What Is A Remote Tent

Remote™ 2 Two-Person Mountaineering Tent

What does it mean to be “waterproof” in a tent, and what does the “mm” rating on a tent indicate? Waterproof refers to the fact that all exterior fabric has been treated with our superior polyurethane coatings and that the seams are watertight right out of the bag in the case of an MSR tent. In this case, “mm” refers to millimeters and is used in conjunction with a number to signify an internationally recognized standard measurement of how waterproof a coating is. Using the example of a 1500mm coating, it will be possible to tolerate a 1500mm (5′) column of water for more than one minute before even a single drop appears through the fabric.

What are the meanings of the letters D and T following the fabrics?

The lower numbers are lighter and finer, while the higher numbers are heavier and rougher.

In terms of fabric weave, the lower numbers describe a loosely woven fabric, while the higher numbers suggest a firmly woven fabric The combination of these two figures can assist to determine the strength and feel of a piece of cloth.

  1. With a “flat” end and a “pointed” end, the 7-point shape is aesthetically pleasing.
  2. In order to create a covered space, the opposing “flat edge,” which is composed of three points, may be extended firmly and fastened to a shelter, vehicle rack, or even the pole-supported vestibule of a tent.
  3. For the cable storage compartments, you may use paddles and sticks (which also function well).
  4. What is the point of getting a footprint?
  5. Made to match each individual model, it not only keeps your tent floor clean and dry, but it also protects the ground beneath the tent from excessive abrasion, helping to extend its useful life and reduce wear and tear.
  6. What is the best way to store my tent?
  7. Despite the fact that we utilize the finest polyurethane waterproofing available, extended contact to moisture promotes hydrolysis, which, in turn, causes the waterproof layer to break down, becoming squishy, sticky, and no longer effective as a waterproofing barrier.

Mildew will cause your tent to discolor and smell, and it will also cause the waterproof covering to break down prematurely.

Keep your tent in a dry, cool location away from direct sunlight if you intend to store it for an extended period of time.

An old pillowcase is an excellent option for those on a tight budget.

The use of guy ropes in your tent will increase its stability in windy or harsh weather situations while also increasing its breathability.

Pass the cord around the stake and back through the tensioner, being sure to maintain the curved side of the tensioner facing toward the stake throughout.

To tighten the cord, draw the tensioner up the length of the cord and then release the tensioner.

What causes condensation in a tent, and how can I minimize it when camping? Condensation is the accumulation of moisture within your tent as a result of temperature changes between the interior and outside of your tent. There are three primary sources of information:

  • Weather Conditions: High humidity, low temperatures, and wet weather conditions are the most conducive to condensation production. During the night, we create around 1 – 2 quarts of moisture from our breathing and skin evaporation. In a damp environment, moist ground or wet goods stowed inside the tent are both acceptable.

While there is no tent design that can completely prevent condensation, ventilation is the key to decreasing it. In order for your tent to function properly, cooler, drier air must enter and warm, damp air must depart. We’ve come up with a number of different approaches of accomplishing this. To begin, the tent’s body and roof are comprised of textiles that are both breathable and mesh. This makes it possible for moisture to escape from the interior of the tent. It must, however, be able to exit the waterproof fly, and every MSR rainfly is equipped with a peak vent that gives protection from the elements while yet allowing for the unrestricted movement of important fresh air through your tent.

  1. Always leave at least two vents open, if possible, to allow any wind to offer cross-flow ventilation for the best possible circulation.
  2. What causes condensation in a tent is demonstrated in this video.
  3. The amount of time you spend in a tent is directly proportional to its longevity.
  4. The lifespan of a tent that is used in harsh circumstances at high altitude, such as Everest Base Camp, is limited to a few months, but a well-maintained tent that is used very rarely in regular conditions can endure for several years.
  5. It is not required to clean your tent unless it emits an undesirable odor or becomes highly filthy and soiled.
  6. Set up your tent and hand wash it with warm water, a sponge, and a light, non-detergent soap if you need to do more extensive cleaning.
  7. Make sure to thoroughly rinse.

Tents should never be dry cleaned, machine washed, or machine dried.

What are the packaging weights and minimum weight requirements?

Packaging weight, in line with this standard, refers to the overall weight of the packaged items when they are taken off the shelf.

In many cases, the rainfly, poles, and footprint are all that are required to set up an MSR camping tent.

More information regarding packaging weight vs.

Why do real weights occasionally differ from weights that have been published?

As a result, you may discover that your tent weighs a few ounces more or less than the weight specified on the packaging.

Variations in coatings and textiles might result in minor weight discrepancies throughout the production process, depending on the application.

In the case of lightweight tents, this corresponds to only an ounce or two of weight. In larger tents, the price might be a little more. Here are a few possible explanations for the weight discrepancies:

  • Condensation cannot be eliminated by any tent design
  • Nonetheless, ventilation is critical in minimizing it. In order for your tent to function properly, cooler, drier air must enter and warm, damp air must exit. It is our intention to do this in a number of ways. To begin, the tent’s body and roof are comprised of textiles that are both breathable and mesh in construction. In this way, moisture may be expelled from the interior of your tent. However, it must be able to exit the waterproof fly, and every MSR rainfly is equipped with a peak vent that gives protection from the elements while also allowing for the free flow of necessary fresh air to circulate throughout the tent. It’s also possible to keep a door open in nice weather, or to use the double sliders on the doors to allow warm and wet air to escape from the top of the house, where it likes to collect. Always leave at least two vents open, if feasible, to allow any wind to offer cross-flow ventilation for the best possible circulation of air. In hot or humid weather, gussying up your rainfly will also help to improve ventilation. What causes condensation in a tent is demonstrated in the video. A tent’s lifespan is determined by its materials. Indirectly, the amount of time you spend in your tent determines how long it will last. UV radiation is the tent’s most dangerous adversary (just like your skin). The lifespan of a tent that is used in harsh circumstances at high altitude, such as Everest Base Camp, is limited to a few months, but a well-maintained tent that is used very rarely in regular conditions can endure for many years. The most effective method of cleaning my tent is as follows: Except if your tent emits an undesirable odor or becomes highly filthy, it is not required to clean it after use. If the area is significantly filthy, the pressure with a standard garden hose will remove the majority of the loose dirt. Set up your tent and hand wash it with warm water, a sponge, and a light, non-detergent soap if you need to do a more thorough cleaning. Dishwashing liquid, detergent, bleach, pre-soaking solutions, or spot removers should not be used on this surface. Thoroughly rinse. Pitching or hanging your tent to dry can help to keep it dry. Tents should never be dry cleaned, machine washed, or dried by machine. A tent’s waterproof coatings can be removed using any of the procedures listed above. Was there a minimum weight for packaging and what was the maximum weight allowed? When it comes to these two tent industry terminologies, we at MSR voluntarily adhere to the ASTM International F 1934-98 standard. This standard defines packed weight as the total weight of the packaged goods when they are removed from the shelf. While the minimum weight of a tent is determined by its body, its rainfly (if applicable), and its tent poles, it does not include any of the additional materials that may be included in the box, such as tent pegs, guy rope, and a stuff sack. In many cases, the rainfly, poles, and footprint are all that are required to set up an MSR camping tent. We refer to this non-industry standard setup option as our FastLight weight in our tent specs. Check out our blog article on the subject to learn more about packaging weight vs. minimum, as well as the production procedures that can have an impact. Because of this, real weights may occasionally differ from those published. MSR, like other manufacturers, must make informed assumptions as to what the final weights of our tents will be, despite our efforts to be as precise as possible with our advertised weights. In order to account for this, you may notice that your tent weighs slightly more or less than the weight specified on the packaging. Due to the nature of the product, such differences are frequent among tents. Variations in coatings and textiles might result in slight weight discrepancies throughout the production process. If you’re talking about lightweight tents, this translates to a few ounces or less in weight. The cost might be a little more with bigger tents. Some of the causes for the weight discrepancies include the following:

Please see our blog post on the issue of tent weights for additional information on how we determine tent weights. What happens if one of my poles snaps or becomes damaged? If a tent pole breaks, you may use the pole repair sleeve to create a temporary splint to keep it from falling over. Slide the repair sleeve over the fractured section and keep it in place with tape or a stick to prevent it from moving. What can I do to keep mildew at bay? One of the most common ways to cause damage to your tent is to fail to dry it as fast as possible after it has been wet.

  • Mildew can cause the waterproof coatings to split from the fabric, leading them to be permanently damaged.
  • Mildew stains are difficult to remove.
  • If your tent seems dry after usage, it is always wise to double-check that it is entirely dry before putting it away for the winter.
  • Never dry your tent in the washing machine since the heat might cause the fabric to melt.

Remote™ 3 Three-Person Mountaineering Tent

Please see our blog post on the topic of tent weights for more information on how we define tent weights! If one of my support poles breaks, what happens next? A temporary splint can be made out of a tent pole repair sleeve in the event of a broken tent pole. Repair Sleeve: Slide the repair sleeve over the broken section and secure it in place with tape or a stick. What can I do to keep mildew from forming on my clothes? Not drying your tent as quickly as possible after it has been wet is one of the most straightforward ways to cause damage.

  • Mildew can cause the waterproof coatings to separate from the fabric, causing them to be permanently damaged.
  • Mildew stains are difficult to get rid of once they appear.
  • However, even if your tent appears to be dry after being used, you should always make certain that it is completely dry before putting it away.
  • Never dry your tent in the washing machine because the heat can cause the fabric to deteriorate and melt.
  • Weather Conditions: High humidity, low temperatures, and wet weather conditions are the most conducive to condensation production. During the night, we create around 1 – 2 quarts of moisture from our breathing and skin evaporation. In a damp environment, moist ground or wet goods stowed inside the tent are both acceptable.
See also:  How Safe Is A Tent In Lightning

While there is no tent design that can completely prevent condensation, ventilation is the key to decreasing it. In order for your tent to function properly, cooler, drier air must enter and warm, damp air must depart. We’ve come up with a number of different approaches of accomplishing this. To begin, the tent’s body and roof are comprised of textiles that are both breathable and mesh. This makes it possible for moisture to escape from the interior of the tent. It must, however, be able to exit the waterproof fly, and every MSR rainfly is equipped with a peak vent that gives protection from the elements while yet allowing for the unrestricted movement of important fresh air through your tent.

  • Always leave at least two vents open, if possible, to allow any wind to offer cross-flow ventilation for the best possible circulation.
  • What causes condensation in a tent is demonstrated in this video.
  • The amount of time you spend in a tent is directly proportional to its longevity.
  • The lifespan of a tent that is used in harsh circumstances at high altitude, such as Everest Base Camp, is limited to a few months, but a well-maintained tent that is used very rarely in regular conditions can endure for several years.
  • It is not required to clean your tent unless it emits an undesirable odor or becomes highly filthy and soiled.
  • Set up your tent and hand wash it with warm water, a sponge, and a light, non-detergent soap if you need to do more extensive cleaning.
  • Make sure to thoroughly rinse.

Tents should never be dry cleaned, machine washed, or machine dried.

What are the packaging weights and minimum weight requirements?

Packaging weight, in line with this standard, refers to the overall weight of the packaged items when they are taken off the shelf.

In many cases, the rainfly, poles, and footprint are all that are required to set up an MSR camping tent.

More information regarding packaging weight vs.

Why do real weights occasionally differ from weights that have been published?

As a result, you may discover that your tent weighs a few ounces more or less than the weight specified on the packaging.

Variations in coatings and textiles might result in minor weight discrepancies throughout the production process, depending on the application.

In the case of lightweight tents, this corresponds to only an ounce or two of weight. In larger tents, the price might be a little more. Here are a few possible explanations for the weight discrepancies:

  • Variations in coating thickness: The thickness of coatings on tent fabric might differ somewhat from one tent to the next. Fabrics are created in batches, which are referred to as “lots,” and there can be a tiny weight difference between lots as well as between different lots of the same fabric. Varying sizes and weights of fabrics: Because tent fabric is manually cut in up to 200 layers at a time, some sections may be cut just outside the line, resulting in some areas being slightly bigger and heavier than others. Accuracy of the scale: Weights are calculated at MSR using our calibrated lab scales, which are more precise than standard household scales
  • And Addition of products:Brands may opt at the last minute to incorporate more stakes or guy ropes, which may increase the overall weight of their bundled goods.

Please see our blog post on the issue of tent weights for additional information on how we determine tent weights. What happens if one of my poles snaps or becomes damaged? If a tent pole breaks, you may use the pole repair sleeve to create a temporary splint to keep it from falling over. Slide the repair sleeve over the fractured section and keep it in place with tape or a stick to prevent it from moving. What can I do to keep mildew at bay? One of the most common ways to cause damage to your tent is to fail to dry it as fast as possible after it has been wet.

  • Mildew can cause the waterproof coatings to split from the fabric, leading them to be permanently damaged.
  • Mildew stains are difficult to remove.
  • If your tent seems dry after usage, it is always wise to double-check that it is entirely dry before putting it away for the winter.
  • Never dry your tent in the washing machine since the heat might cause the fabric to melt.

MSR Remote 2 Review

He is a high performing all-arounder who performs most things well without being exceptional at anything in particular. Photo courtesy of MSR”> Image courtesy of MSRP rice:$700 Backcountry’s price list is available online. Compare pricing at two different resellers. Pros: Huge hooped vestibule, one of the lighter double wall alternatives, bomber design, simple to set up, sturdy construction, performs well in the rain, and more. Cons: The vestibule is difficult to learn and has shown to be less beneficial than other tiny secondary vestibules.

The top items are researched, tested, and rated by our editors, who do so in an independent manner.

We never accept free things from manufacturers.

  • Weather/storm resistance (25 percent 8.0)
  • Livability (18 percent 8.0)
  • Ease of setup (ten percent 9.0)
  • Durability (ten percent 8.0)
  • And versatility (ten percent 8.0) were all given high marks. Weight was given a rating of 5.0 out of 5 stars.

Our Verdict

A four-season tent that is durable enough for expedition usage but light enough to contemplate bringing on summer climbing activities or even the occasional backpacking trip, the MSR Remote 2 is a great all-around option. The big vestibule was a favorite of the reviewers, and it turned out to be one of the most straightforward models to assemble. It features a storm-worthy construction that would be appropriate for use in Alaska, and its relatively light weight makes it suitable for use during summer climbing expeditions.

While it’s a good tent, there are lighter, less stormproof variants that you might use for more mild journeys, as well as heavier, roomier, and slightly burlier models that would be better suited for long-distance expeditions.

Our Analysis and Test Results

Designed for lengthy trips as well as weekend summer mountain experiences closer to home, the MSR Remote 2 is a versatile four-season tent that can handle it all. While it is possible to get a model that is better at any one item than this one, it is difficult to find a model that is as good at everything as this one.

Performance Comparison

This tent is a versatile solution that may be used in a range of weather and season circumstances. We adore the large vestibule, which provided us with plenty of storage space as well as a place to cook in inclement weather. Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson It is a flexible alternative that may be used in a range of seasons and weather circumstances. We adore the large vestibule, which provided us with plenty of storage space as well as a place to cook in inclement weather. Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson

Ease of Set-up

Even in inclement weather, this is one of the most straightforward four-season tents to erect. All three poles that make up the tent’s body are connected by a central hub, with the exception of the vestibule pole, which is not connected. Because of this construction, the poles can be snapped together fast and then clipped into place with the help of sturdy plastic taps. The third body pole is very straightforward to install. We like how simple it was to pitch the Remote, which relied on plastic clips to hold the poles in place.

Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson “>We like how simple it was to pitch the Remote, which relied on plastic clips to secure the poles in place.

Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson

Weather and Storm Resistance

TheRemote 2 provides rugged four-season protection for climbing and winter camping adventures alike. This tent is substantially stronger than it would be if the poles were not linked to the central hub at the top of the tent because two of the poles are constantly attached to the central hub at the top of the tent. Remote’s strength is derived from the material used in its poles, as well as from its distinctive construction. Both of the principal poles that run across the tent are permanently attached to the hub that was put into the tent.

  • Their Easton Syclone composite poles, which are among the strongest in the review, are particularly impressive.
  • The two major poles that create a “X” across the tent are permanently attached to the hub that is integrated into the tent.
  • Their Easton Syclone composite poles, which are among the strongest in the review, are particularly impressive.
  • For truly nasty conditions, all of the guyline locations have a corresponding Velcro flap on the inside of the fly that allows the fly to be attached directly to the poles, allowing the guylines to provide stronger support for the poles.
  • Rainier, for example.
  • Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson “>The guyline attachment points have been strengthened to increase their longevity.

When we utilized this tent in numerous severe storms, we were amazed with how well the design stood up to the wind and snow loads that it received. Because it’s at the higher end of the storm-capable spectrum, we’d be willing to use it almost everywhere on the planet.

Weight and Packed Size

The Remote 2’s minimum weight is 6 pounds 8 ounces (with the fly, body, and poles), and its packed weight is 6 pounds 15 ounces (including items like guylines, stakes, and the pole bag), which is less than what most people would bring. The packed weight isn’t too awful for a tent of this size with such a large vestibule, especially considering the size of the tent. In addition to a large vestibule area of 22 square feet, the Remote 2 features an interior size of 33 square feet. This tent is long enough to accommodate people who are 6 feet tall, although it is broader rather than longer when compared to other types.

This tent is long enough to accommodate people who are 6 feet tall, although it is broader rather than longer when compared to other types.

Livability and Comfort

The Remote 2 has an interior size of 33 square feet and a huge vestibule area of 22 square feet, making it ideal for small groups. It’s a reasonable width, and it has enough inside space to hold equipment. The Remote has an above-average peak height and is the lightest double wall type we evaluated with two doors, despite the fact that it has two doors. TNF Mountain 25 and MH Trango 2 are two examples of models that have more headroom than this one, however this one does not. Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson It has a higher peak height than the average double wall model we evaluated, and it is also the lightest of the double wall models we studied with two doors.

See also:  How To Put Up A Child'S Tent

Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson While it is not absolutely necessary, having two doors is a great feature, and the Remote 2 was the lightest double-wall tent on the market to have them.

Adaptability and Versatility

As a four-season tent, this one is fairly adaptable, and because of its double-wall construction, it may even be used for occasional three-season use. The breathability of the inner fabric was satisfactory. There are two mesh windows, one on each entrance, to aid in the circulation of air and the prevention of condensation. Overall, this model coped with condensation quite well (definitely better than any single wall tent), but it was only average when compared to other double walled shelters in this category.

  • Overall, this model coped with condensation quite well (definitely better than any single wall tent), but it was only average when compared to other double walled shelters in this category.
  • This panel has a flap that is approximately half the size of each of the doors on each side.
  • Another instance in which we found the large vestibule to be beneficial was when, during stormy weather, we would leave the vestibule-side door completely open in order to better control moisture and condensation build-up.
  • The Remote 2 is one of the more adaptable four-season versions available.
  • If you’re planning on doing ski touring or carrying over alpine climbs, it’s probably a touch too hefty and thick.

This is a crucial feature if you are camping on snow since it allows you to block off the area where you are tented. It also contributes to the overall robustness of the tent by securing it to the ground in numerous locations throughout. Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson

“Snow flaps are included in both the front and rear vestibules of the Remote 2. This is a crucial feature if you are camping on snow since it allows you to block off the area where you are tented. It also contributes to the overall robustness of the tent by securing it to the ground in numerous locations throughout. Photograph courtesy of Ian Nicholson

Value

The Remote 2 is one of the more costly double-wall tents in our study, but it does come with a vestibule, which is nice. Even though it is made to last and has numerous noteworthy features, it is significantly more expensive than some of its closest competitors. Because it has a vestibule, you’ll want to keep that in mind when comparing costs for similar units in the area.

Conclusion

The MSR Remote 2 is a flexible four-season tent that is less focused on expeditions and more of an all-around alternative than the MSR Remote 1. However, it is not nearly as roomy as a proper adventure tent, despite the fact that it is stormproof and may be used in isolated and severe areas. What it sacrifices in terms of space, it makes up for in terms of weight and packed volume, which are both reduced significantly. This makes it more feasible to go on shorter-duration climbing expeditions in the lower 48 states or other similar locations across the world.

Switchback Travel

Price:$800 Category:Basecamp/mountaineering Six pounds eight ounces on the trail Floor space: 33 square feet Wall(s):Double What we like: The use of vertical walls to expand usable space, as well as the spacious size of the entrance entryway. What we don’t like: There are no snow flaps, there is limited ventilation, and it is somewhat pricey. See the MSR Remote 24.2 for further information. Roominess and comfort, ventilation, and exceptionally robust stormproof construction are all important characteristics of a 4-season tent.

In preparation for a short weekend on Mount Rainier and a longer basecamp-style excursion to the Columbia Icefield, I was hoping to locate a 4-season tent that could be used for anything from lightweight climbing to a multi-day home away from home on a glacier.

It was a lofty order, to be sure, but MSR’s Remote 2 more than met the challenge.

Check out our post on the best 4-season tents to see how it compares to the competition.

Performance

Spring in the Canadian Rockies can be finicky, and camping on the Columbia Icefield provided an excellent chance to put the MSR Remote 2 through its paces in a range of weather situations. I was a little apprehensive about carrying a new tent on such a long excursion, but I quickly acquired trust in the Remote’s construction and performance. We endured clear and chilly circumstances with moderate winds, a small dusting of snow, scorching sunshine, and warm rain, among other things. The return to our familiar shelter at the end of each day was reassuring, with the bright orange tent visible from a mile away and the bright orange tent standing strong.

  1. At Camp Sherman on Mount Rainier, we pitched the Remote 2 next to Mountain Hardwear’s bombproof Trango 2 and lightweight Direkt 2, and weathered the elements in a comparable manner to the other brands.
  2. The Remote 2’s three-pole structure provides the time-tested stability of a dome tent, with even more strength (and height) owing to the inclusion of the door-to-door pole.
  3. As an added bonus, the Easton Syclone poles that come with MSR’s all-season tents, which the company describes as “virtually indestructible,” are engineered to bend rather than shatter or deform when subjected to heavy weights.
  4. In addition to the robust pole framework, there are a total of 14 different guy-out locations, allowing you to secure the tent in whatever direction you want.
  5. When utilizing a limited number of poles and skis to secure a tent in the snow, this is very beneficial.
  6. The Remote is constructed to withstand snow from both above and below.
  7. Adding insult to injury, when the rainfly is pitched tight, the bottom edge of the rainfly can float up to five inches above the surface of the ground.
  8. In this case, I wish MSR had stretched the fly farther down, or incorporated snow flaps around the entire perimeter for a more bombproof construction all around.
  9. In contrast, the double-wallMSR Remote 2 is completely impervious to rain; we encountered precipitation even on a glacier in the Canadian Rockies and were completely sheltered.
  10. (40D and 1,500mm).
  11. The DuraShield polyurethane coating and high-quality seam tape ensure that the tent’s bottom is just as durable as the rest of the tent.

All things considered, the Remote provides excellent rain protection, making it a suitable alternative for expeditions that need lengthy approaches and subalpine weather conditions in general.

Ventilation and Condensation

When camping in the winter, condensation may be a significant problem; tents must strike a delicate balance between retaining warmth while not retaining too much air. Because of the thick rainfly material, the Remote is unquestionably a warm tent, which has both advantages and disadvantages. During the early morning hours, the bright spring sun soon warmed the tent, raising the temperature inside to a sauna-like 85°F and causing moisture to gather around the walls. We woke up to frost lining the inside ceiling of the room during our coldest night, when temperatures dropped to 5°F.

On subsequent nights, we opened both the mesh panels and the top-zipped doors and experienced no condensation—which was likely facilitated by the windy circumstances.

Interior Space and Storage

The Remote 2 is intended for use on trips when teams may be forced to spend many days inside due to inclement weather. Consequently, it has a vast floor layout with 33 square feet of internal floor area and a peak height of 44 inches, which is extended across a significant amount of the interior due to the three-pole design. This is more than enough space for two full-length sleeping mats, two full-sized guys, and all of our cumbersome winter gear, which is evenly distributed throughout the inside.

Because of the relatively high ceiling, you may easily sit straight in the tent without having to worry about touching the walls of the tent.

When the weather is bad in the winter, I prefer having a spacious vestibule to keep all of my stuff safe without having to bring everything inside the tent.

The primary vestibule is also large enough that I felt comfortable using a stove on cold mornings when I didn’t want to be too far from my sleeping bag, which was convenient.

Weight

The MSR Remote 2 has a minimum weight of 6 pounds 8 ounces, which puts it about in the center of the pack for double-wall, four-season tents. Include the eight MSR Blizzard snow stakes I used for these treks, and my overall weight for the trip was a very competitive 6 pounds 14 ounces when everything was packed. It is possible to save several pounds by using a single-wall, four-season tent such as the Black Diamond Eldorado, but you will sacrifice comfort in cooler temperatures and rain, interior and vestibule room, and you will most likely be restricted to only one door.

When comparing the Remote 2 to other double-wall tents, such as The North Face Mountain 25 (8 pounds 13 ounces), it becomes clear that it manages to pack a significant amount of comfort and protection into a very small size.

Set Up and Take Down

My first few efforts at setting up the Remote 2 were unsuccessful, which was especially frustrating given the windy weather we were experiencing. Installing the body of the tent is simple enough; simply secure the four corners and attach the color matched pole clips to the three main poles to complete the process (a fourth pole is used to create the large vestibule). In the wind, it becomes necessary to use two people to work on the fly and vestibules since they do not remain in place without the use of guylines to keep them in place.

  1. One flaw in the design was the use of Velcro straps to link the guyline connection points to the poles, which was a disappointment.
  2. Because of the way the rainfly was constructed, it was difficult to keep the seams of the fly aligned with the poles; the fly had a propensity to sit out of alignment.
  3. On the plus side, even with gloves on, I found the 17 plastic clips that join the tent poles to the tent, as well as the camming plates on the guylines, to be rather simple to grasp and manipulate.
  4. If you plan to use this tent in the snow, you should consider acquiring the MSR Blizzard stakes and an extra guyline to use with skis and poles to hold the tent to the ground.

Build Quality and Durability

Five days on the Columbia Icefield, two days on Mount Rainier, and another five days on a summer camping trip have all been spent in the MSR Remote 2, and the tent shows no symptoms of wear or tear at this point. I’ll be keeping an eye on the rainfly to see how well the DWR coating, as well as the polyurethane coating, hold up against the elements. In comparison to the more costly sil-nylon coating used on Hilleberg tents, the polyurethane coating is less resistant to moisture exposure when exposed for an extended period of time.

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Additional Capacities

To conduct this assessment, we used the MSR Remote 2, a two-person tent that weighs 6 pounds 8 ounces and has an internal capacity of 33 square feet. MSR also offers a three-person version of the Remote, which has a four-pole construction and adds 13 square feet of internal room to the overall footprint. They are both constructed of the same materials and offer similar weather protection and durability. The exteriors of both buildings have a same general form, consisting of two entrances and two vestibules (each providing a total of 22 square feet of space) as well as the same 44-inch peak height.

The Remote 3 weighs 7 pounds 14 ounces and has a suggested retail price of $900. The 3-person version makes a lot of sense for two winter campers who have a lot of things to store inside the tent throughout their stay.

What We Like

  • Most mountaineering treks benefit from excellent all-around weather protection. There are two entrances for simple access, as well as a large principal vestibule. The presence of almost vertical walls allows for a large amount of habitable interior space.

What We Don’t

  • There are no snow flaps on the sides of the tent, and the bottom edge of the rainfly can float up to five inches above the ground when the tent is erected taut. There are several alternatives for ventilation
  • In the wind, setup can be difficult, and perfect seam alignment necessitates the use of rainfly tension. Not all of the guylines are included with the tent
  • Others are optional. It’s rather pricey

Comparison Table

Tent Price Category Weight Area Height Wall(s)
MSR Remote 2 $800 Basecamp/mountaineering 6 lbs. 8 oz. 33 sq. ft. 43 in. Double
Hilleberg Jannu $990 Mountaineering 6 lbs. 2 oz. 34.4 sq. ft. 39 in. Double
The North Face Mountain 25 $689 Basecamp 8 lbs. 13 oz. 32.3 sq. ft. 41 in. Double
MSR Access 2 $600 Treeline 3 lbs. 10 oz. 29 sq. ft. 42 in. Double
Nemo Choguri 2 $700 Basecamp 6 lbs. 13 oz. 36.3 sq. ft. 39 in. Double

The Competition

Making a choice between usefulness, weight, and price when purchasing a four-season tent is essential to finding the best deal. The MSR Remote 2 manages to strike a better balance between its priorities than the majority of tents, but it is not without its share of competitors. First and foremost, Hilleberg’s Jannusets established the bar for the most durable and lightweight two-person double-wall tent available today. Because of its reduced weight, it weighs 6 pounds 2 ounces at its most, which is 6 ounces lighter than the Remote 2.

  • Hilleberg tents are considered to be the best in the business, and the price reflects that: $990 for the Jannu against $800 for the Remote 2.
  • The bombproof is designed for greater robustness while also adding weight.
  • Both tents have a comparable floor area, with the TNF having 32.3 square feet of floor space and the MSR having 33 square feet of floor space.
  • Nonetheless, the greater weight of the Mountain 25 has its advantages: the tent has a beefier overlapping pole system, a stronger floor, and more ventilation choices, which contributes to a more sturdier and more pleasant design overall.
  • If you’re not intending on camping in extreme alpine conditions, the MSR Accessis a more lightweight 4-season tent that will suffice.
  • It weighs in at a bare minimum of 3 pounds 10 ounces, but it has 4 square feet less inside room and a 20D fly that is substantially thinner than the Access 1.
  • If you’ll be up in the mountains, want excellent snow load performance, or just want a bombproof tent that you can rely on, the Remote is the tent for you.
  • Despite being heavier than the Remote, it only adds 3.3 square feet of floor area to the overall footprint, which is equivalent to that of the Remote (although you lose 4 inches overhead with a shorter 39-inch peak height).
  • The Nemo, on the other hand, makes a few concessions, including 6 square feet less vestibule room and a fly that is substantially less durable (30D compared to the MSR’s 68D).

The Mountain 25 seen above outperforms both tents in genuinely inclement weather, but for missions where weight is a consideration, we’d choose the MSR Remote over the Chogori instead.

MSR Remote 3 Person Dome Tent Review

Can I use the Remote 3 as a stand-alone unit? Yes, although it is preferable to utilize the guy wires and stakes that come with it to keep it in place. Is there a floor saver that comes with the tent? No, a footprint is not included in the purchase price; however, you may get one manufactured by MSR separately. Is the Remote 3 an excellent choice for backpacking? Because it weighs 141 Oz, it is likely to be too hefty for a solitary camper to carry about with them. Cycling or camping with a motorbike would be a great use for this product.

  1. Yes, because it is a 4-season tent, it can be used for camping throughout the year.
  2. Given that it has less room than other 3-person tents, it may be a little cramped.
  3. Yes, there are hooks and pegs for you to hang your belongings on the inside.
  4. Yes, it is conceivable; nevertheless, it is usually simpler when there are more than one person present.
  5. Yes, there are two vestibules in the tent for storing your dirty boots, outdoor gear, and other belongings.

Amazon.com : MSR Expedition-Tents msr Remote 4 Season Person Mountaineering Tent with Dome Vestibule : Sports & Outdoors

The MSR Remote 4-Season 2-Person Mountaineering Tent with Dome Vestibule is a more habitable and weather-resistant mountaineering tent than other mountaineering tents, making it ideal for alpinists who are exposed to harsh conditions. Despite being exposed to exceptionally strong winds and snow loads, the core support frame made of Easton Syclone poles remains stable. In high winds, reinforced, reflective guy-out points assist to avoid fabric rips and maintain the double-wall tent taut and well-tensioned.

  • The vestibule is supported by a structural, hooped tent pole, which provides it with about the same amount of headroom as the tent body itself.
  • The primary interior floorspace is 87 inches long by 55 inches wide (33 square feet) when it is fully assembled, with an interior peak height of 44 inches at its maximum.
  • Included with the purchase of the MSR Remote 2 Two-Person Tent are the following items: the tent body and rainfly; poles; stakes; guylines; a tent bag; pole bags; stake bags; and a stake bag.
  • Limited 3-year warranty from the manufacturer.

MSR Remote 3 Mountaineering Tent – Your Winter Adventure Palace

MSR created the new Remote line of tents to be livable as well as durable, and they accomplish this goal. With a number of new features, this tent is a contender for your next winter backcountry expedition.

The new Easton Syclone poles have a high level of durability. Aside from the welded guy out points and the additional living area, the MSR Remote 3 is a wonderful tent for severe winter expeditions in the mountains.

Easton Syclone Poles for added durability

The Remote tents were designed by MSR to resist heavy snow and wind conditions. It is said that the Easton Syclone poles are virtually unbreakable. The Syclone poles are comprised of composite materials that are coiled in a variety of ways to create the desired effect. This permits the poles to bend rather than fracture or shatter, as would be the case with aluminum or carbon poles. They say that when compared to carbon or aluminum, they are 80 percent less likely to fail. They are not any heavier than the other types of poles, despite the fact that they are more durable.

MSR Remote tent and splitboard with a remote location.

Architecture made for adventure

A substantial amount of snow and wind were considered when designing the Remote tents. It is said that the Easton Syclone poles are virtually indestructable. A composite material is used to construct the Syclone poles, which are wrapped in a number of different ways. Unlike aluminum or carbon poles, this allows the poles to bend rather than shatter or break. According to them, when compared to carbon or aluminum, they are 80 percent less prone to fail. They are not any heavier than the other types of poles, despite the fact that they are more durable.

A remote tent and splitboard from MSR are included.

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How did it do in the elements?

During my testing, I did not come into any Everest-like situations, but I was able to utilize the Remote 3 tent in the Colorado Mountains during a nice snow storm with moderate winds. When I was lying down on my winter sleeping pad, I didn’t come into contact with the tent’s ends, which was a huge plus for me. Due to my height of 6’1″ and the use of a 4″ thick winter sleeping mat, I often find myself touching the edges of certain tents. Because of the steeper walls of the tent, it was simple to become comfortable sitting up in it.

  • It was simple to put the tent together.
  • The pre-bent poles should be inserted under the main poles and secured using the clips provided.
  • I slammed my fists against the poles, forcing them to bend.
  • I’m interested to know whether any other tent producers utilize these Easton Syclone poles in addition to ours.
  • Even with only the four corners staked out and the poles in place, the tent appears to be quite durable.
  • They have a spiral groove to them, and they are lengthier than some other stakes on the market today.
  • I was able to set up the tent with the pegs that were given, but I had to be selective about the parts I didn’t stake down.
  • Heck, 20 more people and you could completely man out the tent.

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The tent gains even greater strength as a result of this.

This tent is built to withstand some severe weather conditions!

As a result, I had to unzip the back vestibule to create a 6′′ gap to enable air to flow through the tent.

Initially, I did not believe it would be very successful, but it turned out to be just great. Condensation is really low. Even with two dogs and a well enclosed tent, it was still cold. Impressive.

Conclusion

The Remote 3 tent has been my home for numerous nights, and I can confidently state that it is a legitimate four season tent. The tent is easy to put up. The foyer in front of the building is spacious and convenient. In fact, you can put three long, broad sleeping mats inside the tent. Both the materials and the craftsmanship are of high caliber. This would be ideal if MSR would incorporate a couple more Cyclone stakes in the game. The suggested retail price is $899. Likewise, see –

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