What Woman Put A Tent Peg In

Jael – Wikipedia

Jael or Yael
Jacopo Amigoni,Jael and Sisera, 1739
Nationality Kenite
Spouse(s) Heber the Kenite

It was JaelorYael (Hebrew: Yl) who saved Israel from the troops of KingJabinofCanaan in the Book of Judges of the Hebrew Bible. She was the heroine in the story. After Barak failed to act at the urging of the prophetessDeborah, God transferred Sisera’s authority to Yael, who murdered him by putting a tent peg through his skull after he entered her tent beside the huge tree in Zaanannim nearKedesh, where she was staying.

Name

Hebrewya’elmeans mountain goat, and it is an agile, sure-footed mountain goat that is endemic to that region. Translation: “He will climb or go up.” According to the most recent statistics, Yael is one of the most popular female first names in contemporaryIsrael.

Family

James Tissot’s painting Jael depicts Sisera lying dead in front of Barak (1896–1902). Heber the Kenite’s wife, Jael, has frequently been assumed to be Heber the Kenite. Although the Hebrew word translated in this way might possibly indicate “a woman from the Kenite sect,” the meaning of the phrase is unclear. TheKeniteswere a nomadic tribe that lived in close proximity to the Israelites at the time of Moses’ death. Many occurrences of intermarried couples are documented throughout the Bible; the father-in-law ofMoseswas probably a Kenite, however it is not certain if this was Jethro.

Heber the Kenite

As recorded in the Book of Judges in the Bible, Heber the Kenite ( ) was descended from Reuel the Midianite, Moses’ father-in-law and a descendant of Heber the Midianite ( ). He and his wife Jael had distanced themselves from the otherKenites and had erected their tent in the plain of Zaanaim, which lies nearKedeshin the tribal region ofNaphtali and was far away from the otherKenites. Hula Valley (formerly known as Zaanaim) in northern Israel, during the period of the Israelite judges, was home to Heber, who lived approximately during the 12th century BC.

Jael in the Book of Judges

As recorded in the Book of Judges in the Bible, Heber the Kenite( ) was descended from Reuel the Midianite, Moses’ father-in-law and a descendant of Heber the Midianite ( ). To avoid being attacked by the otherKenites, Joseph and his wife Jael had distanced themselves and set up camp in the plain of Zaanaim, which lies nearKedeshin the tribal realm of Naphtali. Hula Valley (formerly known as Zaanaim) in northern Israel, during the period of the Israelite judges, was home to Heber, who lived probably in the 12th century BC.

Artistic depictions of Jael

Images of Jael found in medieval manuscripts, most of which were illuminated, presented her as both a protector of Israel and a prefiguration of the Virgin Mary. A number of works, like the Stavelot Bible, the Speculus Darmstadt, and others, illustrate this point effectively. When she is not portrayed in the process of killing Sisera, she is seen carrying her hammer and, on occasion, the spike, which makes her simple to recognize. The theme is one of the most frequently depicted in Renaissance works as part of the Power of Womentopos, with other biblical women who have prevailed over males, such as Judith or Delilah.

Jael was featured in sets of the feminine Nine Worthies, such as the prints by Hans Burgkmair, which was a favorable development.

Throughout the Baroque period, Jael was shown as a sexual figure in art.

Gregorio Lazzarinian and Artemisia Gentileschi’s paintings of Jael in the act of murdering her adversary are two instances of lovely Jael in action. Jael is portrayed by Henri Andréani in the silent film Jael and Sisera (1911), which was directed by Andréani.

In popular culture

The artist Bartolomeo Veneto painted a portrait of a Venetian Jewish lady with the qualities of Jael around approximately 1500.

  • The novel The Last Chronicle of Barsetcontains a sub-plot in which the painter Conway Dalrymple portrays the heiress Clara Van Siever as Jael driving a “nail” through the head of Sisera
  • P.G. Wodehouse mentions Jael in several of his stories
  • And Anthony Trollope mentions Jael in his novel The Last Chronicle of Barset.
  • “In fact, just beforeJeevescame in, I had been dreaming that some bounder was driving spikes through my head—not just ordinary spikes, as used by Jael the wife of Heber, but red-hot ones.”
  • Bertie also mentions “Jael the wife of Heber” inRight Ho, Jeeves, and the rest of the Woosters. In The Code of the Woosters, the narratorBertie Woosterdescribe “Take, for example, Jael, the wife of Heber, as an example. While the visitor was sleeping, she dug spikes into his coconut and then strutted around the property like a Girl Guide. It’s no surprise that people say, ‘Oh, woman, woman!'” When Tipton Plimsoll shakes his head inGalahad at Blandings, the narrator observes that “there are times when shaking the head creates the illusion one has met Jael the wife of Heber, incurred her displeasure, and started her going into her celebrated routine.”
  • InCocktail Time, Frederick Twistleton describes the face of a member of the Drones Club as having “.a look of ecstasy and exalt In the first meeting between George Finch and his future wife, his prospective mother-in-law looks at him with a disapproving expression. Heber’s wife, Jael, may have caught a glimpse of Sisera’s shocked expression if he’d been quick enough to see it before she started operating with the spike.”
  • Winner of the Booker Prize The short story collection by A.S. Byatt published in 1998. Stories of Fire and Ice from the Elements It features a short narrative titled “Jael,” which is intimately tied to the biblical account of Jael
  • It also contains an epilogue. As part of a half-hour radio drama,Butter in a Lordly Dish(1948), author Agatha Christie has her protagonist drug a lawyer’s cup of coffee, after which she exposes her actual identity and hammers a nail into his skull. The novel’s core picture is created by Aritha van Herk. The Tent Peg alludes to the narrative of Jael and Sisera, which is told in the Bible. Martin Sugarman’s book has a chapter on The chapter “Daughters of Yael: Two Jewish Heroines of the SOE” in the book Fighting Back: British Jewry’s Military Contribution in the Second World War (Valentine Mitchell, 2010) is titled “Daughters of Yael: Two Jewish Heroines of the SOE.” ATSDenise Blochand’s bravery is demonstrated by the author by the choice of her given name. WAAF Muriel Byckof the Special Operation Executive, who was killed in combat while working behind German lines in France
  • Muriel Byckof the Special Operation Executive
  • Laurel Thatcher’s Laurel Thatcher “Jael” is the title of Ulrich’s bookGood Wives
  • The Christian metalcore band Testament is called “Jael.” Oh, and Sleeper has a song on their album called “Hush Yael” that you should listen to. Fireworks: The Children of Fire is a Showtime Original Series. In 2006, the character Yael Hoffman (Meital Dohan) appeared in the television show WEEDS. To avoid military service, Andy Botwin (Justin Kirk) enrolls in a Rabbinical school. While there, he meets Yael Hoffman, who becomes his girlfriend. During one episode, she explains to him the Biblical origins of her given name
  • Stephen Vincent Benet in his poem When the hot, dry hands went in search of the nail, John Brown’s Body alludes to Jael and her rage against an adversary. When a huge nail through the victim’s skull is driven into the floor, a sequence of murders is perpetrated in the episode “In Sight of the Lord” of the television series “Waking the Deads.” The biblical significance of the deed is investigated as part of the investigation into the killings.

References

  1. ‘Goode, Richard’ is a euphemism for “goode, Richard” (2019). “Wild Goat/Ibex” is a kind of goat or ibex. The Newman Research Center for the Bible and Its Reception is located in New York City. Obtainable on October 29, 2020
  2. In the article, “What are the most common Jewish baby names in Israel?” by Tikva Frymer-Kensky, she explains that “Jael” originates from the Bible. Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia, first published on March 1, 2009, at Accessed on April 25, 2020, from the Jewish Women’s Archive
  3. Ab Court of Appeals Judges Garcia Bachmann and Mercedes L. Collegeville, MN.ISBN978-0-8146-8106-0.OCLC1020027525
  4. Judges 4:11
  5. Sasson, Jack M. Garcia Bachmann, Mercedes L. Calderón Pilarski, Ahida, Reid, Barbara E. Collegeville, MN.ISBN978-0-8146-8106-0.OCLC1020027525
  6. (20 May 2014). Judges 1-12: A New Translation with an Introduction and Commentary is available online. Judges 4:17
  7. Barnes’ Notes on Judges 4, accessed 17 October 2016
  8. AbcNiditch, Susan. Yale University Press, pp. 271–272. ISBN 978-0-300-19033-5
  9. AbcNiditch, Susan. Yale University Press, pp. 271–272. ISBN 978-0- (2011). Comments on the judges’ decisions. Cox, Jennifer K., Louisville, KY.ISBN978-1-61164-493-7.OCLC961659873
  10. Halpern, Baruch, Louisville, KY.ISBN978-1-61164-493-7 (1983). These were the First Historians. Harper & Row Publishers, New York, New York
  11. s^ Michael D. Coogan is the author of this work (2009). a brief introduction to the Old Testament: the Hebrew Bible in its historical and cultural context On page 180 of Oxford University Press’s The Oxford Companion to the English Language, ISBN 978-0-19-533272-8
  12. Charlesworth, James (1985). Pseudo-Philo, Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum 31.7, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, Vol. 2, Anchor Bible, p. 1056, ISBN 978-0-385-18813-5
  13. Chaucer, Geoffrey, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, Vol. 2, Anchor Bible, p. 1056, ISBN 978-0-385-18813-5
  14. (2016). Winny and James are two of the most talented musicians in the world (ed.). The Prologue and the Tale of The Wife of Bath Schenk, C. E., “Jael,” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, (James Orr, ed.) 1915
  15. Matthews, Victor H. (1991). “Hospitality and Hostility in Judges 4.” Croydon: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1-316-61560-7
  16. Schenk, C. E., “Jael,” International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, (James Orr Lockyer, Herbert. “Jael,” All the Women of the Bible, Zondervan, 1967ISBN9780310281511
  17. Newsom, Carol Ann and Ringe, Sharon H.,Women’s Bible Commentary, Westminster John Knox Press, 1998, p.76ISBN978066425781
  18. Van Wijk-Bos, Johanna. “Jael,” All the Women of the Bible, Zondervan, 1967ISBN (2019). Joshua and Judges represent the culmination of the beginning. ISBN 978-0-8028-6838-1
  19. Wolfthal, Diane. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B Eerdmans Publishing Company, pp. 227–228. ISBN 978-0-8028-6838-1
  20. (2000). Imagery of Rape: The Heroic Tradition and its Alternate Interpretations ISBN 978-0-521-79442-8
  21. Bohn, Babette. Cambridge University Press, p. 123
  22. ISBN 978-0-521-79442-8 (2005). “Death, Dispassion, and the Female Hero: Gentileschi’s Jael and Sisera” is the topic of this episode of The Artemisia Files. In H Diane Russell (ed), Eva/Ave
  23. Women in Renaissance and Baroque Prints, pp. 36–39, 147–148, 154–155, National Gallery of Art, Washington 1990
  24. One illustrated below
  25. See also this example from Amsterdam in 1640
  26. Jal et Sisera at IMDb.com, December 15, 2010
  27. Jal et Sisera at IMDb.

Sources

It is included into this page through reference to text from a work now in the public domain:Easton, Matthew George (1897). Easton’s Bible Dictionary is a comprehensive resource for understanding the Bible (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson & Sons, Inc.

Further reading

  • It is based on material from a work that is now in the public domain: Easton, Matthew George (1897). Easton’s Bible Dictionary is a comprehensive resource for understanding the Bible’s historical context (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons is an American publishing company.

External links

It is included into this article through reference to text from a work now in the public domain: Easton, Matthew George (1897). Easton’s Bible Dictionary is a comprehensive resource for biblical knowledge (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons is a publishing company.

Judges 4:21 But as he lay sleeping from exhaustion, Heber’s wife Jael took a tent peg, grabbed a hammer, and went silently to Sisera. She drove the peg through his temple and into the ground, and he died.

New International Version (New International Version) Jael, Heber’s wife, however, gently approached him as he lay deep asleep and fatigued, picking up a tent peg and a hammer as she went. He died as a result of the peg she drove through his temple and into the earth. New Living Translation (New Living Translation) Sisera fell asleep from tiredness, and Jael walked up to him, hammer and tent peg in hand, silently creeping up to him. Then she drove the tent peg through his temple and into the ground, causing him to succumb to his injuries.

  1. When he fell asleep, she gently walked up to him and inserted the peg into his temple until it was firmly planted in the earth while he was deep asleep from exhaustion.
  2. Berean Study Bible (also known as the Berean Study Bible) His wife, Jael, took a tent peg and a hammer and walked discreetly to Sisera as he slept exhausted from the journey.
  3. The King James Version of the Bible So Jael Heber’s wife went over to him with a nail from the tent and a hammer in her hand, and walked lightly over to him, smoting the nail into his temples and fastening it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and exhausted.
  4. The New King James Version (sometimes known as the New King James Version) was published in 1611.
  5. Heber was deep asleep and exhausted at this point.
  6. The New American Standard Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.
  7. As a result, he died.
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As a result, he died.

As a result, he died.

As a result, he died.

During the time when Heber was sleeping due to tiredness, Jael, Heber’s wife, took a tent peg and hammer and went stealthily to Sisera to find him.

Holman The Christian Standard Bible is a translation of the Bible in the Christian tradition.

He died as a result of her hammering the peg into his temple and driving it into the earth.

He swooned and died as a result of the tent-pin being driven into his temples with a hammer by Jael Heber’s wife.

Translation of the Septuagint by Brenton And Jael, Chaber’s wife, got a pin from the tent and a hammer in her hand, and she went in secret to him and secured the pin in his temple, and the pin went through to the soil, and he fainted away, and darkness descended upon him, and he passed away.

When Jael was about to die, he grabbed a hammer and drove a tent-peg through his skull and into the earth.

With the hammer, he drove it through his head and into the earth, and as he transitioned from deep slumber to death, he fell away and passed away in the process.

In the following moment, Jael approached him silently, grabbed a tent peg and drove it through the side of his skull and into the ground, thus killing him.

That’s how he passed away.

He swooned and died as a result of the tent-pin being driven into his temples with a hammer by Jael Heber’s wife.

The New American Bible is a translation of the New Testament into English.

He died as a result of the peg being driven through his temple and into the ground while Sisera was in a deep sleep due to exhaustion.

Heber’s wife Jael then took a tent peg in one hand and a hammer in the other and began hammering away.

Revised Standard Version (New Revised Standard Version) His wife, Jael, took a tent peg and a hammer and went softly to him, driving the peg into his temple until it went down into the ground—he was fast asleep from exhaustion at the time—and he died as a result of the wound.

Because he was sleeping, Jael Heber’s wife took a tent peg and struck it into his temples with a hammer.

The English Bible for the Whole World He swooned and died as a result of this.

He was in a deep sleep at the time.

Translations in addition to the above.

20 Standing at the tent entrance, he instructed, “if anyone approaches you and asks, ‘Is there a man here?,’ simply respond, ‘No.” Heber’s wife Jael, however, took a tent peg, a hammer, and walked silently to Sisera, while he lay sleeping from exhaustion on the ground.

22 When Barak arrived in pursuit of Sisera, Jael went out to greet him and told him, “Come, and I will show you the man you are looking for.” “Come, and I will show you the man you are looking for,” she said.

… References to Other Sources 4:9 (Judges 4:9) In response, Deborah said, “I will go with you without hesitation,” but she added, “the road you are going to take will bring you no honor, because the LORD will sell Sisera into the hands of a woman.” As a result, Deborah rose and accompanied Barak to Kedesh.

“Stand at the entrance to the tent,” he instructed, “and if anyone comes up to you and asks, ‘Is there a man here?’ simply respond, ‘No.'” He added that 4:22 (Judges 4) When Barak arrived in pursuit of Sisera, Jael went out to greet him and told him, “Come, and I will show you the man you are looking for.” “Come, and I will show you the man you are looking for,” she said.

5:26 (Judges 5:26) She reached for the tent peg with her left hand, and for the workman’s hammer with her right.

The Scriptures are a treasure trove.

As a result, he died.

And Ehud extended his left hand, snatched the dagger from his right thigh, and thrust it into his stomach: … 5:26 (Judges 5:26) Her left hand was on the nail, her right hand on the workmen’s hammer, and she hit Sisera with the hammer, smiting off his head after she had pierced and struck through his temples with the hammer.

  • Exodus 35:18 is a biblical passage.
  • Psalm 3:7 (KJV) Come, O LORD; deliver me from my persecutors’ hands, O my God.
  • He passed away.
  • (21) After that.
  • Making such an assumption as a means of defending an act of assassination that was both particularly awful and very deceitful appears to be completely unjustified in the extreme.
  • It will be rather easy for a mind that has not been exposed to the casuistry of exegesis to arrive at a reasonable judgment of Jael’s actions without resorting to potentially harmful and arbitrary interpolations of speculation into the straightforward Scripture narrative.
  • – Despite the fact that it is unnecessary, this addition might be seen as emphatic and as implying an element of censure by drawing particular attention to the “peace between Jabin and the family of Heber,” which has been noted when his name appears for the final time (Judges 4:17).

a nail in the tent’s frame.

Despite the fact that Josephus refers to it as a “iron nail,” there is no evidence that it was made of iron or wood, and the LXX.

A hammer, to be precise.

Every tent is equipped with a hefty wooden mallet that is used to knock down the cord-pegs.

The warrior-priests who were given that title were the “hammers” of their enemies, and Karl was given the title of Martel for a similar reason.

Sisera had laid him down to slumber after taking all necessary precautions; unlike David, he had not placed his faith in the Lord to keep him safe, but had instead placed his confidence in Jael’s friendship and his own cunning guidance.

He swooned and died without putting up any resistance.

It is the same word as the one that is rendered as lit.

Put a full-stop afterasleep at the end of the final clause, and read, As a result, he swooned and died.

Parallel Commentaries.

Pronoun – third person male singular in the conjunctive waw |

The conjunctive waw |

Strength 5774: To fly, to be frightened Heber’sחֶ֠בֶר(ḥe·ḇer) Noun – appropriate – male single grammatical gender Strong’s 2268:Heber – a Kenite who was also associated with various Israelites.

Jaelיָעֵ֣ל(yā·‘êl) Noun – proper – feminine singular Noun – proper – feminine singular A woman from Canaan, according to Strong’s 3278: Jael tookוַתִּקַּ֣ח(wat·tiq·qaḥ) In the third person feminine singular, the conjunctive waw is used to express the verb Qal in the consecutive imperfect.

Article |

In the third person feminine singular, the conjunctive waw is used to express the verb Qal in the consecutive imperfect.

Noun – feminine singular grammatical form In Strong’s 4718, there is a perforator, hammer, a perforation, a quarry, and a quarryand went (wattw) together.

Strong’s 935: to enter, enter, enter, enter, enter, enter, enter, enter, enter, enter, travel silently (ball) Preposition-b, Article |

third-person masculine singular in the third person Strong’s 413:near, with, amid, or in relation to She drove (wattiqa’) a car, which she owned.

Strong’s 8628: To clatter, slap, and clang, to drive, and to become a bondsman are all examples of this.

Noun – feminine single grammatical form One of Strong’s 3489: a peg that pins through his temple בְּרַקָּת֔וֹ (bə·raq·qā·ṯōw) Preposition-b |

Third person masculine singular |

In the third person feminine singular, the conjunctive waw is used to express the verb Qal in the consecutive imperfect.

Noun – feminine singular |

וַיָּמֹֽת׃(way·yā·mōṯ) The conjunctive waw |

Strong’s 4191: To perish, to be killed PreviousAsleep is a state of mind DeepDied HammerHand JaelNailPegPi StruckSoftlyStruckSoftlyStruckSoftlyStruckSoftlyStruckTemplesTentTent-PinWearyWifeJump to NextAwakeDeepDiedHammerHandAsleepDeepDiedHammerHandAsleepDeepDiedHammerHand JaelNailPegPiercedPinSeizedSleepSmoteSoftlyStruckSwoonedTemplesTentTent -PinWearyWifeLinks Judges 4:21 New International Version Judges 4:21 (New International Version) Judges 4:21 (New International Version) Judges 4:21 NASBJ (National Association of State Boards of Justice) udges 4:21 King James Version 4:21 (Judges 4:21) BibleApps.com Judges 4:21 (Biblical Reference) Paralela 4:21 (Judges 4:21) The Chinese version of the Bible Judges 4:21 in the French version of the Bible 4:21 (Judges 4:21) The Bible according to Catholic tradition Judges 4:21 in the Old Testament.

After that, Jael Heber’s wife went and got a tent (Jd Judg. Jdg)

5 Powerful Lessons from the Unusual Story of Jael

Jael is one of those ladies in the Bible about whom we don’t receive a lot of background information or specifics. Aside from the tale of her story, the only thing we know for certain about her is that she was a Bedouin and the wife of Heber the Kenite. The name Jael is derived from the Hebrew word for “mountain goat.” Before we can go any farther with Jael’s story, we must first discuss the events that were taking place in Israel at the time. Israel was embroiled in a conflict with the Canaanites.

Deborah and Barak

At the period, a prophetess named Deborah presided as judge over Israel, and the people of Israel turned to her for assistance in legal concerns. The book of Judges 4:6 informs us that she called a man named Barak, whom God picked to be the commander of Israel’s army in the battle against Jabin’s armies. Sisera was the leader of the Canaanite army and served as its commander. The Israelites were subjected to twenty years of oppression by this powerful and wicked tyrant. Deborah went on to tell Barak to gather his men for the battle, to which Barak responded in the following way: “If you will go with me, I will go; if you will not go with me, I will not go.” Deborah then went on to tell Barak to gather his men for the battle, to which Barak responded in the following way: Judges 4:8 (KJV) Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and is in the public domain.

A Woman to Get the Glory – Jael’s Violent Victory

During this historical period, a prophetess named Deborah served as judge over Israel, and the people of Israel turned to her for assistance in legal concerns. The book of Judges 4:6 informs us that she called a man named Barak, whom God picked to be the commander of Israel’s army in their battle against Jabin’s armies. Sisera was the Canaanite army’s supreme commander. The Israelites were subjected to his brutality and authority for a period of twenty years. “If you will go with me, I will go, but if you do not want to go with me, I will not go.” Deborah then instructed Barak to collect his troops for the war, to which Barak answered, “If you will go with me, I will go, but if you do not want to go with me, I will not go.” (Judges 4:8, NIV) Wikimedia Commons has licensed this image for public use.

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Jael’s Opportunity

Jaelsa recognized a chance to act and took advantage of it. According to Judges 4:21-22, “But Jael the wife of Heber took a tent peg and a hammer in her hand, and she struck it with them.” When he fell asleep, she gently walked up to him and inserted the peg into his temple until it was firmly planted in the earth while he was deep asleep from exhaustion. As a result, he died. In the midst of this, Jael came out to meet Barak and told him, “Come with me and I will show you the guy whom you are looking for.” “Come with me and I will show you the man whom you are looking for,” she added.

Although this one act did not bring the battle to a close, it marked the beginning of the end of the Canaanite empire’s rule over Israel. So, what can we take away from the narrative of this heroic woman? Thinkstock provided the image used in this post.

1. Act on the opportunities God puts in front of you.

In the heat of the moment, Jael’s actions did not make sense. A horrible act of betrayal was committed when she took a refugee inside her tent, showed him kindness, and made him feel comfortable, only to kill him later. We don’t know if Jael had the intention of killing Sisera from the beginning. She may have simply been attempting to put him off so that anyone chasing him could catch up with him. Perhaps it was when she didn’t see anybody chasing after him that she came to a choice. That she didn’t dither when it came time to make a decision is essential since it shows determination.

She had to push aside all of her fears and all of the “what-ifs.” When the Holy Spirit pushes us to act, we typically don’t have much time to consider our options.

That is why we must make a decision in our hearts that when the time comes, we will answer God’s call to serve him.

2. Use the tools you’re been given.

Under the circumstances, Jael had no other option than to use a tent peg as a weapon. Because she was in a women’s tent, there were no firearms in the immediate vicinity of her campsite. She was also likely to have a great deal of experience putting up tents with tent pegs, indicating that she was knowledgeable about this instrument. She made advantage of the resources that God had provided her in this predicament. She didn’t spend any time thinking, “If only I had a sword,” as she walked away.

  1. God provides His people with the tools they need to do the tasks He has placed in front of them.
  2. His grace guarantees that we are prepared even when we don’t feel competent, equipped, or prepared, all for the purpose of His glory.
  3. Our God, on the other hand, is sovereign, and we may put our faith in Him to provide us with competence.
  4. It is He who has qualified us to serve as ministers of the new covenant — not the covenant in word but in spirit; because the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life.

3. Some things are more important than following rules.

Jael’s betrayal of Sisera was a significant act of betrayal on his behalf. Her actions went completely against all she understood about hospitality, which was a value that was quite important to her society at the time. Despite this, she responded positively to God’s prompting. We merely need to move forward in the Bible to the life of Jesus in order to read additional tales about rules being breached. Don’t get me wrong: Jesus never disobeyed the commandments in order to be impolite or to anger others unnecessarily.

He slammed religious leaders for imposing unreasonable obligations on the individuals who listened to their sermons.

Matthew 8:3 (Matthew 8:3) He performed healing on the Sabbath, despite the fact that no labor was meant to be done.

(Matthew 3:1–6) Let us learn from His (and Jael’s) example and avoid becoming so engrossed in obeying religious and cultural standards that we lose sight of God’s mandate to confront evil and oppression in the world.

4. Our highest motive should be honoring God.

Jael did not kill Sisera out of personal animosity or vengeance on his part. As a matter of fact, the Bible states that Jael’s people (the Kenites) lived in harmony with the Canaanites. That implies that Jael should have been Sisera’s buddy, rather than the other way around. Jael’s motivations for killing Sisera aren’t explicitly stated in the Bible, but we may infer that she had a cause that was more important to her than forming an earthly alliance, and that objective had to do with respecting God.

According to 1 Corinthians 10:31.

Furthermore, eating and drinking are rather trivial activities.

Thinkstock provided the image used in this post.

5. Jael’s story is a metaphor for how we should fight our spiritual battles.

Today’s war isn’t against a specific individual; rather, it is against the forces of evil. According to Ephesians 6:12, “For we do not struggle against flesh and blood, but against rulers, against authorities, against cosmic powers over this present darkness, against spiritual forces of evil in the high realms.” The war against sin is the most important conflict we will ever face in our life. Charles Spurgeon once gave a lecture in which he equated the biblical character Sisera to sin. According to his teachings, we should not be happy to just see our faults escaping from us; rather, we should be prepared to chase them and then drive them into the ground—dead—with a nail, in the manner of Jaeldid.

The cross should always be within reach, and we should be prepared to go to him, confess our sins, and then revel in the victory of the cross.

It was this that he removed from the scene and nailed on the cross.

He is the one who gives us life; he is the one who forgives us our debts; he is the one who nails our sins to the cross once and for all, and he is the one who gives us eternal life.

Jael had her priorities straight.

All of these considerations may be summed up in two words: God comes first. We must value His heavenly principles above our earthly religious rules, and His voice over what we believe to be proper in our own eyes. We must place greater emphasis on His glory and competency than on our own. Jael was a woman who knew what I was talking about. Although she just receives a few lines of Scripture, there is a great deal to be learned from her. What kind of society would we live in if we took advantage of chances, used our resources, liberated the downtrodden, revered God, and battled like Jael did?

During her spare time, you’ll most likely find her writing, lifting weights, or cooing over her adorable kitty.

Lightstock provided the image.

We’ve put together this collection of articles to assist you in your study of individuals whom God decided to lay before us as examples in His Word.

May their faith and walks with God boost and encourage your own. What was Melchizedek’s significance, and why was he so revered? Queen Esther’s Biblical Story is a must-read. Ruth’s Life – 5 Essential Faith Lessons to Take Away 3 Interesting Facts About Mary That You Didn’t Know (Mother of Jesus)

What Does Judges 4:21 Mean? “Then Jael Heber’s wife took a tent-pin, and took a hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the pin into his temples, and it pierced through .”

  • DEBORAH AND BARAK SAVE ISRAEL FROM JABIN AND SISERA IN CHAPTER 4 (Judges 4:1-17). 1. Israel’s children continued to do wrong in the eyes of the Lord after Ehud died. -The death of the diligent judge Ehud left his enamored people without the restriction of religious law once again. 2, 3. Jabin, king of Canaan – “Jabin” is a regal title that dates back to ancient times (Joshua 11:10Joshua 11:11). They had recovered from the consequences of their calamitous defeat during the reign of Joshua, and they had now won in their turn against Israel. This was the most terrible tyranny to which Israel had ever been subjected during its history. However, it was the tribes in the north who bore the brunt of it, and it was only after twenty years of grueling service that they came to see it as a punishment for their sins and a call to God for relief that they began to see the light. The fourth person in this group is Deborah, who was a prophetess. She was a woman of extraordinary knowledge, wisdom, and piety, who had been instructed in divine knowledge by the Spirit and had become accustomed to interpret His will
  • She gained widespread influence and was universally respected, to the point that she was regarded as the animating spirit of government, discharging all special judicial duties, with the exception of military leadership. the wife of Lapidoth, who has been referred to be “a woman of splendors” by some. 5. She lived in a grove of palm trees, which is referred to as a “palm-grove.” Administration of justice in the open air or under the canopy of an umbrageous tree is still typical practice in the Middle East and North Africa today.6. she despatched and summoned Barak -in exercise of her formal powers as a judge. Kedesh-naphtali is a town in northern Israel that is situated on a rocky outcrop a short distance north of the Sea of Galilee. It was given this name to distinguish it from another Kedesh in Issachar. Isn’t it true that the Lord God of Israel has commanded? -a Hebrew expression for conveying a strong message. Draw a line toward Mount Tabor, an isolated peak in Galilee located in the northeastern corner of the plain of Esdraelon, and go as far as possible. It was a handy location for a gathering, and the enrollment should not be regarded restricted to ten thousand men, albeit a lesser number would have been insufficient in the circumstances. Deborah’s presence was not entirely a result of Barak’s unusual request to be escorted by her. The Orientals always bring their most prized possessions to the battlefield with them, believing that doing so helps them fight better. The policy of Barak to have the prophetess present is absolutely understandable since it would no less encourage the heroism of the men than it would sanction, in the eyes of Israel, the rebellion against such a great tyrant as Jabin, and therefore is perfectly understandable. 9) The Lord will sell Sisera into the hands of a woman -This was a forecast that Barak couldn’t comprehend at the moment, but the tone of it conveyed a warning against his unmanly worries. It is not uncommon for pastoral tribes to feed their flocks on the extensive commons that lie in the heart of inhabited countries, even in modern times. 11. Now, Heber the Kenite. pitched his tent -It is not uncommon, even in modern times, for pastoral tribes to feed their flocks on the extensive commons that lie in the heart of inhabited countries. The campsite was located in the highland valley of Kedesh, behind a grove of oaks, known as terebinths, which provided shade. 13. the river of Kishon – The plain on its bank was chosen as the battlefield by Sisera himself, who was lured there unwittingly as a result of the defeat of his army in the previous fight. It is a startling demonstration of the complete trust Barak and his warriors had in Deborah’s guarantee of triumph that they surrendered their favorable position on the hill and rushed into the plain in the face of the iron chariots they had dreaded so much, as they did. In verse 15, the Lord discomfited Sisera, or in Hebrew, “threw his army into disarray,” meaning that soldiers, horses, and chariots were all mixed together in a state of chaotic turmoil. It was because of a supernatural panic that Sisera was forced to abandon his chariot and flee on foot. He realized that his chariot, which was probably distinguished by its superior size and elegance, would betray the rank of its rider, and he realized that his only hope of escaping was to flee on foot. 16. But Barak followed. all the way to Harosheth -Breached and beaten, the main bulk of Sisera’s army fled northward
  • Some were driven into the 17th and 18th battles, respectively. Sisera fled. to the tent of Jael -According to nomadic custom, it is the sheik’s wife who has the responsibility of receiving the stranger while the sheik is away, and the moment the stranger is admitted into his tent, his claim to be defended or concealed from his pursuers is established by the sheik’s wife. -Sisera counted on this as a guarantee of his protection, especially under the tent of a friendly sheik, and she. brought him drink and covered him. Having had refreshments and been welcomed inside the inner, or women’s, apartment, this commitment was by far the most powerful that could be sought or procured. 20. He told her that if any guy came up to her and asked, “Is there a man here?” he would answer, “Is there a man here?” It is necessary for you to say no – The seclusion of the harem, even if it is in a tent, cannot be intruded upon without the approval of the harem. In the following scene, Jael takes hold of a nail from the tent, most likely one of the pins with which the tent ropes are secured to the ground. Sisera’s chances of escaping were little to none. However, the taking of his life by Jael’s hand was considered murder. All of the ideals of respect and friendship that are normally held holy among pastoral people were directly violated, and it is inconceivable to see a lady in Jael’s situation having any other motivation than to earn favor with the victorious party, which is what she did. The fact that it was predicted by Deborah did not imply that it was the result of divine appointment or sanction
  • And while it is praised in the song, it must be understood as a tribute to the woman’s moral character and her deed, rather than to the public benefits that would accrue as a result of her actions due to the overruling providence of God.
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What Woman Put A Tent Peg In

Jael had assured Sisera that she would hide him and had covered him with a rug; nevertheless, when he had fallen asleep, she struck him in the temple with a tent peg with such power that the peg forced his head to the ground.

What woman drove a tent peg through his temple?

Sisera requested Jael for a glass of water, but she instead handed him a glass of milk. He instructed Jael to keep an eye on the tent and inform anyone who inquired that no one was present. Jael entered Sisera’s temple when he was sleeping and used a mallet to drive a tent peg through the temple and into the earth, killing him immediately.

What did Deborah do in the Bible?

Deborah is mentioned in the Book of Judges as a prophet, a judge of Israel, and the wife of Lapidoth, according to the text. In the shade of a date palm tree somewhere between Ramah in Benjamin and Bethel in the province of Ephraim, she delivered her verdict.

Did Jael sleep with Sisera?

Debra was a prophet, a judge of Israel, and the wife of the king of Israel, according to the Book of Judges. It was under a date palm tree between Ramah in Benjamin and Bethel in the province of Ephraim that she delivered her decisions.

Is Barak a biblical name?

B-R-Q is a Hebrew given name that derives from the root B-R-Q (Hebrew: b-r-q; Arabic: b-r-q ), which means “lightning,” and it appears in the Hebrew Bible as the given name of an Ancient Israelite general named Barak (Hebrew: b-r-q).

How did Deborah kill the enemy general Sisera?

Jael assassinates Sisera in his sleep after successfully persuading him to conceal himself behind a carpet. In contrast, the ancient “Song of Deborah,” according to Frymer-Kensky, “shows none of this anxiety about female fighters.”

Where is the tribe of Dan?

The tract of land allocated to the tribe of Dan was a territory west of the city of Jerusalem, according to the Bible. Eventually, at least some of the tribe migrated to the far northeast and conquered the city of Laish, which they renamed Dan. The city of Beersheba became a point of reference in the popular term “from Dan to Beersheba” since it was the northernmost Israelite city.

Why did Jael give Sisera milk instead of water?

Judges 4:19–5:25: Evidently, Jael understood the hypnagogic properties of milk, and so when the thirsty Sisera begged for water, she instead gave him full fat (or curdled) milk in a gorgeous bowl in order to put him to sleep and therefore kill him more quickly (see Judges 4:19–5:25).

Why did Barak want Deborah to go with him?

Deborah was selected to accompany Barak because of her spiritual relationship with God. Some scholars interpret this as evidence of Barak’s lack of moral courage, while others see it as evidence of Barak’s foresight, given that Deborah was seen as a mediator between God and mankind.

Who is the first female prophetess in the Bible?

He was referred to as Huldah in the Hebrew Bible in 2 Kings 22:14–20 and 2 Chronicles 34:22–28. Huldah was a prophet who appeared in 2 Kings 22:14–20 as well as 2 Chronicles 34:22–28. The prophetesses Sarah, Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Abigail, and Esther were all considered to be among the “seven prophetesses,” according to Jewish tradition.

Who defeated the Canaanites?

Eventually, under the leadership of King David (10th century bce), the Israelites were able to overthrow the Philistine Empire while also defeating the native Canaanites and capturing the city of Jerusalem.

Following that, Canaan was officially designated as the Land of Israel for all practical reasons.

How did God subdue Jabin?

Until Deborah and Barak stirred the national spirit and rallied an army of ten thousand soldiers, they were able to defeat Jabin in the plain of Esdraelon (Judges 4:10 – 16; see also Psalm 83:9), the whole community was paralyzed by dread and despair (Judges 5:6 – 11).

What woman in the Bible drove a stake through his head?

This is the time period during which one of the most brutally recorded killings in the Old Testament occurred. When confronted with a guy who was physically stronger than she was, Jael utilized her skills and courage to outwit and outlast him. She took the wooden hammer and pounded the steel tent pegs that kept the tent ropes in place, then drove the peg into Sisera’s head with a single stroke.

Who is a wise woman in the Bible?

The wise lady of Abel is a biblical person who goes nameless in the Hebrew Bible. 2 Samuel 20: Sheba is pursued by Joab to the city of Abel-beth-maachah, where she is encountered by the prophet Joab. The lady, who lives in Abel, convenes a meeting with Joab, who pledges to leave the city if Sheba is turned up to him; however, this is not the case.

What did Deborah say to Barak?

Hebrew tradition refers to her as the wise lady of Abel, but she is not given a name. 2 Samuel 20: Sheba is pursued by Joab to the city of Abel-beth-maachah, where she is encountered by the prophet. In the course of her conversation with Joab, who pledges to leave the city if Sheba is delivered up to him, the lady, who resides in Abel, provokes a confrontation.

Who was the first judge of Israel?

OthnielOthniel Othniel from the “Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum” Othniel from the “Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum” First Judge of Israel under Occupation Ehud is the successor to none of his predecessors.

What two nations did Gideon fight?

Originally from the Abiezrite line of the tribe of Manasseh, Gideon lived in Ephrata as the son of Joash. He was the grandson of Joash (Ophrah). As a commander of the Israelites, he led a group of 300 ‘valiant’ warriors to a decisive victory over a Midianite army, despite the fact that they were vastly outnumbered.

Who offered his only daughter for a burnt offering?

She is a character in the Hebrew Bible whose narrative is told in Judges 11. She is also known as Seila or Iphis, depending on who you ask. Judge Jephthah had just triumphed against the Ammonites and pledged to Yahweh that the first item that came out of his home would be offered as a burnt sacrifice to the Lord.

What seed did Manna look like?

Manna is said to have the look of bdellium, according to certain accounts. In the book of Exodus, manna is described as being the size of a coriander seed, but it is white in color (this is explained by ancient commentaries as a comparison to the round shape of the coriander seed).

How did God fulfill Deborah’s prophecy to Barak?

Heber the Kenite’s tent (the Kenites were a nomadic tribe who were purportedly at peace with Canaan); he is granted safety by Heber’s wife, Jael, who pierces his head with a tent peg and kills him (thereby fulfilling Deborah’s prophecy).

What is the English name for Yael?

Iael, Iael, Jael, Jael, Yael, Iael, Iael, Iael, Iael (Greek) Yael (Hebrew: , pronounced; often written Jael) is a female given name derived from the Hebrew word for “Nubian Ibex,” which means “Nubian Ibex.”

What does Deborah mean?

Deborah (Hebrew: ) is a feminine given name derived from the Hebrew word D’vorah, which means “bee.” Deborah is a popular name for women.

Deborah was a biblical heroine and prophetess who appeared in the Book of Judges in the Old Testament. The name was most prevalent in the United States from 1950 and 1970, when it was in the top 20 most common girl’s names.

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