How To Winterize A Tent Trailer

How to Winterize a Pop-Up Camper

Now that snow flakes are predicted, it is time to start thinking about winterizing your recreational vehicle. Winterizing a pop-up camper is a little bit easier than winterizing a travel trailer or a motor home, but it is just as vital as winterizing any of those vehicles. When it comes to winterizing your pop-up camper, follow this checklist to guarantee that it is ready to travel when the warm weather arrives again.

Winterize Pop-Up Camper Checklist

  • All of the water from the pop-up camper water tanks, including the fresh water tank and hot water heater, should be drained out — For pop-up campers, like with travel trailers and motor homes, the most critical part of winterizing a pop-up camper is to completely empty the water out of the tanks. Winter is a freezing and expanding season, and any water left in the pipes will freeze and expand, and if the pipes are not broad enough to allow the expansion, the pipes will break. Set up an air hose to connect to the city water intake — By pumping air through the faucet, you can ensure that all of the water in your water tank is gone. If you have a pop-up camper, this is a very critical step in winterizing it since even a tiny quantity of water may do significant harm if it freezes in the tank
  • Fill a jug of antifreeze halfway using a hand pump hose. Removing the suction side of your hand pump from the pop-up camper’s water tank and placing the hose in an antifreeze bottle will help prevent ice buildup. Pump the hand pump until a tiny amount of antifreeze is poured into the drain– Using a pump to pump the water until some antifreeze emerges in the sink, you can be certain that antifreeze is present all the way through your pipes. Connect a hand pump to the city water inlet– Once you have done so, open the faucet and begin pumping antifreeze through the pipes with the hand pump (please note that this requires a separate hand pump). Reconnect everything — At this stage, remember to wipe the sink out completely. Antifreeze has the potential to discolor. If you are using a Porta Potty, ensure sure the holding tank is completely empty before using it. Drain both the fresh water and the black water from your Porta Potty– After you have done this, pour antifreeze into the fresh water holding tank of the Porta Potty. To flush the antifreeze via the Porta Potty, use the hand pump to pump it.

Other Pop-Up Camper Maintenance Tips

  • Many individuals prefer to conduct additional maintenance work on their pop-up RV after it has been winterized. We recommend that you: thoroughly clean your pop-up camper from top to bottom, including the canvas and roof of the canvas
  • Replace any damaged or missing parts of the pop-up camper
  • And replace any missing or damaged parts of the pop-up camper. All of the appliances in your pop-up camper should be cleaned. If at all feasible, keep the refrigerator door open but obstructed. This will allow for better air movement and will help to avoid mold formation. All food products, as well as any objects that may rust or explode (spray cans, for example), should be removed from the pop-up camper. Ensure that the lift system and any moving elements, including as locks, bed slides, and hitches, are properly lubricated. Replace the wheel bearings in their original packaging. Make that the brakes are working properly.

Outdoor Pop-Up Camper Storage Tips

  • Close up any gaps on the underside of the pop-up camper, particularly water line openings, through which animals might get access
  • Remove the battery from your pop-up camper and store it safely inside your home. Keep in mind to keep it charged throughout the winter. Cover any vent holes, such as those on the refrigerator, furnace, hot water heater, and other appliances. Using plastic shrink wrap, this can be accomplished. Reduce the height of the tongue end of your pop-up camper to the lowest level feasible to allow rain and snow to slide off rapidly
  • Keep in mind that if you are parking your pop-up camper on the ground (soil), you must support the wheels up with blocks. Otherwise, when the earth thaws after the winter, they may become entrapped in the mud.

Make sure to thoroughly winterize your pop-up camper even if you are not intending on going camping this winter so that you can be confident that it will survive for many years to come. To acquire winterization materials or to have your pop-up camper inspected before the winter season, stop by Beckley’s Camping Center.

How to Winterize Your Tent Trailer

Image courtesy of Andy Reynolds/Lifesize/Getty Images Yes, there is more to storing your tent trailer than just dropping the top and leaving it parked for the season at the campsite. Damage to your tent trailer from dry rot, mildew, rust, burst pipes, and other causes might occur if it is not properly prepared for the winter. Take a few simple actions at the conclusion of your camping season to ensure that everything is in working order for the upcoming winter months, and your trailer will be in excellent condition when spring and the following camping season arrive on the scene.

Step 1

Thoroughly clean the inside of the trailer. Remove any food items that may attract rats from the vicinity. Clean out the refrigerator and vacuum up any crumbs that have accumulated in cabinets or storage locations. Sweep the floors and clean any carpets or cushions that have accumulated. Make careful to elevate all mattresses and cushions and clean beneath them to ensure that there is no dirt left behind.

Step 2

All items such as aerosol cans, toiletries that may freeze, pillows, coolers, and fishing gear that you may wish to keep somewhere else for the winter should be removed from the vehicle.

Step 3

The exterior of the tent trailer should be cleaned with a moderate detergent, a gentle scrub brush, and plenty of water.

Step 4

Make any little repairs inside or outside your home that you believe are in need of attention.

Step 5

Open all drains and faucets, as well as the water pipes and water tanks, to drain the water. If your home has a hot water tank, you should bypass it according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Close all faucets and drains, then apply RV antifreeze to the various water lines and tanks in your vehicle. This is not the same as automobile antifreeze, which is extremely dangerous; instead, this is a particular antifreeze that you may get from an RV provider or dealer.

Step 6

Removing the battery and storing it somewhere else is recommended.

Step 7

In order to keep undesirable guests out of your home during the winter, cover any vents and openings other than the entrance with thick plastic or a tarp.

Step 8

Repack the bearings if necessary, and lubricate the moving parts. Check and oil the wheels as needed. Check all of the electrical connections and make sure that all of the lights are operational.

Replace any burned-out bulbs as needed. Place the trailer such that the wheels do not come into contact with any soil. If you want to protect the tires from lying on the ground during the winter, you can elevate and block the trailer after it has been closed.

Step 9

Before shutting the tent trailer, place a chemical air dryer on a flat surface, such as the floor, and connect it to the trailer’s electrical system. This will keep humidity and moisture out, as well as reducing the likelihood of mildew forming. Depending on the manufacturer’s recommendations, you can either cover or leave the tent trailer uncovered. Some tent trailers should be covered with a tarp, while others are not intended to be covered at any time. Consult your trailer’s owner’s handbook to learn which steps are required for your particular model.

  • Toolkit includes: shop vacuum, broom, clean rags, water, bucket, RV antifreeze, garden hose, soft scrub brush, mild detergent or vehicle wash solution
  • Chemical air drier
  • Tarp or heavy plastic
  • Lubricant

Background information about the author: Caprice Castano recently retired from the area of construction management to start her own contracting firm and devote more time to establishing her literary career. Among my current undertakings are freelance writing for online media and the completion of a novel-length work of fiction.

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Even a single step in a winterization routine might result in damage to the camper and the need for costly repairs in the spring. No, I’m not stating this to terrify you; yet, it is real. In order to prevent this from happening, it is critical to have a detailed winterization checklist that you can refer to on an annual basis. I’ve made every effort to meet your expectations. Let’s get this party started.

How to Winterize a Pop Up Camper

Let’s start with a fundamental winterization step that is sometimes forgotten. If you are parking your camper on a surface other than hard concrete, you should install wheel blocks to protect the wheels. Yes, it is true that the soil you are considering parking on has become rock solid in recent days. This is due to the fact that it is really chilly outside. However, guess what? It won’t be this chilly for much longer. At some point, though, the earth will begin to thaw, and that hard soil will turn into mud if it rain or snows.

Get your wheel blocks right away!

2. Prep Your Tongue

Okay, so it’s not yourtongue per se, but the tonguehitch on your pop up camper. The hitch will most likely remain linked to your camper during the off-season even if it is not connected to a towing vehicle or other vehicle. Before you put your camper away for the winter, you’ll want to make sure that the tongue end is properly positioned on the frame. It should be as low as you are able to get away with. When it snows or showers, the liquid will flow off the hitch at an angle, rather than accumulating and remaining on the surface of the road.

3. Close All Your Vents

It’s critical that all of the vents in your camper are completely closed before you leave. And who knows what type of harm you’ll do if you let chilly air enter your pop up shop. Do you truly want to know the answer? Most likely not. If you don’t have the ability to manually open and close your vents, plastic wrap is about to become your best friend.

A well packed square of the substance over the vents should provide enough of a seal to effectively block the vents. Make sure you clean every vent, including the ones that are often overlooked, such as the ones for the hot water heater, furnace, and refrigerator.

4. Bring Your Battery

Your camper’s battery is the lifeline of the vehicle. You won’t be able to use any of the amenities if your battery is dead. It’s critical to take good care of your batteries, charging them when they’re low, and keeping an eye on the wattage of the products and appliances that you use every day. Battery maintenance does not cease when your camping excursions come to an end for the season. If you leave your batteries in your vehicle during the cold season, you will almost certainly find that they are dead when you return.

  1. Yes, those will be reduced to zero, but it is possible to entirely destroy the batteries.
  2. It is possible that they will die as a result of this.
  3. Place them in a dark, out-of-the-way location such as your home or garage, away from direct sunlight.
  4. Oh, and be sure you charge the batteries when they reach 80 percent capacity.

5. Look for and Patch up Gaps and Holes

The idea is that if you leave your pop-up camper alone for the winter, nothing or no one will be able to get inside. However, if you have any holes in your vehicle, no matter how minor, you may be astonished to discover that creatures have been living in your camper over the winter months. If you want to keep out mice, rats, insects, and even bats, you’ll have to seal up every crack and crevice in your home. You’ll also have to seal up every hole in your roof. Starting with the inside, exterior, underbelly, and roof of your pop-up camper, you should proceed to the rest of the vehicle.

Following the examination, caulk or another sealing substance should be used to close all of the gaps.

6. Lubricate and Lubricate Some More

Because you will not be utilizing sections of your camper such as the hitches, bed slides, locks, and other moving components for a few months does not mean you should leave them to rot in their original state. Apply lubrication to their surfaces. Utilize the same quantity as you would usually, since excessive lubrication might result in a sticky smear. If you are able to return to your car anytime during the off-season and lube it again, that would be fantastic. However, depending on your storage option, this may not always be viable in all situations.

Don’t be too concerned if you won’t be able to view your camper until the following spring. Its components will last through the winter as long as you remember to lubricate them before you leave for the season.

7. Unplug Everything

In a pop up camper, leaving stuff running will not have an impact on the battery because you are transporting it, but it is still not a good idea in most situations. If you’re keeping anything onboard for the winter, including your refrigerator, small counter appliances, and alarm clocks, make sure they’re not connected in. It’s possible that you’ll unintentionally destroy your beloved electrical device this way. If it is a significant appliance, the cost of replacing it might be prohibitively high.

8. No Food Left Behind

Remember how I indicated in an earlier part that creatures and insects would be delighted to spend the winter in your pop-up camper? One method of attracting them that is nearly certain to work is to leave food in the car. I’m talking about any type of food, whether it’s sealed or not. Whatever is edible and has a fragrance, even if it is a faint one, will pique the interest of some chilly, hungry beast. Even if you believe that leaving bottled, sealed beverages or unopened cans is safe, you’d be amazed at how dangerous it can be.

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It isn’t just about eating, either.

You do not want to return in the spring to find an infestation on your property.

It’s also not a bad idea to do this.

9. Clean up Your Camper

Before you can winterize your camper, you must thoroughly clean it from top to bottom, inside and out. Not only does this eliminate the aforementioned rodent and bug problem, but it also saves you time in the spring while you are preparing your garden. Your camper will not be immaculate after winterization, but it will be far less dirty than it would be if you had not cleaned it before putting it away. One suggestion, if you have the ability to do so, is to leave the refrigerator door open. Given that your refrigerator will be disconnected in any case, there is no risk in doing so.

When you keep the fridge door closed, the warm, slippery climate creates the ideal habitat for mold and mildew to thrive and spread throughout the refrigerator.

10. Empty Your Toilet and Tanks

All of your tanks, including your freshwater and blackwater tanks, must be completely depleted of water. If you have a marine toilet, don’t forget to bring that along as well. You may always dispose of a cassette toilet outside at a waste disposal facility at your convenience if you like. You may even deep clean your marine toilet if you want to.

This may be accomplished by opening the freshwater holding tank and pouring antifreeze into it. Make use of your hand pump to force all of the antifreeze via the drain. Clean water should be flushed through the system to eliminate antifreeze residue before draining it.

11. Empty Your Hot Water Heater, Too

Don’t forget about your hot water heater when you’re getting ready for winter. The tanks should be entirely depleted before use. Before you handle your hot water heater, check sure it has been properly de-energized and allowed to cool down completely. If you don’t, you run the danger of burning or badly harming yourself. Drain your hot water heater fully as soon as you are able to do so in a safe manner. If even a small amount of water stays in the pipes, you are in for a nasty time. The water will get ice cold and eventually solidify.

That might cause your pipes to burst.

That’s a surprise no one wants to be reminded of in the future.

12. Winterize Your Shower and Sinks

If you’re fortunate enough to have an inside shower in your pop-up camper, you’ll have to put in some effort to make it ready for the season ahead of you. You’ll need to use antifreeze once again, but this time make sure it’s pink or has some other bright hue. This way, you’ll be able to view it when it’s released. Begin by turning on your cold-water faucet by cranking it. After that, repeat the process with the hot-water knob. Fill the freshwater tank with antifreeze and leave the faucets running for a few minutes.

Put in this effort for both your shower and your sink, and your situation will improve.

13. Check Your Awnings and Tent Sides

I mentioned before how important it is to thoroughly clean your pop-up camper before using it. Pay particular attention to the sides of your awnings and/or tents while you do this. These can become worn down as a result of exposure to severe weather or prolonged use. If you discover any stray threads, clip them as soon as possible. If there are any surplus strings at the seams, these should be cut down as well. In addition, look for additional indicators of wear and tear such as tears, rips, or punctures.

However, don’t wait until the spring to deal with the problem.

Now is a good time to patch it up and check on it in the spring.

14.Test Your Lift System

I’ve written about your pop-up camper lift system, so if you haven’t already, I urge that you read it. Your lift system may be operated by a manual crank or it may be driven by electricity. Regardless, you should thoroughly inspect and test all of the parts and components before storing them for the winter. If the limit switch is not functioning properly or the lift system is not functioning properly, do not wait until the spring to get everything repaired.

Ensure that any moving components that are slow or appear dried out are lubricated. If you’ve checked the lift system and found it to be in good working order, you may leave it for a few months with no worries.

Pop Up Camper Storage Options

Before you can begin making all of your winterization preparations, you must first decide where you will park your pop-up camper during the off-season. In the event that you own a modest pop-up camper, you could be in luck. Its small footprint makes it suitable for parking in your driveway or, in some cases, even in your garage. If you don’t have a garage, you may always park the car on your street. Before taking this option, you may want to consult with your homeowner’s association (if applicable) or your neighborhood to ensure that you are not in violation of any zoning rules.

  • After all, you don’t want to offend anyone, do you?
  • Instead, you will be required to store your vehicle in a storage facility.
  • If you choose indoor storage over outdoor storage, you will have to spend more money.
  • If you park your camper at the facility, you will be charged a monthly fee for the whole time it is there.
  • If you have to leave your camper outside in the elements for the next several months, you should park it in a shaded area to protect it from the elements.
  • As previously discussed in the essay, wheel blocks will come in helpful in this situation.
  • One such cover is available from Classic Accessories on Amazon, and it looks like this: While a cover of this nature is not inexpensive, it may provide excellent protection for your camper from the weather.
  • It is composed of fiber structure, which prevents the water from seeping through.
  • Instead, they feature a unique finish that allows water to easily glide straight off of the surface.
  • The result is that your pop up camper is vulnerable to water damage.
  • The sun’s rays might still reach your car even if the cover is not properly installed.

Conclusion

For many pop-up camper and RV owners, the time has come to prepare for the winter months.

When it comes to packing it in until the warmer weather arrives, I believe this guide will provide you with all of the information you need to make the necessary preparations. By completing our winterization checklist, you will ensure that no area of your camper is left unattended.

Winterization

When you have the appropriate parts and follow the right procedure, winterizing your camper is a breeze. It is demonstrated in this post how to do this critical activity in less than 20 minutes. Winterization is really important. Several expensive components in your camper, including the water reservoir tank, the water pump, the water filter canister, the electric hot water heater, the cassette toilet, and even the faucets and shower heads, might be destroyed by frozen water. Purchase RV Antifreeze as the first step.

  • Purchase biodegradable and non-toxic RV antifreeze (the pink substance) to use in your vehicle.
  • 2nd Step: Preparation of the Sink Drain Pipe If you don’t want a pool of antifreeze splattered all over the outside of your camper, make sure your grey water discharge line is properly attached so that the pink liquid may be drained directly to the ground.
  • Antifreeze should not be used in your water heater, and it is not suggested either.
  • Thank you very much for taking this action, which alone will preserve your $500 water heater from frost damage.
  • Simply detach the water pump from the water reservoir tank and instead pump antifreeze directly from the plastic container it was stored in during the winter months.
  • You’re now ready to start pumping antifreeze throughout your camper or trailer.
  • Remember to run the hot and cold water at the same time.

Allow a sufficient amount of antifreeze to flow from the faucet to ensure that your sink discharge tube and p-trap are likewise fully stocked with pink antifreeze and therefore winterized.

Keep the internal shower winterized by turning on both the hot and cold knobs (separately) until the pink antifreeze runs out while you’re still inside the camper.

But, just like you did with the sink, don’t forget to pour some antifreeze into the shower drain to winterize the discharge tube and p-trap there as well.

Fresh water used for flushing, however, must be completely drained, first from the fill tube and then from the transparent plastic tube.

First, turn on the cold water until pink antifreeze begins to run, then turn on the hot water.

Try using the wheel ramp mod to tilt your camper and ensure that all of the water drains completely.

Furthermore, keep in mind that, while RV antifreeze sanitizes your water lines and taps, you’ll want to disinfect the water reservoir with a mild bleach solution before using it again.

You may view this video on YouTube directly, as well as on your mobile device while executing the instructions, by going to the following link.

Extra Credit (Optional): Keep in mind that the camper has been winterized.

In order to prevent my family from turning on the water pump switch and all of the faucets, I wrap a little piece of pink duct tape to the switch and all of the faucets.

Extra Points for Using the Compressor (instead of Antifreeze) The majority of the processes outlined above are applicable for connecting an air compressor to an air pump instead of antifreeze, albeit you would not want to switch on the pump at this time.

There are two main reasons why antifreeze is advised.

Second, and maybe even more importantly, employing an air compressor may miss some areas, enabling air to travel over water without entirely draining it out of the water system. This water has the potential to freeze and crack costly components.

How To Winterize Your Tent Trailer

How to Prepare Your Tent Trailer for the Winter Thoroughly clean the inside of the trailer. All items such as aerosol cans, toiletries that may freeze, pillows, coolers, and fishing gear that you may wish to keep somewhere else for the winter should be removed from the vehicle. The exterior of the tent trailer should be cleaned with a moderate detergent, a gentle scrub brush, and plenty of water.

How do you prepare a tent trailer for winter?

There are nine steps to do in order to winterize your RV. Completely defrost and winterize your water system. Remove your batteries and place them in a safe, dry location. The exterior of the RV should be treated with a decent grade wax or protectant. Awnings should be cleaned and dried. Remove, clean, and replace the air conditioning filters. All of the locks and hinges should be serviced. Make use of a dehumidifier to keep mould and mildew from growing.

How do you close a trailer for the winter?

Time to Winterize Your RV – 10 Tips for Closing Up Your Business for the Season The water should be drained and the water pipes should be dried. Antifreeze should be added to the plumping system. Clean. Vents and holes should be covered. Preventing rodents and pests is important. Filling or removing the propane tank is required. Battery-operated devices. Tires are here to stay for a long time.

How do I keep my RV warm in the winter?

Maintaining a comfortable temperature in your RV over the winter For longer stays in severely cold weather, it is ideal to have a dual-fuel heater and to use a hook-up, supplementing your energy supply with gas or diesel as needed. When you’re gone for the day, it’s preferable to leave the heater on at a temperature of roughly 10 degrees Celsius.

Are pop up trailers cold?

They Are Also Exposed to the Cold! Keeping your tent trailer warm might be just as challenging as attempting to keep it cold during the summer months. Because of the thin canvas walls and inadequate insulation, heat will not be efficiently retained. However, this is often only a concern when the outdoor temperature drops below 50 degrees F during the nighttime hours of operation (or you camp in the winter).

What can I leave in camper over winter?

In the home, there are many bunk mattresses stowed beneath a bed. Pillows, blankets, and sheets are kept in the basement in the children’s clothing storage bins. In the camper, towels, linens, and dishrags are stored in sealed totes.

Should you tarp a trailer in the winter?

They are widely available, inexpensive, and can provide some protection; but, they can also cause harm to your RV if not properly installed and maintained. Here are some reasons why you should avoid covering your RV with a tarp: Tarps do not allow for enough ventilation. Moisture that becomes trapped beneath it can create a greenhouse effect, which encourages the growth of mold and mildew in the environment.

Are pop up trailers warm?

Pop up campers are not particularly comfortable in the cold owing to the lack of adequate insulation.

As a result, it will be much more difficult for you to camp in them during the really cold winter months. To summarize, pop-up campers and tent trailers, in general, are not particularly comfortable in the winter. It is possible that you may have to work extra hard to keep them warm.

How can I heat my camper without electricity?

Heaters for RVs and campers that are portable Many portable heaters are powered by electricity, however there are several on the market that are powered by alternate energy sources. Portable space heaters powered by natural gas or propane are a common alternative. They’re small and strong, and they’re perfect for boondocking because they put no strain on your vehicle’s onboard battery bank. 6 days have passed since

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How do you cover a trailer with a tarp?

How to Cover a Trailer with a Tarp (with Pictures) Place the tarp on the front of your cargo of freight so that it is directly in the center of the load. Unroll the tarp so that it is facing the rear of the trailer. Attach bungee cords to each metal ring that runs around the perimeter of the tarp. In order to protect the freight, tuck the front and back overhanging tarp flaps in toward it.

Should I disconnect my RV battery when plugged in?

When storing your camper, make sure the disconnect is switched off to ensure that your batteries deplete more slowly than usual. When you do this while connected to shore power, you also separate your batteries from the charging circuit of your power, which means that even while your rig is connected to shore power, your batteries will not charge.

Can you live in a pop up camper year round?

Living in a pop-up camper is doable in many areas, with the sole drawback being that the walls are made of fabric. When exposed to the outdoors for an extended length of time, the fabric does not provide adequate insulation and wears quickly. A campervan lifestyle is best undertaken in regions with temperate temperatures.

Can you winter camp in a pop-up camper?

Is it possible to operate a pop-up camper in the winter? Even in the winter, pop-up campers may be utilized. However, you must take certain precautions to ensure that you do not end up damaging your camping equipment. Your camper will need to be tailored in such a manner that it will be able to maintain a comfortable temperature.

Can you use a tent trailer in the winter?

Trailer with a tent They don’t maintain their heat for very long. The furnace and generator are essentially running nonstop throughout the night. Even if you’re prepared with a comfortable sleeping bag and clothes to sleep in, it’s still going to be a very chilly night. Ok.

Can you heat a tent trailer?

There is heating and air conditioning available for your comfort. If you’re the kind that enjoys driving in cold weather, you’ll be pleased to know that the contrary is also true. Because the thin walls are poorly insulated, it is difficult to maintain a comfortable temperature inside. It is feasible to outfit your trailer with heating and air conditioning, which is a welcome relief.

How do I winterize my trailer with antifreeze?

Pour a cup of antifreeze down each and every drain in the house. It is important to run your outside shower or taps on both the hot and cold sides until you notice antifreeze. Last but not least, switch off your water pump. This line is where you connect your RV to city water through a check valve.

How do you winterize a tent?

How to properly winterize your tent:Buy a small tent and put it outside. Purchase a tent that is suitable for all four seasons. A tarp should be placed over the top of your tent.

A tarp should be placed at the bottom of your tent. Lay down blankets on the ground floor of your tent. Plastic sheets should be used to line the walls of your tent. Heat packs or battery-operated heaters can be used. Make use of a propane heater (carefully)

Should you cover your pop up camper?

Yes, you absolutely should! If you do not have access to suitable RV storage, it is necessary to cover your RV in order to keep it protected against the weather. RV coverings, RV skirts, and other options can be utilized in addition to the standard tarp route to protect your vehicle.

How Do You Winterize A Tent Trailer?

In this blog article, we will provide a solution to the question: How do you winterize a tent trailer? When it comes to protecting the outside and inside of your tent trailer during the winter, we will go over the best practices.

How do you winterize a tent trailer?

Depending on whether you are keeping your tent trailer outside or indoors, the process of winterizing your tent trailer will be slightly different.

  • When it comes to indoor storage for a tent trailer, there are a number of specialist organizations that provide indoor storage for recreational vehicles of all sorts, including RVs, fifth wheels, trailers, and tent trailers, among others. You may also hire a warehouse or utilize your neighbor’s garage or your cousin’s farm as a storage facility. There may or may not be heat in the room, but it is most definitely not excessively humid and properly ventilated
  • For the purpose of storing the tent trailer outside, do you own or have access to a large lot, parking lot, or even a field? You are more than welcome to park your tent trailer there throughout the winter months. A temporary shelter, similar to the one used for automobiles, will suffice for modest recreational vehicles (as will be the case for trailers and tent trailers).
  • It is critical to have a trailer cover for your tent trailer whether you are keeping it indoors or outdoors for the winter. Large tarps from the hardware store may be used to cover vintage tent trailers. Take cautious not to cover your trailer in aluminum foil like a cooked potato! A wide canvas should be placed beneath the vehicle and another above it to provide for excellent air circulation and to avoid condensation

The coverings will lower the likelihood of water infiltration and will make snow removal easier, which will become essential after the snow has accumulated to a height of around 30cm (one foot). In addition, there are adjustable height poles that may be installed within the tent trailer to help reinforce the ceiling structure.

More tips on winterizing a tent trailer

It is possible to have your tent trailer winterized by a company, but you may also do it yourself (see your owner’s handbook for instructions). The following is a summary of the steps, which are the same for trailers or fifth-wheel trailers equipped with the same equipment as described above:

  • Clean the interior of the car and make sure to check all of the corners. Food cabinets should be emptied, and garbage cans should be emptied. Sealants and gaskets should be replaced as needed. After draining and purging all tanks and pipelines (shower, dishwashing machine, washing machine
  • Sink
  • Water heater, etc.), apply non-toxic RV antifreeze. Don’t forget to check the drains. Install rodent repellents and traps for rats and other pests both indoors and out to keep them at bay. It is important not to close off the external entrances and exits, since this might favor the growth of mold. Turn off the electricity, turn off the gas, and put all of the batteries in a safe, dry location indoors before you leave. Close the blinds to prevent sudden temperature swings, and bring cushions, drapes, and other detachable textiles into the home to keep them from being too hot or too cold. Maintain complete access to the refrigerator and freezer by leaving all doors open. Set the tire pressures in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications
  • Elevate the car and set it on blocks to protect it.

It is likely that your tent trailer will be in good condition during the winter if it has been properly prepared and if it has been kept clear of snow throughout the year. One thing is certain: the completion of these activities will have a direct influence on the correct operation and safety of your trailer, as well as the resale value of the trailer.

How to winterize a tent trailer water systems

It is necessary to do the following in order to winterize your tent trailer water system and prevent the pipes from freezing:

  • Clean the black water tank
  • Using the flushing hose, drain and wash the black water tanks until the water coming through the elbow is clean and clear (see illustration). If your RV is equipped with a “Black Tank Flush” system, you can use it to clean the black tank. Fill the black water tank with the appropriate amount of deodorant. This varies depending on the type of deodorant used and how big your tank is
  • Nevertheless, we recommend around 8 ounces of deodorant per 40 gallons of tank capacity. Make that the hatches on the grey water and black water tanks are open, and that the vented plug is inserted into the wastewater tanks’ outlet. Keep the hatches open to allow for proper ventilation of the tanks. Silicone spray should be used to lubricate the stems of the grey water and black water valves. In the winter, this will help to keep them from sticking together.

The following steps should be taken to winterize the tent trailer plumbing:

  • Locate and shut off the circuit breaker (braker) that is attached to the water heater in the fuse panel. By opening the hatch, you may have access to the water heater from the outside. The water heater should be drained by opening both the drain valve, which is situated at the bottom where the anode is screwed in, and the safety valve, which is positioned at the top. Delete all water from the Fresh Water Tank by opening the valve beneath the tank
  • Activate the drain valves that have been installed in the plumbing (Low Point Drain)
  • Access to the water heater and plumbing valves may be found within the RV, as well as the docking station, which can be found in the front trunk on the left. Close the intake and exit valves on the water heater and open the bypass valve on the water heater.

There are various different setups for the water heater that may be used:

  • One for the water heater input, one for the water heater exit, and one for the bypass pipe are all three valves. Close both the intake and exit valves, as well as the bypass valve, if this is the case. There are two valves: one that enters the water heater and another that exits the water heater. Access to the bypass line will be made available by closing both valves, which are the water heater intake valve and the water heater exit with a valve. Closing the inlet valve to the water heater will allow the bypass line to be opened.

All of the valves are in the same location, and a schematic in the center of the connection shows which valves should be opened or closed depending on the current circumstances. Connect the nozzle of the air compressor to the entrance of the running water (City Water Connection). Air pressure of 30 PSI should be applied to the piping. Plumbing is typically capable of withstanding pressures of up to 45 PSI. To do this, open all hot and cold water taps until nothing but air comes out of the faucets.

  • Turn off the water supply and remove the compressed air nozzle. Find a way to get to the water pump
  • Connect one end of the hose to the water inlet of the pump and the other end into one of the liters of antifreeze to complete the installation. If your pump already has a winterization hose, you may simply turn the valve to switch the hose connection from the freshwater tank to the winterization line. If your pump does not have a winterization hose, you can purchase one here. If you wish to install a winterization hose valve, there is a kit available that is simple to put together
  • If the fitting center is equipped with a water inlet, the hose should be placed there or at the “Winterize” location. Turn on the pump and then turn on all of the cold and hot water faucets one at a time. Shut off the water supply and collect the remaining antifreeze
  • Using the leftover antifreeze, fill in the elbows of the P-traps with water. Remove any extra antifreeze and droplets from the bottom of the accessories to avoid stains on the bottom of the accessories.

Winterizing the tent trailer amenities

  • Make sure to clean the tops of extensions before they close, especially if you are a seasonal camper, unless you have extension awnings installed. Ensure that the rubber seals and the extension mechanism are lubricated. Clean the canvas of the awning. Thus, debris won’t become entangled in the rolled-up canvas and taint it
  • And Roof and gutters should be cleaned
  • Identify and protect your battery’s positive pole wires by wrapping tape over them before disconnecting the battery. This will help you identify the wires and prevent them from coming into touch with metal, which might cause damage to your converter. Remove the battery from your device. It should be kept on wooden blocks to keep out the cold. Make sure you have enough propane. In this way, condensation will not develop in the tank, preventing rusting of the tank’s inside. Use the nozzle that was made specifically for this purpose to clean the interior of the water heater. This causes the lime that has been protecting the tank’s inside to be dislodged. Make sure the water coming from the water heater is clean by rinsing it repeatedly. Remove the batteries from any electronic items that have been left indoors, such as a clock. Half-open the refrigerator door to let in some fresh air. This will allow for better air circulation and the prevention of foul odors. A set of arms to keep the door in place is available for purchase. Install a “No Damp” humidity sensor in the tent trailer, and make sure that the ceiling fan hatches are closed unless they are fitted with a MaxxAir cover to keep the tent trailer dry. If your tent trailer is equipped with MaxxAir, you can circulate the air by slightly opening the fan cover
  • However, this is not recommended. Close the RV stabilizers when not in use. Ground movement during storage can cause the stabilizers and the structure of your tent trailer to shift
  • Make sure to secure the covers and other protective measures before putting them away. Covering your RV with a cover that is not intended for this purpose is not recommended. As a result, plastic sheeting prevents air circulation, causing moisture to accumulate within. You must purchase covers for the wheels, the air conditioning unit, and the propane tanks. Consider using a padlock for the coupling box or a drawbar to secure the coupling box.
See also:  Where To Store Roof Top Tent

The bottom line

It is likely that your tent trailer will be in good condition during the winter if it has been properly prepared and if it has been kept clear of snow throughout the year. One thing is certain: the completion of these activities will have a direct influence on the correct operation and safety of your trailer, as well as the resale value of the trailer. Please do not hesitate to express your opinions on the content of this website.

FAQ onHow do you winterize a tent trailer?

The proper method to store a pop-up caravan is with the top down to avoid damage from the sun and wind.

Extreme temperatures and bad weather will have a greater impact on a pop-top caravan than on other types of RVs and campers.

Should I store my camper water tanks empty or full?

It is best to keep your camper with its water tanks completely empty. If you leave water in your tanks for an extended amount of time, your tank is likely to become infected with viruses and bacteria that are harmful to your health.

How do I prepare my camper for wintering?

Here are some suggestions for preparing your camper for winterization:

  1. Empty and clean the toilet tanks
  2. Empty and clean the water heater. Remove the gas cylinder (or cylinders) from the vehicle. Make sure the windows are in the open position for ventilation. Open the door to the bathroom
  3. It is not necessary to unscrew the feet. It is not necessary to cover the caravan with plastic sheeting. Place the trailer in the garage once it has been cleaned.

References

  • How to Winterize Any Tent for Winter Camping – Core Mountaineering
  • How to Winterize a Pop-Up Camper – Beckley’s RV Blog
  • How to Winterize a Tent for Winter Camping – Core Mountaineering
  • You may find instructions on how to winterize a popup camper (tent trailer) on YouTube.

Winterizing Your Flagstaff Camping Trailer

The following are the six sections of the water system that are most at danger of freezing:

  • Water heater ($$$)
  • Cassette toilet/toilet ($$$$)
  • Water tank ($$)
  • Water pump ($$)
  • Water filter canister ($$)
  • Faucet(s) ($)
  • Cassette toilet/toilet ($$$)

For whatever reason you are unable to completely winterize your camper (you don’t have time to winterize before a freezing night, you are out of town and a neighbor is attempting to save the day, etc.), and you want to minimize the potential damage that freezing temperatures can cause, the following steps should be taken: unplug the water heater (step 34 in Hot Water section below). This alone might save you hundreds of dollars in repair costs in the long run. If you have more time on your hands but no antifreeze and no air compressor, the gravity drain is the next best thing to try.

Gravity Drain

When it comes to hot water systems, most Flagstaffs offer a “gravity drain” option that is accomplished with two simple shut-off valves. Locate the two T-handle valves on the camper’s floor and turn them on (usually on the floor under the galley, under the exterior shower, or in a corner of the camper box). Open all of the valves, as well as the sink faucet (to break the vacuum), and water should run out of the camper using nothing more than gravity, if everything is working properly. Water can still accumulate at low areas in the water line, and water in the water filter canister will not be able to leave because of the gravity drain.

A More Thorough Winterizing Procedure:

Please keep in mind that most pop-up campers may be winterized using non-toxic RV anti-freeze or an air compressor. Both strategies are described in detail in the following instructions.

Choose your camper’s water system:

  1. Fill and empty the cold water tank (bend the tank drain valve 180 degrees to the drain position)
  2. Disconnect from the water pump the hose fitting that connects the cold water tank supply line to the pump (the direction of water flow is indicated by an arrow imprinted on the pump’s plastic, and make sure the water pump is switched off)
  3. Make sure you have a towel ready since even after the pump is switched off, a tiny quantity of water will trickle out of it
Anti-Freeze
  1. A second line (about 24″ in length) should be connected to the pump’s input, with the other end of the hose being placed into a jug of anti-freeze. Activate the water pump and open the faucet
  2. When the water flowing out of the faucet begins to turn pink, switch off the water pump. To allow anti-freeze to pass through the drain line and protect the p-trap, unscrew and remove the sink drain plug/strainer. Firstly, disconnect the short hose from the pump (have a towel ready in case any anti-freeze leaks out), and then reconnect the connection from the cold water tank to the pump.
Air
  1. Insert an air nozzle/air blower into the pump’s inlet and use a cloth, paper towel, or glove to form a temporary seal between the nozzle and pump fitting (a threaded connection is not required, although it isn’t bad to have one). Turn on the water faucet
  2. Breathe air through the line until only a little trace of water vapor is seen flowing out of the faucet
  3. Repeat as necessary. Repair or replace the pipe that runs from the cold water tank to the pump. To remove water from the p-trap, open the sink drain stopper and repeat the blow out technique for the drain line as described above.
  1. Fill and empty the cold water tank (bend the tank drain valve 180 degrees to the drain position)
  2. Make sure that the bypass connections on the backside of the water heater (which is within the camper) are set to the “bypass” position (see bypass information). Open the water heater access door and the pressure-relief valve on the front-side of the water heater (from the outside of the camper) to allow water to enter. Remove the water heater drain plug (this requires a 1 1/16″ socket) to drain the water from the water heater (keep a safe distance between yourself and the water as it pours out in a rushing motion)
  3. The anode rod attached to the drain plug should be checked and replaced if necessary (see anode details). The pressure relief valve should be closed and the drain plug should be reinstalled once the water heater tank has been drained. When using a water filter in your camper, remove the filter from the canister and replace the canister in its original position (empty). The water pump should be located and removed, as well as the hose fitting that connects the cold water tank supply line to the pump (an arrow is stamped on the plastic of the pump that indicates the direction of water flow)
  4. Make sure you have a towel nearby in case a tiny quantity of water drips out of the pump
Anti-Freeze
  1. A second line (about 24″ in length) should be connected to the pump’s input, with the other end of the hose being placed into a jug of anti-freeze. Activate the water pump and open the cold-water faucet on the sink’s right side
  2. The water flowing out of the faucet should be turning pink at this point
  3. Thus, turn off the cold-water side while simultaneously turning on the hot-water side until it is turning pink as well
  4. This procedure should be repeated for the outdoor shower. Turn off the water pump and open either side of the faucet again to relieve any pressure that has built up as a result of the water pump. Remove the sink drain plug to allow the anti-freeze to pass through the drain line and keep the p-trap from freezing. Firstly, disconnect the short hose from the pump (have a towel ready in case any anti-freeze leaks out), and then reconnect the connection from the cold water tank to the pump. Using the water filter canister, remove it from the faucet and pour the anti-freeze into the sink. Replace the canister (which is now empty) in its original location.
Air
  1. Insert an air nozzle/air blower into the pump’s inlet and use a cloth, paper towel, or glove to form a temporary seal between the nozzle and pump fitting (a threaded connection is not required, although it isn’t bad to have one). Open the faucet on the cold-water side of the sink
  2. Breathe air through the line until only a little trace of water vapor is seen flowing out of the faucet
  3. Repeat as necessary. Close the cold-water side of the faucet and switch on the hot-water side. Replicate the blow-out procedure for the hot-water side, followed by each side of the outdoor shower
  4. Repair or replace the pipe that runs from the cold water tank to the pump. To remove water from the p-trap, open the sink drain stopper and repeat the blow out technique for the drain line as described above. Once again, remove the water filter canister and empty the container of any residual water. Replace the canister (which is now empty) in its original location.

In order to winterize a camper with a hot water system, follow the guidelines listed above for the water system (adding the interior shower faucet to the instructions, of course.) Then follow the directions for using the cassette toilet. To winterize the cassette toilet, do the following:

  1. Open the access door to the cassette toilet (which is located outside the trailer)
  2. Using your hands, pull the fill tube out and open the cap (just as if you were filling the tank with new water)
  3. Ensure that the fill tube is rotated so that any water remaining in the tube may drain out (on to the ground). Once the fill tube is completely empty, put the cap on the tube and set it back in its storage location. Remove the glass indicator tube from its holder, which is located at the bottom of the access area. Pull the glass indicator tube downward until it separates from its rubber cap towards the top of the access area
  4. This should take around 30 seconds. Swing the glass tube outside of the access area and hang it upside-down to allow the fresh water in the cassette tank to drain. The glass tube should be replaced into its rubber top and holder once all of the water has been drained from it. Ensure that the access door is closed.
  1. Fill and empty the cold water tank (bend the tank drain valve 180 degrees to the drain position)
  2. Make sure that the bypass connections on the backside of the water heater (which is within the camper) are set to the “bypass” position (see bypass information). Open the water heater access door and the pressure-relief valve on the front-side of the water heater (from the outside of the camper) to allow water to enter. Remove the water heater drain plug (this requires a 1 1/16″ socket) to drain the water from the water heater (keep a safe distance between yourself and the water as it pours out in a rushing motion)
  3. The anode rod attached to the drain plug should be checked and replaced if necessary (see anode details). The pressure relief valve should be closed and the drain plug should be reinstalled once the water heater tank has been drained. When using a water filter in your camper, remove the filter from the canister and replace the canister in its original position (empty). Locate the water pump (which is typically hidden behind an access panel in High Wall units) and disconnect the hose fitting that connects the cold water tank supply line to the pump (the direction of water flow is indicated by an arrow imprinted on the pump’s plastic housing)
  4. Make sure you have a towel nearby in case a tiny quantity of water drips out of the pump
Anti-Freeze
  1. A second line (about 24″ in length) should be connected to the pump’s input, with the other end of the hose being placed into a jug of anti-freeze. Activate the water pump and open the cold-water faucet on the sink’s right side
  2. The water flowing out of the faucet should be turning pink at this point
  3. Thus, turn off the cold-water side while simultaneously turning on the hot-water side until it is turning pink as well
  4. Repeat this procedure for both the outdoor shower and the inner shower, if necessary. Activate the toilet flush lever by pulling it forward and allowing the water to flow until it becomes pink. Turn off the water pump and open either side of the faucet again to relieve any pressure that has built up as a result of the water pump. Remove the sink drain plug to allow the anti-freeze to pass through the drain line and keep the p-trap from freezing. Firstly, disconnect the short hose from the pump (have a towel ready in case any anti-freeze leaks out), and then reconnect the connection from the cold water tank to the pump. Using the water filter canister, remove it from the faucet and pour the anti-freeze into the sink. Replace the canister (which is now empty) in its original location. Drain any remaining water in the holding tanks by opening the gray water tank (or emptying the black water tank at a disposal station)
Air

A High Wall camper’s water lines are lengthy and complicated; thus, we recommend winterizing High Wall campers with anti-freeze, as stated above. Return to the Articles and Tutorials page. Return to the top of the page Roberts Sales is committed to protecting your privacy from 2009 through 2022. All intellectual property rights are retained.

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