cfm.
  4. If your tent’s airflow requirements exceed 807 cfm, you’ll need to install many fans in it.

Do I Need An Intake Fan?

The fan power (in cubic feet per minute) required for various grow tent sizes is shown in the table below. A little difference in the height of your tent will not cause any issues. You will be able to use the capacity that has been provided. As an example, if you have a few additional feet of ducting (or a few fewer), you may still utilize the circumstance that is the closest to you in the table. Because you should be purchasing a fan that can handle around 25% more airflow than your requirements, you should have some wiggle space if you find yourself in need of a little extra power further down the road.

That implies one light for everything up to and including the 55, two lights for the 48 and 510, and four lights for the two biggest models.

Consequently, you should seek for a fan with a cfm value equal to or higher than the one you were provided.

They have a 6 inch fan that is good for anything under 402 cfm. We recommend their 8-inch fan for anything with a flow rate less than 807 cfm. A number of fans will be required in your tent if your airflow needs exceed 807 cfm.

What Size Carbon Filter Do I Need?

When purchasing a carbon filter, there are basically just two considerations to keep in mind. The first is that the flange size must correspond to the fan size. If you purchase a 4 inch fan, be certain that you also get a 4 inch filter. Second, ensure that the filter’s capacity (also measured in cubic feet per minute) is equal to or greater than the fan’s capacity. It is recommended that you get filters from the same manufacturer as your fans. For example, if you choose the AC Infinity fans that we propose, they will come with matching filters as well.

Where To Place Fans And Filters

You have a great deal of latitude in this situation. The first option you must make is whether to place both the fan and the filter inside or outside of the tent, depending on your preference. It is also possible to have one inside and one outdoors. Inside is normally less difficult, but it may not be a choice if you do not have the necessary room. If you’re thinking about placing your grow tent outside, check out ” Carbon Filter Outside Grow Tent “. The fan and filter should be placed at the very top of the tent if they are being used within the enclosure.

In order to pull in colder air, the intake vents (or fans, if you want to use them) should be situated toward the bottom of the enclosure.

Fan Size For Grow Tent: Final Thoughts

Calculating the proper fan size for your grow tent may appear to be a difficult task, but it does not have to be. In following the guidelines we provided above, you will end up with a fan that is capable of successfully removing any surplus heat from your tent, regardless of whether you have a large grow tent or a little grow tent setup. Most likely, the size of your tent was already included in our table, and you were able to avoid having to perform the calculation. It wasn’t that tough, even if you had to perform the arithmetic (or even if you simply ran through it in your head), since it wasn’t that complicated.

Grow Room Fan Size Calculator with Size-wise CFM

Grow Room Fan Size Calculator with Size-Wise Results»Home»Environment»Grow Room Fan Size Calculator with Size-Wise Results CFM31702Views0 If the ventilation is too low or too high, it is the same as having dead(almost) grow plants. And the overall ventilation of your grow system is mostly determined by the size of the intake and exhaust fans that you use. So, how do you determine the appropriate fan size for a grow room? To calculate the size of your grow room or tent’s extractor fan, multiply the volume of your grow room (in cubic feet), the carbon filter factor (+25 percent), the insulation factor (20 percent), the length of ducting (plus 10 percent for every 10 feet), and the light factor (plus 10 percent for every 1000W).

If you want to figure out what size intake fan for grow room to utilize, simply subtract 15-20 percent from the size of the extractor fan.

Some of you may eventually raise an eyebrow and wonder, “What on earth do these ‘factors’ mean?”.

Take it easy for a while, dear grower.

We’ve spent the better part of three thousand and one words writing this entire post to answer these apparent queries of yours. Please allow yourself a few minutes to go through the full text if you are truly interested in learning how the math behind this method works.

Factors to Consider in Calculating Grow Room Fan Size

Home»Environment»Grow Room Fan Size Calculator with Size-Wise Selection»Grow Room Fan Size Calculator with Size-Wise Selection» CFM31702Views0 The same amount of dead(almost) grow plants may be found in either low or high ventilation. In addition, the overall ventilation of your grow system is mostly determined by the size of the intake and exhaust fans you choose. So, how do you figure out what size fan to use in your grow space? To calculate the size of your grow room or tent’s extractor fan, multiply the capacity of your grow room (in cubic feet), the carbon filter factor (+25 percent), the insulation factor (20 percent), the length of ducting (plus 10% for every 10 feet), and the light factor (plus 10% for every 1000W).

Simply subtract 15-20 percent from the extracted air volume to determine the size of the intake fan for a grow room to employ.

Dear Grower: Take it easy for a while.

Please allow yourself a few minutes to read through the full text if you truly want to understand how the math behind this method works.

Factor 1: The Volume of The Room/Tent

To begin, determine how much room your fans will have to contend with, also known as the active grow space. Or to put it another way, that is the area illuminated by your grow lights. And, in order to keep things simple, let’s suppose that your fans will be able to completely replenish the air in the room in one minute (explained in the next section). a general rule of thumb Simply take the measurements of your tent (length, breadth, and height) and multiply them together to obtain the total volume.

Without taking into consideration any other considerations, this figure represents the fan CFM that you require.

For example: Fan Size= (10 feet by 10 feet by 7 feet)/1 Minute = 700 CFM; Fan Size = (10 feet by 10 feet by 7 feet)/1 Minute = 700 CFM;

Factor 2: Time of Complete Air Replacement

When determining the fan size required for your grow room or tent, you must first determine the volume of air that needs to be ventilated each minute of the day. Because, as you may be aware, the size unit (CFM) indicates the amount of air that the fan can move in a minute. a general rule of thumb Calculate the volume of your grow area (length x breadth x height) and divide it by the number of minutes it takes to completely exhaust all of the air in your grow space.

According to this example, if the room’s dimensions are 10 feet(L) x 10 feet(W) x 7 feet(H), the total volume will be 700 cubic feet in total. And if it takes around 2 minutes to exhaust the whole volume of air, the calculation would be Fan Size= 700 cubic feet/ 2= 350 cubic feet per minute.

Factor 3: Presence of Carbon Filter

A carbon filter inline in the ventilation system reduces the effectiveness of an extractor fan. After passing through a layer of activated carbon, the speed of the air is reduced to a certain level. Additionally, the age, size, and thickness of the activated CO2 layer of the filter, among other factors, must be kept to a minimum. However, for the time being, we will not be including them. a general rule of thumb Extraction fan efficiency is reduced by 25 percent when carbon filters are used. So if you have one in-line carbon filter in your system and your fan has a general capacity of 200 CFM, the actual fan size required is: Fan Size= (200 CFM + (20 percent)) = 250 CFM.

Factor 4: Insulation of the Room

If you are growing in a well-insulated area that does not experience a great deal of heat exchange with the surrounding environment, you do not need to take this element into consideration. Theattic, basement, upstairs, south-facing bedroom, and other such spaces with less insulation and more exposure to the sun are examples of such regions that need to be taken into mind. In any of these scenarios, the temperature will be either higher or lower than the temperature that you are required to maintain in your grow room.

If the unit is located in a chilly environment, such as a basement, the needed CFM should be reduced by 15%.

Factor 5: The Ductwork Curves and Length

It should go without saying that ducting bends and length will reduce the air extraction capability of the fans in the system. Depending on the size of your grow room and the quantity of plants in it, there are three possible ducting configurations:

  1. Ducting that is as short as possible or without bends
  2. The following types of ductingruns are available: medium ductingruns (5-10 feet) with 2-3 bends
  3. Long ductingruns (10-20 feet) with 3-6 bends
See also:  What Size Tent For 8 Plants

As a general rule of thumb The fan CFM will increase by 5 percent for every 5 feet of ducting that is installed. The CFM will increase by 20% for every 90-degree angle in the ducting. If you have a 200CFM starting fan size, you need do the following: Consider the following: fan size considering ducting(15′)=(200 CFM + (20015 percent))= 230 CFMF Consider the following: 320 CFM (assuming bends (3) = 200 CFM plus (200-60 percent)) = 200 CFM

Factor 6: Lights and Other Heat Sources

As you are aware, the two most evident heat sources in a lamp are the lights and the pumps. If you utilize air-cooled lights in your grow room, though, things are a little different. However, if they are not air-cooled, you must account for each of them when estimating the size of your expected fan. The same is true for other heat-generating equipment such as motors and other such devices. As a general rule of thumb For every 1000W of bulb power, increase the fan cfm need by approximately 10%.

If you have four fans each rated at 1000W and each with a capacity of 200CFM, the total will be as follows: Fan Size= (200 CFM + (200 40%))= 280 CFM If you have four fans each rated at 1000W and each with a capacity of 200CFM, the total will be as follows:

Grow Room Fan Size Calculator(ExtractorIntake Fan)

To complete this section of thegrow room fan size guide, we’ll use a test case of a grow space, imply some generic conditions, and figure out the final size of bothgrow room ventilationfans of both extract and intake. Consider the following scenario: we have an 8x8x7 grow tent in your basement, along with an inline carbon filter that is connected to a 4′′ duct system. There are 15 plants to grow in the room because it is large enough for ScrOG style training (according to our size guide). At a certain stage of growth, there are four 600W HID lamps that are air-cooled to provide light.

Extractor Fan

Let’s start with the formula for the grow room extractor and intake fan calculator:-

Step 1: Calculate the Space Volume

The first step is rather straightforward. All that is left to determine is which unit to use. These standards are divided into two categories, one being the European Standard and the other being the North American Standard. The first type of standard measures the distance in meters (m), whereas the second type measures the distance in feet (ft) (f). For example, let us use the American Standard of measuring as an example. As a result, the tent’s volume will be as follows: Volume= 8 feet x 8 feet x 7 feet = 448 cubic feet

Step 2: Calculate The Air Replacement Time

For the sake of argument, let us suppose that whichever fan we end up with will be able to replenish the whole volume of air in the tent/room in less than one minute. The computation becomes less complicated as a result of this. Fan Size = Volume x Number of Minutes to Empty 448 cubic feet per minute = 448 cubic feet per minute of air (Cubic Feet Per Minute)

Step 3: Calculate Carbon Filter Allowance

As previously stated, we have a 4″ carbon filter installed in our setup, which is connected to the ducting system. Furthermore, the precise pace at which it will impair fan efficiency is 25 percent. As a result, the fan size is 448 CFM plus (448 25 percent) = 560 CFM.

Step 4: Calculate the Insulation

The amount of insulation in the grow room/tent has a significant impact on the environment in which the plants develop. Consider the fact that we have a grow setup in the basement, which is significantly colder than the other room where it was originally planned to be. As a result, we’ll take a 15% reduction in the needed fan size for the space into consideration. Fan Size= 560 CFM – (560 15%)= 476 CFM Fan Size= 560 CFM – (560 15%)= 476 CFM

Step 5: Calculate the Ductwork

When we have an 88 grow tent setup with a grow room ducting fan, we are advised to maintain the ducting to a maximum of 10 feet in length (including the bends). That is not a rule or anything like that, but let us stay with it for the purpose of calculation. There are approximately 2 bends in the ducting as a result of multiple turnings and modifications. As a result, fan size = 560 CFM + (560 10%) + (560 40%) = 840 CFM. Fan size = 560 CFM + (560 10%) + (560 40%) = 840 CFM.

Step 6: Calculate the Lights

In our 88 grow tent arrangement with a grow room ducting fan, we’re expected to maintain the ducting within 10 feet of the grow tent walls at all times (including the bends). There are no rules or anything like that, but let’s keep with it for the purpose of calculations.

There are approximately 2 bends in the ducting as a result of multiple turns and modifications. As a result, fan size equals 560 CFM plus (560 10%) plus (560 40%) equals 840 CFM (fan size multiplied by 560 10%).

Intake Fan

Are you finished with the calculation of the grow room exhaust fan size? Now is a good time to introduce some fresh air into the grow chamber through the air intake fan. Once you’ve determined the size of your exhaust fan, determining the size of your grow room intake fan is rather straightforward. In the grow chamber, there should be a tiny negative pressure in the air. That implies you have to take in slightly less air than you exhale in order to maintain the same pressure. It follows that the CFM of the intake fan cannot be as high as the CFM of the exhaust fan, for obvious reasons.

So, based on our prior data, the final intake fan size is 714 CFM (840 CFM – 15%) = 714 CFMSo, the final intake fan size is 714 CFM (840 CFM – 15%).

Quick Recommendations(for Grow Tent)

There are a limited number of grow tent sizes available, and determining the appropriate grow fan size can be a time-consuming procedure. For normal grow tent sizes, we’ll supply you with a fan size that has been calculated in this section of the grow room fan size calculator guide:

What Size Fan for 2×2 Grow Tent?

In a 2x2x6 tent, there is typically one carbon filter, four 400-watt non-air-cooled lights, no ducting inside, and a passive air intake system for bringing in fresh air. The fan size for a 2x2x6 grow tent is (24 cubic feet per minute) x 1.25 x (1.2) = 36CFM if you maintain it well-insulated from the environment.

What Size Fan for 2×4 Grow Tent?

It is common for a 2x4x6 tent to have one carbon filter, four 600W non-air-cooled lights, 3-6 feet of ducting inside, and an air intake system that is passive in nature. If you maintain it well-insulated from the surrounding environment, then-Fan size for 2x4x6 grow tent= (48 cubic feet per minute) x 1.25 x 1.05 x 1.25= 78 CFM if you keep it well-insulated from the surrounding environment

What Size Fan for 3×3 Grow Tent?

One carbon filter, four 600-watt non-air-cooled lights, 3-6 feet of ducting, and a passive air intake system are all standard features of a two-by-four-by-six tent. The fan size for a 2x4x6 grow tent is (48 cubic feet per minute) x 1.25 x 1.05 x 1.25 = 78 CFM if you maintain it well-insulated from the surrounding environment; otherwise, the fan size is

What Size Fan for 4×4 Grow Tent?

When it comes to a 4x4x6 tent, you receive one carbon filter, four 600W (non-air cooled) lights, eight to ten feet of ducting inside, and a passive ventilation system. If you maintain it well-insulated from the surrounding environment, then-Fan size for 4x4x6 grow tent= (96 cubic feet per minute) x 1.25 x 1.08 x 1.25 = 130 CFM if you keep it well-insulated

What Size Fan for 4×8 Grow Tent?

When it comes to a 4x8x6 tent, you receive one carbon filter, four 600W (non-air cooled) lights, ten to fourteen feet of ducting inside, and an active air intake system.

If you maintain it well-insulated from the rest of the environment, then- 192 cubic feet per minute multiplied by 1.25 × 1.12 x 1.25 = 336 cubic feet per minute (exhaust fan size for 4x8x6 grow tent). The size of the intake fan for a 4x8x6 grow tent is 285 CFM.

What Size Fan for 5×10 Grow Tent?

One carbon filter, four 800W lights (non-air cooled), 15-18 feet of ducting on the interior, and an active air intake system are all included in a tent measuring 5x10x8. If you maintain it well-insulated from the rest of the environment, then- For a 5x10x8 grow tent, the extract fan size is (400 cubic feet per minute) x 1.32 x 1.16 x 1.25 = 765 cubic feet per minute. The size of the intake fan for a 5x10x8 grow tent is 650 CFM.

What Size Fan for 8x8x8 Grow Tent?

When it comes to an 8x8x8 tent, you receive one carbon filter, four 1000W (non-air cooled) lights, 18-20 feet of ducting inside, and an active air intake system, to name a few amenities. If you maintain it well-insulated from the rest of the environment, then- The extract fan size for an 8x8x8 grow tent is equal to (512 cubic feet per minute) x 1.4 x 1.19 x 1.25 = 1066 cubic feet per minute. The size of the intake fan for an 8x8x8 grow tent is 906 CFM.

What Size Fan for 10×10 Grow Tent?

One carbon filter, six 800-1000W (non-air cooled) lights, 20-22 feet of ducting inside, and an active air intake system are included in a tent of approximately 10x10x8 feet. If you maintain it well-insulated from the rest of the environment, then- 10x10x8 grow tent extract fan size = (800 cubic feet per minute) x 1.54 x 1.22 x 1.00 = 1878 cubic feet (CF). The size of the intake fan for a 10x10x8 grow tent is 1600 CFM.

Boost Grow Room/Tent Fan Life By Doing These

You should be aware of how critical it is to have a fan in a grow room. Being a little more cautious about a few things might help to extend the life of these gadgets. Let’s have a look at how-

Don’t Mismatch Your Ducting and Fan Diameters

Already, ducting is a significant factor in lowering the fan efficiency. The situation becomes much more dire if your fan and ducting have adiameter mismatches, as described above. As an illustration, a combination of a 6′′ fan and 4′′ ducting will result in airflow being slowed. Summary: Make an exact fit between the fan diameter and the ducting diameter when designing your system.

Induce Active Air Intake Instead of Passive

If you’re dealing with a medium-sized grow room or tent, a few air intake holes will not be adequate to draw in enough fresh air to keep things running well. In order to keep up with the wind pressure and air supply in grow spaces that are higher than 8’8″ or so, active air intake fans for grow rooms should be used. Also, find out how to set up an exhaust fan in a grow room to ensure optimum efficacy and efficiency.

Use A Centrifugal Fan

Growing in tiny tents or rooms with squirrel type grow fans is an excellent option. Centrifugal fans, on the other hand, are more appropriate for bigger spaces with higher extraction power requirements. The calculations for the grow room fan calculator in this post were all created in this manner, in fact, throughout the whole text. Centrifugal fans are those that are used in conjunction with an air conditioning panel, ducting, and a carbon filter to circulate air. It will filter the air in your home, chill the grow lights, and ventilate the garden air as well as provide other benefits.

Control Your Fan Speed

You must provide varied levels of air ventilation for your plants depending on their development stage and the season. If we take the vegetative stage as an example, it should be higher than it should be during the seedling period.

And a fan speed controller can help you do this. Using timers, some of their more complex models allow for this CFM fluctuation to be pre-programmed in advance. In addition, make certain that the fans have a suitable on-off cycle.

Protect from Bugs

The inlet/outlet fan is normally situated close to the ground surface of the machine. Because the air near the ground has a lower temperature than the air above it. However, this increases the likelihood of bugs, dust, and airborne diseases entering the building. Maintain the protection of your grow room fan arrangement by installing a bug mesh into the inlet fans to eliminate this hazard. It will also help to lessen the amount of noise generated by the grow room exhaust fan. You have, on the other hand, recommended that you use the quietest grow room exhaust fan available.

When Exactly You Care About Fan Size?

We know that you, as a dedicated grower, already have an idea of what you want to do next. But let us consider the significance of accurate grow room fan cfm calculation for the time being –

Growing Plants Demands More Airflow

In the early stages of a plant’s growth, the leaves are less in size than they eventually become. As a result, the amount of CO2 that they absorb from the surrounding air is not that significant. A good wind around the leaves may be able to provide them with the necessary carbon dioxide supply. However, as they mature, their leaves increase larger, necessitating the production of CO2. Photographic activities like as photosynthesis and transpiration are carried out more often. CO2 (for photosynthesis) and oxygen (for transpiration) are becoming more scarce as the climate warms.

In order to do this, more powerful and consistent extractor fans will be required, but the passive and active air intake systems will remain operational.

See also:  Mr Buddy Heater In Tent When It'S 38 Outside

To Evacuate Excess Heat

A grow system’s primary heat sources include lamps, lights, and pumps, which are all widespread in the industry. They become the primary source of heat and temperature in a closed-off grow room environment. Unless you provide adequate ventilation, they will soon elevate the temperature to 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more. When the temperature rises to this level, plants begin to develop more slowly and are more susceptible to heat stress. Even in the worst-case situation, they may succumb to their injuries.

In addition, the humidity in the grow chamber will rise as a result.

Final Words

Phew! It had been a long road from the beginning to this point in the post, and I was exhausted. But, by the conclusion of this article, we hope you’ve learnt what to look for and how to calculate fan size for a grow room or any sealed grow environment. Please share your thoughts if you require a customized solution to this issue in your comments. We’ll get back to you as soon as we can with an appropriate response. Best of luck with your growth! I’m Saleh, and I’m a blogger that enjoys doing home improvement projects on the side.

Whatforme.com is my tiny corner of the internet where I can communicate what I’ve learnt first-hand, particularly in the field of home repair. The most recent posts by smsaleh (see all)

Grow Room Fan Size Calculator with Size-wise CFM

Because I am an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make eligible purchases. You will not be charged any additional fees! Different sized grow tents will necessitate the use of different sized fans. But that’s not all there is to it. The CFM of your grow tent should be calculated with several other important elements in mind, as follows: Here in this post, we’ll walk you through a straightforward technique for determining the size of your fan under any and all circumstances. Is it time to get started?

Factor to Consider When Calculating Grow Room Fan Size

In order to get the calculation right for you, you must take into account a number of important elements that will influence the demand for tent ventilation. You must consider all of the elements that influence the amount of airflow required in your grow tent. Understand that for every grow area, you will want a fan with a CFM that is capable of accommodating and maintaining the conditions in your tent. a. As a result, it is essential to evaluate all of the factors that will help your plants develop in the greatest possible environment.

  • I.
  • It refers to the overall amount of area and volume that your fan must contend with.
  • When purchasing a fan, be sure that it has the capacity to replenish all of the air in the grow room.
  • And, perhaps most crucially, your fan will be in charge of ensuring that air is circulated evenly throughout your grow space.
  • Its CFM should not be set too low, as this will prevent it from properly circulating and supplying air to the whole grow chamber.
  • The effects on your plants are likely to be bad in this situation.
  • To calculate the overall volume of the tent, multiply the height, breadth, and length of the tent together.

It is important to note that most fans are measured in Cubic Feet Per Minute (CFPM) (CFM).

Example: Peter discovered that the height of his Grow area was 5 feet, the width was 5 feet, and the height was 7 feet after measuring it.

Listed below are the results of the calculations for the total volume of his fan CFM.

However, that should not be the only thing to take into account in the decision.

II.

The amount of air that may move through ductwork at any one moment is determined by the design of the ductwork.

As a result, it is important to take them into consideration while selecting a fan.

ducting with long runs: These have a length of between 10 and 20 feet and a number of bends ranging from three to six.

Design with a minimum of frills: Because they do not have ducting, there are no bends above them.

Ductwork is used to calculate the CFM.

When you think about curves, you take the angle into consideration.

In example, if you have a tent with ductworks that are 5 feet in length and contain 90-degree bends, you will need to add a total of 25% more CFM to your fan.

With three 90-degree ducting beds and a total length of 15 feet, it is a versatile piece of equipment.

Because of the ducting, total CFM = (200 CFM + (200 15%) + (200 x 60 percent) = 350 CFM.

A total of 60 percent comes from the three curves, with each curve contributing 20 percent to the total CFM.

If you are unsure of the CFM required for your tent volume, you may use the method we explained above to figure out how much you will need.

Before you choose a certain CFM, you must first determine the volume of air that will be necessary to be supplied to your grow area on a minute-to-minute basis.

It would simply be a matter of determining how many minutes you would like to spend replacing the whole air in your Grow tent with fresh air.

As an illustration: Peter had computed his entire volume and had come up with a figure of 175 CFM.

5 minutes are allotted.

1 Minute is allotted.

Use the same calculation to determine the CFM you will require for your fan based on the volume of your tent and divide the result by the number of minutes you desire to completely replace the air in your grow tent to arrive at your final result.

Growing rooms located above, in the basement, attic, or in rooms facing south are examples of this.

Rooms that do not suffer a great deal of heat exchange from their surroundings are suitable for this purpose.

Calculating CFM Based on the Insulation of the Room If the temperature in your grow room is higher than necessary, consider purchasing a fan with 20 percent more CFM.

Example: If your CFM is 200, then for warm rooms, the formula is: (200 + (200% of 200%)) = 240 CFM.

When calculating CFM for different volumes, the same formula should be used.

V.

When air is passed through a carbon filter, the speed of the air is reduced to a certain extent.

Read this post on Carbon filters for a Grow Tent to discover more about what a carbon filter is and why you should use one.

The use of a carbon filter can lower the amount of air extraction from your grow tent by up to 25%.

As an illustration: Duke has a grow size volume of 400 cubic feet per minute.

As a result, total CFM = (400 CFM plus (400 x 25 percent))total CFM = 500 CFM. VI. Thermal Heat SourcesThe use of electrical equipment in your grow tent may be a significant source of surplus heat in your grow tent environment. Some of these appliances are as follows:

Alternatively, if you do not have coolers in your grow tent, you will need to take into consideration the heat generated in your grow tent by these equipment. When using your Grow tent, you must make an educated guess as to the amount of heat you are feeling. When it comes to heat output, lights are the most significant contributor. The most effective approach to cope with it is to install lighting systems that have the appropriate wattage for your Grow tent environment. Read our post on how to calculate the wattage required for your grow tent to discover how to calculate the wattage required for your grow tent.

It is advised that you add 10 percent of CFM for every heat source in your grow tent to ensure proper ventilation.

If you have 1000W lights that are not cool and you have a 200 CFM grow space, you should compute as follows.

Also, keep in mind that you must multiply the percentage by the number of lights in your home.

Procedure for Calculating Total CFM for Your Grow Tent

Different factors that you should take into consideration when determining the CFM for your Grow tent have previously been mentioned. It is critical that you include the CFM of every component that has an impact on the performance of your Grow tent. Don’t include all of the variables. Only provide the information that is relevant in your situation. When calculating the overall CFM for your Grow tent, it is not necessary to include the CFM of a Carbon Air Filter if you do not have any air filters in your Grow room.

  • Fan for Extraction These are the fans that are in charge of expelling air from the grow tent.
  • Step 1: Determine the size of the grow room.
  • Dimensions: Width x Length x Height In this instance, the Volume will be as follows: 8 feet by 8 feet by 7 feet is 448 cubic feet in volume.
  • Step 2: Divide the volume by the time it takes to replace the air.
  • If you want to evacuate all of the air from your tent in less than a minute, the following method will work well for you.
  • 448 CFM is the total (Cubic Feet per Minute) Step 3: Specify the need for a carbon filter.
  • In order to get the highest possible operating rate, you must increase the total CFM of your tent by 25%.

When there is an excessive amount of heat, increase the fan’s CFM by 20 percent.

Therefore; A cooler room’s fan size is 560 cubic feet per minute multiplied by 15 to get 476 cubic feet per minute.

We shall begin with the volume of a cooler room in order to avoid any misunderstanding.

Every foot adds one percent to the volume, while the bends add twenty percent to the total cubic feet per minute (CFM).

Step 6: Identify the heat source Every 1000 watts is meant to result in a ten percent increase in loudness.

However, if you do not have any cooled lights, increase the CFM by 10%.

The formula for calculating the size of an intake fan is shown below. The intake fan should be 15 percent less powerful than the extraction fan, according to the manufacturer. For example, to get the fan size, subtract 15 percent from the overall volume of your Grow Fan.

Best Fans For Your Grow Tents

At the end of the day, the most important thing is the fan you purchase. You may have calculated all of the sizes correctly, but if you choose a fan that does not provide the greatest performance, your calculations will be rendered ineffective. This is why it is critical that when you have determined the size of your fan, you consider purchasing a higher-quality model. Following extensive study, we have discovered the following: Grow tent fans that will put on a spectacular show for your benefit.

Cloudline S6 from AC Infinity (Our Top Pick) The fan is the ideal size for a medium-sized grow tent.

The Most Important Characteristics

  • Ideal for a medium-sized room in terms of strength
  • Extremely peaceful
  • For more efficient power use, use the variable setting.

The fan may be purchased at Amazon. Click here to find out the most recent pricing and to purchase it right now. TJERNLUND M-67 Inline Duct Booster Fan is a fan that is installed in the ductwork. The fan produces 460 cubic feet per minute of electricity. This means that it can be used for a long period of time without deteriorating in performance. The Most Important Characteristics

  • Made from durable and high-quality materials
  • The blade design is efficient, allowing it to handle a large volume of air
  • Fan that is extremely silent

The fan may be purchased at Amazon. Click here to get the most recent pricing and to purchase it from Amazon. Vortex 347 CFM S Line S-600 Fan, 6″ Vortex 347 CFM S Line S-600 Fan, 6″ You will be able to grow anything you choose in your tent or indoors with this tool. The Most Important Characteristics

  • The fan may be purchased on Amazon.com. To find out the most recent pricing and to purchase it from Amazon, please visit the link provided above. 347 cubic feet per minute (CFM) S Line S-600 fan 6″ Vortex 347 cubic feet per minute (CFM) S Line S-600 fan You will be able to grow anything you like in your tent or indoors with this tool. Highlights of the Book

The fan may be purchased at Amazon. To find out the most recent pricing and to purchase the fan from Amazon, visit this page. The Hurricane Inline Fan has a tiny footprint, making it an excellent alternative for those with limited growing space. The Most Important Characteristics

  • Construction that is long-lasting
  • A fan that is very quiet
  • And ease of installation.

The fan may be purchased at Amazon. Click here to get the most recent pricing and to purchase it from Amazon right away. Terrabloom 10″ Inline Duct Fan with Remote Control It has a high airflow rate of up to 1065 cubic feet per minute. While doing so, it is also very cost-effective. The Most Important Characteristics

  • Runs at peak performance for a longer amount of time
  • Ultra-quiet ceiling fan
  • CFM coverage that is both strong and efficient in terms of energy usage

The fan is now available for purchase on the market. Click here to find out the most recent price and to purchase the fan right now.

Parting Shot

That is all there is to it. There’s nothing complex here. Using this straightforward approach, you can now determine the appropriate size for your fan. Above all, we recommend that you purchase one of the fans that we have mentioned in this post. For you to spend a significant amount of time determining the size of your fan just to purchase a fan that cannot provide you with superior performance would be a waste of time.

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