How Much Does The Lightheart Gear Solo Tent Weigh

LightHeart Solo Tent Sil-Nylon

  • Three-season, totally enclosed, and spacious for one person
  • Approximately 30 square feet of floor space, 27 ounces (before seam sealing). 43 inches of headroom, 133 inches of length, and 65 inches of width at the middle
  • Imported fabric with silicone coating on both sides, 30D ripstop nylon 66 with a hydrostatic head of over 3500mm, manufactured in the United Kingdom. 1.4 ounces per square yard (after coating)
  • Colors (tent/floor): Cranberry/Pewter, Pewter/Cranberry, Steel Blue/Pewter, Woodland Camo/Gray
  • Colors (tent/floor): Cranberry/Pewter, Pewter/Cranberry, Steel Blue/Pewter, Woodland Camo/Gray
  • Tent with a completely double walled construction
  • There is one huge side entry door with a two-way zipper. There is only one pocket. The rain fly is just 3 inches above the ground
  • Yet, A little vestibule where you may keep your boots
  • Bathtub with an 8-inch floor
  • Contains a ridge pole, a matching stuff pouch, and luminous tie-out cords. Velcro tabs for attaching the ridge pole
  • Setup necessitates the use of a pair of trekking/tent poles measuring 125 cm or longer (not provided)
  • It is necessary to use 8 stakes. The lateral ridge pole linking the inverted trekking/tent poles allows the full headroom height to be useable space, and the tent is extremely sturdy under wind loads because of this feature. It’s best suited for hikers under 5’10” in height
  • It requires seam sealing before usage. The non-reflective (solid black) webbings and non-reflective tie out cable are the only features of the camouflage variant. Stakes are available for purchase separately. Optional tent poles are available for purchase separately, as are optional orange zipper closures.

Instructions:

  • Mark the front and rear corners of the tent with stakes to ensure that the floor is only slightly taut
  • Temporarily stake out both sides of the tent floor — the floor should be in the shape of a diamond – and set up the tent. Lie down on the floor of the tent’s floor with the tent’s ‘ceiling’ perched on top of your head and unzip the mesh entrance on the other side. Into the tent in front of you, insert both trekking poles, expanded to a length of between 120 cm and 125 cm handle first
  • One trekking pole tip should be inserted into one side of the ridge pole. While you lift the ridge pole to the ceiling, slide the handle of your trekking pole into the middle of the side wall panel of your tent, holding it in one hand as you do so. In order to keep the ridge pole in place, Velcro has been used. Placing the second trekking pole tip into the other end of the ridge pole and sliding the second trekking pole handle to its proper position while still holding the ridge pole at the ceiling Make sure the tent body is tight by extending both trekking poles to about 130 cm. Check to see that the ridge pole is centered in the ceiling and that it is securely fastened with velcro
  • Re-stake one tip of the tent in a bit closer to the ground if there is any slack in the sidewalls of the tent and you are unable to stretch the trekking poles any more. In order to reduce the distance between the two stakes, Remove the two stakes from the side corners of the tent and use them to stake out the fly at this point. The fly will go all the way down to the ground surface. (You may substitute two additional stakes and leave the corners staked in place.) When the floor is correctly installed, there should be no pull lines or wrinkles in the surface. Make any necessary adjustments to the stakes in order to achieve a smooth surface. It is possible that silnylon will stretch and droop somewhat if it is subjected to strong rain or high humidity. Fortunately, this is typical and will soon return to normal
  • Extra tie-outs are supplied on both the tent body and the tent fly to accommodate larger groups. These additional tie outs come in handy when there is a lot of wind and rain. The tie outs on the tent body (between the window mesh and bathtub floor) should be pulled out just approximately one inch, so that the bathtub wall is vertical. This will provide additional volume within the tent, particularly at the head and feet. The back rain fly may be rolled up approximately 2/3 of the way and secured in place with the elastic cord and toggle
  • This allows for cross ventilation.
  • Used for three seasons, the Double Wall design sleeps one or more people. It weighs 27 ounces before seam sealing, has 43 inches of head room, has one pocket, and has one door. The floor area is 30 square feet, and the vestibule is 3.75 square feet. The material is 1.1 ounces per square yard of sil-nylon. The pole length is 130 centimeters.

Putting the tent together makes it much easier to seam seal the tent after it has been assembled. You must apply a silicone-based seam sealer, such as McNett SilNet seam sealant, to prevent the seams from fraying.

  • 1. Seam seal the fly from the OUTSIDE in the following ways: Seal the entire ridge line of the tent from tip to tip
  • 2. Seam seal the floor patches from the INSIDE of the tent as well as the seam in the floor
  • 3. Seal the entire ridge line of the tent from tip to tip
  • 4. Seal the entire ridge line of the tent from tip to tip
  • 5. Seal the entire ridge line of the tent from tip to tip
  • 6. Seal the entire ridge line of the tent from tip to tip
  • 7. Seal the entire ridge line of the tent from tip to tip
  • It is beneficial to lay a few rows of seam sealer along the floor to offer traction
  • 3. Seam seal the borders of the bathtub floor for at least one foot from either end of the tent
  • 4.

You may produce your own seam sealer by following the instructions below. Clear silicone caulk is a type of caulk that is transparent (Purchased at any hardware store.) Mineral spirits are a type of solvent that is commonly used to clean paint brushes. Apply the sealer with a tiny brush – a little foam brush works nicely for this. Silicone should be diluted. Pour mineral spirits and silicone caulk into a glass container and shake vigorously to combine (1 oz mineral spirits and 1 oz silicone should beenough.) Combine well, thoroughly combine.

When the mixture has reached the proper consistency, it will be smooth and milky in appearance, and it will flow smoothly when applied.

LightHeart Solo Awning Tent – Sil-Nylon

  • One-person tent with three seasons and plenty of space
  • Before seam sealing, the weight was 28.5 oz. 30 square feet of floor space
  • 43 inches of headroom, 133 inches of length, and 65 inches of width at the middle
  • Imported fabric – 30D ripstop nylon 66 with a hydrostatic head of over 3500mm, silicone coated on both sides, and silicone coated on one side alone. 1.4 oz/sq.yd. after application of coating
  • These are the colors used for the tent and floor: Cranberry/Pewter, Pewter/Pewter, Steel Blue/Pewter, Woodland Camouflage/Gray
  • 1 pocket
  • 1 huge side entrance door
  • 1 large front entry door a rain fly that is only three inches above the ground
  • The back vestibule is somewhat small. A large front awning (which requires an awning pole, which must be purchased separately)
  • Contains a ridge pole, a matching stuff pouch, and luminous tie out string. Velcro tabs for attaching the ridge pole
  • The setup requires a pair of trekking/tent poles measuring approximately 125 cm in length (not provided)
  • It is necessary to use eight stakes. Inverted trekking (tent) poles are connected by a lateral ridge pole, which maximizes usable space by making the entire headroom height usable space and makes the tent extremely stable under wind loads. Suitable for hikers under 5’10” in height
  • Prior to usage, it is necessary to seal the seams. Non-reflective (black) webbings and a non-reflective tie out cable are included in the camouflage variant. Stakes are offered separately. Optional tent poles are available for purchase separately, as are optional zipper pulls.

SoLong 6 – Sil-Poly fabric

  • A 3-season, completely enclosed, spacious one-plus-person home
  • Dimensions: Weight 2 lbs. (before seam sealing), Floor Area: 30 square feet With 45 inches of headroom and 100 inches of length, 55 inches broad in the center, and tapering to 30 inches at each end, this room is ideal for a family of four. Imported fabric with silicone coating on both sides, 20D micro ripstop polyester with a hydrostatic head of over 3500mm, which was manufactured in the United Kingdom. 1.1 ounces per square yard (after coating)
  • Tent and floor colors include: Steel Blue/Silver, Silver/Steel Blue, Woodland Camo/Coyote, and more. Design with a hybrid single and double wall
  • Two huge side entry doors with two-way zippers are provided. The awning has two huge ridge vents, one pocket, and a zippered fly in the front. Fly with a zipper on the rear
  • Standard fly. bathtub with an 8-inch floor
  • All seams are double stitched for added strength. 10 inch carbon fiber stays are sewed into the corners to form a box around the corners of the bike. LineLocsTM are located on all four corners of the tent to allow for precise tensioning of the canvas. Contains a ridge pole, a matching stuff pouch, and luminous tie-out cords. Velcro tabs for attaching the ridge pole
  • Setup necessitates the use of a pair of trekking/tent poles measuring 130 cm or longer (not provided)
  • It is necessary to use 6 stakes. The lateral ridge pole linking the inverted trekking/tent poles allows the full headroom height to be useable space, and the tent is extremely sturdy under wind loads because of this feature. Prior to usage, it is necessary to seal the seams. The non-reflective (solid black) webbings and non-reflective tie out cable are the only features of the camouflage variant. Separately sold are stakes and an awning pole. Tent poles are available for purchase separately. Optional orange zipper pulls are available for purchase separately.

One or two people can stay in this 3-season, totally enclosed space. Dimensions: Weight: 2 lbs. (before seam sealing), floor area : 30 square feet With 45 inches of headroom and 100 inches of length, 55 inches broad in the center, and tapering to 30 inches at each end, this vehicle is a dream come true. Imported fabric: 20D micro ripstop polyester with a silicone coating on both sides and a hydrostatic head of over 3500mm. After coating, it weighs 1.1oz per square yard. Tent and floor colors include: Steel Blue/Silver, Silver/Steel Blue, Woodland Camo/Coyote, and Woodland Camo.

  1. Two huge ridge vents; one pocket; and an awning fly with a zipper on the front of the jacket are also included.
  2. tub base 8 inches in height Double stitching is used on all seams.
  3. Tent tensioning is made easier with LineLocsTM on all four corners.
  4. When setting up, a pair of trekking/tent poles (130 cm or longer) is required; however, these are not provided.
  5. When the inverted hiking tent poles are connected by a lateral ridge pole, the complete headroom height becomes available for use, and the tent becomes extremely sturdy under wind loads.
  6. Only non-reflective (solid black) webbings and a non-reflective tie out cable are included in the camouflage variant.
  7. Tent poles are available as an optional extra.
  • Tent stakes should be placed at each of the tent’s four corners, with the floor somewhat taut. Check to see that the sides are squared off and parallel. Lie down on the floor of the tent’s floor with the tent’s ‘ceiling’ perched on top of your head and unzip the mesh entrance on the other side. Placing both trekking poles into the tent in front of you, handle first, at a length of between 120 cm and 125 cm is recommended. One trekking pole tip should be inserted into one side of the ridge pole. While you lift the ridge pole to the ceiling, slide the handle of your trekking pole into the middle of the side wall panel of your tent, holding it in one hand as you do so. In order to keep the ridge pole in place, Velcro has been used. Placing the second trekking pole tip into the other end of the ridge pole and sliding the second trekking pole handle to its proper position while still holding the ridge pole at the ceiling Make sure the tent body is tight by extending both trekking poles to about 130 cm. Check to see that the ridge pole is centered in the ceiling and that it is securely fastened with velcro
  • As you step out of the tent, make any necessary adjustments to the Line Locks at the tent’s four corners to ensure that the corners are standing properly and that there is no slack in the tent’s end walls. Now, using the tie out cords that were given, secure the fly in place. The fly will not make it all the way down to the surface of the water. A good rule of thumb is to keep the fly 4 inches from the ground to allow for ventilation under the fly. If there is a lot of rain or high humidity, silnylon will stretch and droop somewhat. This is typical, and you may adjust the tent’s tightness by extending the trekking poles a bit more and/or re-staking the tent. AWNING: To hang the awning, insert one end of an awning pole into the grommet at one end of the awning and adjust its position so that the awning hangs tight. It will be necessary to stake out the tie out loop with a line lock located at the apex of the awning. Removing the awning pole (do not remove the stake from the tie out cord for the awning) and attaching two small carabiners to the loop of the line lock (which is at the tip of the awning) and the two loops that are approximately 18 inches from the tip of the awning will allow you to lower the awning for’storm mode.’ Using your hands, tighten the tie-out line that runs from one end of your awning to the other, so that the fly is now folded and your awning appears the same as it did before. By connecting the toggle on the awning’s bottom to the little loop on the tent’s exterior, you can roll it up for full views and ventilation. The elastic cord with a toggle is located on the tent’s outside, and there is a small loop at the top of the tent.
  • Three-season use
  • Hybrid -Double/Single wall construction
  • Sleeps 1 or 2 people
  • Weighs 2 pounds
  • Has 45-inch head room
  • Has 1 pocket
  • Has 2 doors
  • Has 2 ridge vents. Floor Area:30 Sq. Ft
  • sVestibules:(2) 5.4 Sq. Ft
  • sFloor Dimensions:L – 100 in. W – 55 in. in middle and tapers to 30 in. at either end
  • Material:3500 mm hydrostatic head waterproof fabric, 1.1 oz silicone impregnated ripstop polyester (silpoly)
  • Pole Length: 130cm
  • Number of Stakes Needed: 6

New for 2022 SoLong 6 – Sil-Nylon

  • A 3-season, completely enclosed, spacious one-plus-person home
  • Dimensions: Weight 2 lbs. (before seam sealing), Floor Area: 30 square feet With 45 inches of headroom and 100 inches of length, 55 inches broad in the center, and tapering to 30 inches at each end, this room is ideal for a family of four. Imported fabric with silicone coating on both sides, 30D ripstop nylon 66 with a hydrostatic head of over 3500mm, manufactured in the United Kingdom. 1.4 ounces per square yard (after coating)
  • Design with a hybrid single and double wall
  • Two huge side entry doors with two-way zippers are provided. Two huge closeable Ridge vents
  • One Pocket
  • Two large openable Ridge vents Awning fly with a zipper on the front of the awning. Fly with a zipper on the rear
  • Standard fly. From the ground to the bottom of the netting, there is an 8 inch gap in the bathtub floor. All seams are double stitched for added strength. 10 inch carbon fiber stays are sewed into the corners to form a box around the corners of the bike. A ridge pole, matching stuff sack, and luminous tie-out cords are included, as well as LineLocsTM on all four corners for precise tensioning of the tent. Velcro tabs for attaching the ridge pole
  • Setup necessitates the use of a pair of trekking/tent poles measuring 130 cm or longer (not provided)
  • It is necessary to use 6 stakes. The lateral ridge pole linking the inverted trekking/tent poles allows the full headroom height to be useable space, and the tent is extremely sturdy under wind loads because of this feature. Prior to usage, it is necessary to seal the seams. Additional accessories like as stakes and an awning pole are available for purchase separately. Optional tent poles and orange zipper pulls are also available for purchase separately.
See also:  Why Did Lakewood Sue Tent City

Instructions:

  • Tent stakes should be placed at each of the tent’s four corners, with the floor somewhat taut. Check to see that the sides are squared off and parallel. Lie down on the floor of the tent’s floor with the tent’s ‘ceiling’ perched on top of your head and unzip the mesh entrance on the other side. Placing both trekking poles into the tent in front of you, handle first, at a length of between 120 cm and 125 cm is recommended. One trekking pole tip should be inserted into one side of the ridge pole. While you lift the ridge pole to the ceiling, slide the handle of your trekking pole into the middle of the side wall panel of your tent, holding it in one hand as you do so. In order to keep the ridge pole in place, Velcro has been used. Placing the second trekking pole tip into the other end of the ridge pole and sliding the second trekking pole handle to its proper position while still holding the ridge pole at the ceiling Make sure the tent body is tight by extending both trekking poles to about 130 cm. Check to see that the ridge pole is centered in the ceiling and that it is securely fastened with velcro
  • As you step out of the tent, make any necessary adjustments to the Line Locks at the tent’s four corners to ensure that the corners are standing properly and that there is no slack in the tent’s end walls. Now, using the tie out cords that were given, secure the fly in place. The fly will not make it all the way down to the surface of the water. A good rule of thumb is to keep the fly 4 inches from the ground to allow for ventilation under the fly. If there is a lot of rain or high humidity, silnylon will stretch and droop somewhat. This is typical, and you may adjust the tent’s tightness by extending the trekking poles a bit more and/or re-staking the tent. AWNING: To hang the awning, insert one end of an awning pole into the grommet at one end of the awning and adjust its position so that the awning hangs tight. It will be necessary to stake out the tie out loop with a line lock located at the apex of the awning. Removing the awning pole (do not remove the stake from the tie out cord for the awning) and attaching two small carabiners to the loop of the line lock (which is at the tip of the awning) and the two loops that are approximately 18 inches from the tip of the awning will allow you to lower the awning for’storm mode.’ Using your hands, tighten the tie-out line that runs from one end of your awning to the other, so that the fly is now folded and your awning appears the same as it did before. By connecting the toggle on the awning’s bottom to the little loop on the tent’s exterior, you can roll it up for full views and ventilation. The elastic cord with a toggle is located on the tent’s outside, and there is a small loop at the top of the tent.
  • In order to protect the tent’s floor from sagging, stake out the tent’s four corners. Check to see that the sides are squared off and parallel to one another. Lie down on the floor of the tent’s floor with the tent’s ‘ceiling’ perched on top of your head and unzip the mesh entrance on one side. Into the tent in front of you, place both trekking poles, expanded to a length of between 120 cm and 125 cm, handle first. Using one trekking pole tip, insert it into the ridge pole on one side. As you lift the ridge pole to the ceiling, slide the handle of your trekking pole into the middle of the side wall panel of your tent with one hand while maintaining your grip on the pole. In order to hold the ridge pole in place, Velcro has been used. Placing the second trekking pole tip into the other end of the ridge pole and sliding the second trekking pole handle to its proper position while maintaining control of the ridge pole at the ceiling Make sure the tent body is tight by extending both trekking poles to approximately 130 cm in length. Ascertain that the ridge pole is centered in the ceiling and that it is securely fastened in place with velcro
  • And As you step out of the tent, make any necessary adjustments to the Line Locks at the tent’s four corners to ensure that the corners are standing properly and that there is no slack in the tent’s end walls
  • Use the tie out cords that were given to secure the fly. Despite its efforts, the fly will not make it down to the earth. A good rule of thumb is to keep the fly 4 inches off the ground to allow for ventilation under the fly. If there is a lot of rain or humidity, silnylon will stretch and droop a little. As a regular occurrence, you may adjust the tent’s tension by extending the trekking poles a bit farther and/or re-staking the tent. For the AWNING, insert the tip of the awning pole into the grommet at the tip of the awning and adjust the positioning of the pole so that the awning is taut, if needed. It will be necessary to stake out the tie out loop with a line lock located at the end of the awning. Removing the awning pole (do not remove the stake from the tie out cord for the awning) and attaching two small carabiners to the loop of the line lock (which is at the tip of the awning) and the two loops that are approximately 18 inches from the tip of the awning will allow you to lower the awning for a storm mode situation. Close and tighten the tie-out line that runs to the end of the awning so that the fly is now folded and the awning seems to be the same as the usual fly side. By connecting the toggle on the awning’s bottom to the little loop on the tent’s exterior, you may roll it up for full views and ventilation. The elastic rope with a toggle is located on the tent’s outside, and it is attached to a small loop at the top of the tent.

LightHeart Gear Solo Reviews – Trailspace

I’m a repeat client; I’ve worn out one pair and replaced it with another. Pros I typically use this tent in the Sierra Nevada, along the California coast, at state parks that allow backpacking, and on the rare occasion that I travel outside of the state boundaries (such as the Ruby Mountains in eastern Nevada). I also use it in the mountains where rocks are necessary to support the stake out points because there are no places to sink stakes because there are no places to sink stakes. The most of the weekends, with a few exceptions, I am out doing something.

  1. If I’m sleeping in a tent, I’m either in this tent or in my boyfriend’s 3-persontarptent, depending on the situation.
  2. Groundhog stakes (MSR Groundhog stakes) are used on the ends and on the flies.
  3. Condensation can collect at the ends of the fly when it is close to, or directly on, the mesh at times.
  4. Only on rare occasions do I see excessive amounts of condensation—on very humid days, condensation can accumulate on both sides of the fly, and there isn’t much I can do about it.
  5. It has absolutely nothing to do with the pitch or the tent.
  6. Accept it and go on.
  7. This is the quickest configuration.

When you use a Lightheart, one of the advantages is that you can stake it out, put it up, drag in the pack, and reduce the amount of rain that comes inside with you.

My second tent differs from my previous tent in a few ways, as you can see here.

Judy appears to be attentive to comments and to make little adjustments as she goes through the process.

There were a few snags in the weave.

Other manufacturers may be able to provide a lighter tent.

I appreciate not having to mess with hubbed, aluminum poles and inner tents.

I appreciate the simplicity and durability. Because I utilize my equipment on a regular basis, I’ve worn out a lot of stuff over the years. I expect the present cranberry/pewter concept to have a successful run in the future.

Gear Review: Lightheart Solo Tent — ruby throat journal

I finally had the opportunity to put my new tent, theLightheart Gear Solotent, through its paces on an overnight walk along the Art Loeb Trail and then on a road trip to New Hampshire with my family. (There will be more on that epic odyssey in the near future!) Three factors influenced my decision to purchase this tent.

  1. The weight is advertised on the internet as 27 ounces (1 pound, 11 ounces)
  2. However, the weight is really 1 pound, 11 ounces. This trail comes highly recommended by some of my new Trail Dames friends
  3. It’s made by a firm that’s rather close to me

Not to mention that the color purple didn’t go unnoticed by everyone. Because, while there is a lot to like about this tent, there are a few things that, if I had given it a little more thought, would have been deal-breakers. For the time being, I’m going to give it a 6/10 because, while there is a lot to like about this tent, there are a few things that would have been deal-breakers if I had given it a little more thought. The yays are listed below. The Sad Furs were the band that came after them.

1.Itislightweight, with caveats.

It would be nice if manufacturers were more forthright about this on their websites.) After you factor in the seam sealing, stakes (which, however, must be purchased separately), and the ground cover, the total weight amounts to 38 ounces (2 lb, 6 oz). As a result, the tent performs as expected for a lightweight model. It’s not a show-stopper. Just a mediocre performance.

2.It sets up with trekking poles.

Instead of carrying tent poles on your back, you’re using them to double as trekking poles, which saves you the trouble of carrying both. Extra credit for doing double duty.

3.It’s roomy, with 30 square feet of floor space.

Big enough for myself, my pack and my dog. (The poodle weights 75 pounds, but when he curls up, he becomes quite compact.) In all seriousness, 30 square feet is a shitload of space for a single-person tent.

4.Headroom!

Even a tall person (which is not my problem) could comfortably sit up in the center, which measures 43 inches in diameter. At the very least, in the center.

5.It packs down really, really small.

Lightheart Solo is at the top of the list. MSR Hubba Hubba is at the bottom of the mountain.

6.It’s made in the US and the company is local (to me).

After all of the extras (seam sealing, stakes, and a tyvek footprint), I ended up paying $335 instead of the $260 stated. Not too shabby for lightweight equipment.

8.It’s purple!

Yes, I understand! Before you dismiss me because I am concerned with little details such as color, please consider the following. Colordoesmatter. At the very least, for a tent. Continue reading to find out why.

1.It’s purple.

Yes, I am well aware that I just stated that I adore the color, and I do. Purple is one of my favorite colors. Perhaps not for a tent, though. The reason behind this is as follows. We carried two different tents with us on our overnight trip this week. When my husband was putting our MSR Hubba Hubba tent together, I realized why I had purchased it in the first place. It’s a bright yellow color! In addition, I’m not a huge lover of the color yellow. Yellow, on the other hand, is a nice color. Given that you may be trapped inside a small tent reading and playing cards when it is pouring, a light-colored tent will enable more light to enter the tent.

In addition to being able to see your thumbs as you twiddle them.

Any action we can do to boost our satisfaction and our chances of success is something we should undertake. And it might be as easy as picking out a tent that would brighten up a gloomy afternoon.

2.Tiny vestibule.

This is not a major concern because there is so much floor space and the modest (3.75 ft2) vestibule is just right for my boots and other belongings. However, I may not want to bring my stinking backpack into my tent with me. It would be wonderful if the entryway were a little larger. (To be fair, Lightheart Gear does manufacture a tent that has an awning.) You can find it here. It is exclusively available in camouflage. Anything in camouflage is a deal-breaker for me.)

3.Set up is a little tricky.

In order to put up the tent, you must first enter it, and getting the corners lined up and the floor wrinkle-free takes a lot of repetition. I had the impression that I needed my instruction manual with me because I wanted everything to be flawless. It wasn’t the case. And I had a good night’s sleep. This image is taken from the website and is just beautiful. Mine is still a touch saggy in the middle and has a few crinkles.

4.Tent platforms are not friendly to trekking pole tents.

I was fine with all of the negative aspects of the situation until we traveled to New Hampshire. In the White Mountains, the official tent sites are (for the most part) elevated platforms perched over steep, uneven terrain. This is why most AT hikers prefer a tent that can be set up independently. MSR Hubba Hubba was ready to go at a moment’s notice, and there was no time to waste. To get the Lightheart Solo to provide me with a roof over my head, I had to go through a lot of painstaking effort.

Just to get the thing to stand on its own two feet.

What a sad fur!

Platforms combined with a non-freestanding tent equals an ache in the buttocks.

5.The downside of shopping local….less generous repair and return policies.

When the fly failed, we’d camped in our Hubba Hubba for a number of nights (maybe thirty). MSR provided us a completely new tent,no questions asked, free of charge (after we’d given back the quirky fly.) I have the idea that Lightheart Gear will work with me, but that questionswillbe asked and the first inquiry will be, “What’s your credit card number?”. So it’s tempting to just head over to REI (with a scale) and take a closer look at (and weigh) the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL. Because the return policies of the larger corporations are more favorable.

*Please keep in mind that, as the past owner of a small art gallery/frame store, I will still go out of my way to support a small company, particularly one that is run by a woman.

Small firms, in particular, require every bit of assistance they can receive. Furthermore, supporting small enterprises allows ordinary people to live their lives on their own terms. There are two other things to know about the Lightheart Gear Solo.

  1. For the best results, you’ll need a total of ten stakes. If you get the Tyvek ground cloth, you will find that it is not as loud as it appears as it is being unfolded. It is not going to keep you up at night.
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At least, that’s what I’ve learned thus far about my Lightheart Gear Solo tent. After meeting the platforms in the Whites, I made the mistake of revising my rating. I’m giving it a 6 out of 10. However, I doubt that this will be my thru-hiking tent since I like one that can be set up fast and effortlessly without the need for any contortions. I’m even thinking about investing in a hammock, so keep tuned for further discoveries in that route. What do you consider to be the most significant consideration when selecting a tent for your camping or thru-hiking excursions?

Let’s continue the discourse in this manner!

Turtle Bear, have a wonderful hike!

Lightheart Gear Solo Tent – 1 Year Review – Ultralight Backpacking Tent

This is the solo cardiac gear that is low in weight. Since I’ve been using this tent for about fifteen or sixteen nights, I’ve been asked to write a full-on detailed, well, kind of comprehensive review of it. I’m going to do just that. Every day in the comments section, people ask me about this product and whether or not I would suggest it to others. In this article, we’ll go over all you need to know about it. All of the qualities about this tent that I don’t particularly care for are things that I absolutely appreciate about it.

  • Alright.
  • Here’s a brief rundown of the features and specifications of this tent.
  • It has a weight of 27 ounces.
  • It truly does not have 10 poles as some people believe.
  • That was an option, and I decided to go ahead and have them do it because I didn’t want to fool with it.
  • Nevertheless, the very first thing that I’d want to discuss is why I purchased this tent, because they clearly weren’t aware of both the extremely fantastic and the pretty awful aspects of it prior to my purchase.
  • I was really in the planning phases of walking the Appalachian Trail in its whole, which I ultimately decided against doing, so I needed something lightweight and not too much gear for one person to carry about.

Because it is all one piece, it is neither a single wall tent nor a genuine double wall tent.

I really loved that it had that extra layer of protection, whether it was my gear inside contacting against the wall of the net or my gear outside touching against the wall of the net, because it kept everything off of the damp ceiling that may have been condensing all the way up and down.

Throughout the night, it just pours drips on your head.

It won’t totally keep the water off of you, but it will provide an additional layer of protection from the elements.

This seems to be one of the most straightforward tents to erect on the market.

In this particular tent, getting a proper pitch has proven to be rather challenging.

I’m quite ok with simply setting it up and sleeping in it on a few occasions, if not the most of the time.

You may take it with a grain of salt, to be honest with you.

To set it up, you just stake it down very loosely, insert two pulls into the stakes, and you’re pretty much done with the setup.

Number one, I believe, is that it is really quick and simple to set up.

It’s not a big deal at all.

There are no extra poles on this model.

Even if your roof height is slightly off during the night, you may make tiny changes to your roof height from the comfort of your quilt or sleeping bag to help out a little bit.

This is the third chamber, which is enormously large, if a mouse is truly serious about getting in through a wall and inside their house.

As a matter of fact, I don’t even need to place anything under the vestibules anymore since I have so much space beside me in the tent right now with the head and foot room that it isn’t really ample.

Andy is someone I know from the Shield Brothers Outdoors.

Following the setup of the primary bug-net component of your tent, there is no need to worry about putting on the fly.

You always have your rain fly attached, so there’s never a problem.

With a single wall tent, you won’t be able to achieve that.

It provides amazing wind protection, the vestibules hug fairly low to the ground.

For me, the opportunity to wake up with a mountain view is essential, as is the availability of an open meadow with a camping spot.

Although you can’t see it in the picture, it makes it very quick to put up, which is great in and of itself.

I’ve actually used that to hang damp socks on in the past.

If I wake up in this tent at any point in the night, no matter which way I turn, I can reach up to the middle of the roof and press the Indiglo button to see exactly what time it is and what the temperature is, among other things.

Because I want to view what I’m reading off of my screen, it’s quite convenient for me, and the final pro that I’ll highlight is its distinctiveness.

It’s always a source of conversation and discussion.

The purple is particularly popular; nevertheless, the first time I saw these tents, I detested the color purple.

The more I thought about it, the more I wanted the purple one over any other color.

However, there are some reservations.

I wouldn’t alter anything because I don’t create tents, and I’m not sure how you would modify them, but there are certain aspects that make it a little more challenging.

Generally speaking, any small nylon tent will collect water due to the fact that it is porous and does not react well to temperature and humidity fluctuations.

Notice how this Ridgeline is positioned somewhat lower than the rest of the vehicle’s body?

As a result of being shorter, this tank will work out better for you since you’ll have more room to scoot around in the middle.

It’s actually not that big of a deal; it’s just something to keep in mind for future reference.

If that’s what you’re searching for, you’ve found it.

However, there have been occasions when I’ve attempted to make it appear a little prettier and a little tighter, and I’ve come up short on both counts.

It’s imperative that you find the right partner.

I’ve become a lot better at it to the point where it looks quite decent when I set it up, but I’m not saying that we’re experts at it.

To make everything look perfect, here’s something else: I’m talking about how little they are from the end of the tent to the end of the vestibule, which according to the website is only eight inches.

It states that the distance between the end of the tent and the vestibule is 16 inches on both sides, and when I first got the tent, I was reading through the manual and noticed that it was labeled with a completely different diagram than what I had been informed of.

So I really wrote Judy from my light rough year, and she responded promptly and graciously.

I could send this back in for the same price as I originally paid.

The awning version, which is nearly identical to the standard version except for the fact that it has an awning pool and, more importantly, an awning that can be broken down and put into a standard storm mode configuration.

I chose not to do so simply because I loved the tent and since it had a lot of space on the interior.

I will never, ever leave a backpack or anything else outside here.

However, because they are so small, this does create some difficulties.

This happened because of the drooping of the sill nylon.

That’s not to say that I didn’t place them both on the same side; in fact, I often put one shoe over here and another over here exactly at the high spots, because any further back you go or if you put anything in that’s tall, it’s simply going to be touching the tarp and absorbing wet from the tarp.

  1. One other thing: it’s a little aggravating in this tent, and I’ll say this is the worst quality of this tent, trying to unzip the rain fly from the inside of the tent is the worst quality of this tent.
  2. Otherwise, you’ll have to reach out with both arms and sort of pull the slack down on this side while also pulling your zipper up, which, if you’re paying attention, will put your head right in the middle of all the moisture.
  3. It doesn’t bother me anymore when I’m at them, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s a little unpleasant at times.
  4. Here’s one I’m willing to bet you’ve never heard before in this tent.
  5. The tarp is sealed to the bug net, and if you look closely, you’ll notice that it doesn’t just roll up 3/4 of the way.
  6. When I notice anything like a spider or whatever, I’ll generally be inside the tent, attempting to flick it down so that I can scoop it up and take it outside.
  7. I’ve literally never checked to see whether there’s a bunch of insect guts up there.

Well, that’s pretty much it for the cons of this tent; like I mentioned, there are a lot of them in detail, and they really don’t bother me at all, since I really enjoy this tent and for what I want in a tent, which is lightweight and quick to put up, this tent is perfect.

So, all in all, I am completely satisfied with it.

Not a drop of water found its way into me or any of my sleeping gear.

With this particular item, I believe the advantages outweigh the disadvantages.

Today there are a lot of, I want to say, various possibilities out.

I believe it is a truly innovative design for light heart equipment.

I would absolutely consider purchasing another tent from them in the future; in fact, I am now on the market for a two-person tent.

The colors are fantastic.

You can purchase them in a gray hue with a purple floor in this location, and I believe blue is the other color available.

There is no doubt that it is a basic shelter; it is not very spacious.

Even with two people in this tent to congregate and hang out, there isn’t enough headroom, so it’s best for one person who wants to sleep comfortably on long days on the trail.

I’m just really, really pleased with it overall.

Consequently, if you have any questions or comments concerning it, please post them in the comments section below.

One thing I will say is that, as a YouTube filmer, the purple has made it a little more difficult for me to film my intended content.

Having realized that, I might have acquired a better hue by reducing my consumption, but honestly, I wouldn’t do that merely because this is so delicious.

I could probably speak about this device for the rest of my life, and it is, indeed, an excellent piece of equipment.

As a get hit like me, I get thrilled about the prospect of utilizing it, and you know that’s the point of being hit in the first place, aside from enjoying the great outdoors.

Thank you for reading, and we’ll see you on the next installment.

I know I keep bringing up Spunks, but I really like these pumpkin seeds, and you should give them a try as well! They are just fantastic for camping and other enjoyable activities. The video below provides a brief glimpse into the production facility where Spunks are manufactured.

Lightheart Gear Solo Awning First Look Review by Mark Verber

Single-piece heart-gear with a light feel to it. Since I’ve been using this tent for about fifteen or sixteen nights, I’ve been asked to write a full-on comprehensive, well, kind of comprehensive review of it. I’m going to do exactly that. The question of whether or not I would recommend this to other people comes up frequently in the comments section of my blog posts, and so we’ll go over all of the details together. All of the things about this tent that I don’t particularly care for are also things that I really like.

  1. Alright.
  2. First, a quick run-down of the tent’s specifications.
  3. 27 ounces are the weight of the item.
  4. It does not, in fact, have ten poles as some believe.
  5. Although that was an option I chose to go ahead and have them do it because I didn’t want to mess with it, we’ll get into the benefits and drawbacks of each option later on.
  6. I don’t want them to feel bad about themselves.
  7. I was actually in the planning stages of doing the Appalachian Trail in its entirety, which I ultimately decided against doing, so I wanted something lightweight and not too much gear for one person to carry around with them.

Because it is all one piece, it is neither a single wall tent nor a true double wall tent.

I really liked that it had that extra layer of protection, whether it was my gear inside touching against the wall of the net or my gear outside touching against the wall of the net, because it kept everything off of the wet ceiling that might have been condensing the whole way up and down.

For the rest of the night, it just rains drops on your head.

It won’t completely keep the water off of you, but it will provide an additional layer of protection from the elements.

On the surface, this appeared to be one of the most straightforward tents to put together on the market.

In this particular tent, getting a perfect pitch has proven to be extremely challenging.

I’m perfectly content with simply setting it up and sleeping in it on a few occasions, and I mean on the majority of occasions.

You can take that with a grain of salt, to be honest with yourself.

To set it up, you simply stake it down very loosely, insert two pulls into the stakes, and you’re pretty much done with your setup.

My favorite is that it is extremely quick and simple to set up.

The procedure is completely painless.

There are no additional poles on this model, unfortunately.

Even if your roof height is slightly off during the night, you can make minor adjustments to your roof height from the comfort of your quilt or sleeping bag to alleviate the sagging a little bit.

This is the third room, which is insanely large, if a mouse is really serious about getting in through a wall and getting to them there.

I don’t even need to put anything under the vestibules anymore because I have so much space beside me in the tent right now, with the head and feet room, that it’s not exactly generous in terms of space.

Shield Brothers Outdoors introduced me to Andy.

You won’t have to worry about putting the fly on your tent after you’ve already set up the main bug-net portion of it.

The fact that you always have your rain fly attached means that it’s never an issue, and it’s actually quite convenient because you can roll up the vestibules and have full open mesh.

The bug net also serves as a vapor barrier, which as I previously stated is a major reason why I purchased this particular tent.

The fact that you can roll these vestibules up and your head is within inches of the ground is seven.

The stunning mountain view was undoubtedly a major selling point for me when comparing this tent to the many other single walled tents that I had considered before purchasing it.

Especially for high-elevation campsites, such as where I’m currently camped, another advantage of this tent is the ridge pool.

On more than one occasion, I’ve used that hook to dry wet socks.

See also:  Google How Much Weight Will A Pop-Up Tent Bed Hold

For me, every single night, when I lay down, I hang my read right from the top of that pool right there, and at any given point in time, no matter which way I wake up in this tent, I can reach right up to the middle of the Roof and hit that Indiglo button to see exactly what time it is, what the temperature is, or whatever else I want to know.

  1. A tent that looks like this is rare to find in the world of tents.
  2. A lot of people seem to like it when they see me setting it up on the trail.
  3. My first impression of it was that it looked terrible, but I kept coming back to it in my search for an ultra light, one-person tent, and the more I came back to it, the less I thought it looked terrible.
  4. In any case, I adore the color of this tent and despise the idea of disparaging it.
  5. It is true that there are some things that I am unable to disclose.
  6. I know some of these are nitpicking, but I’m going to list all of the things that I believe are two standards up to speed on this tent number one sagging that I believe are two standards are up to speed on this tent.
  7. Certainly, a heavy downpour over night will accomplish this, especially if the temperatures fluctuate widely, but this thing will be very soggy in the morning.

It can get a little too close to your face at certain points.

However, because nylon is a synthetic material, you’ll have to take it out and retighten it after you’ve done that.

The only con is that it is a little difficult to get a perfect pitch, despite the fact that it is super super easy and quick to set up this thing.

Normally, I just set it up and let it run on its own, which is perfectly satisfactory for me.

Because the ground must be completely level, it is a combination of how high your pulls are and how tight it is across the length, as well as across the width of the ground.

Although I’ve improved to the point where it looks pretty good every time I set it up, I’m not sure we’re particularly skilled at doing so.

The vestibules of this tent are not great, which means they are pretty much a snooze fest.

Actually, the measurements for this tent are incorrect.

Consequently, I actually emailed Judy from a light difficult year, and she was wonderful to communicate with.

Alternatively, I could return it for the same cost.

This version has an awning pool and, of course, an awning that can be dismantled and put into a normal storm mode configuration.

That being said, you are aware that it would provide you with the additional vestibule space that I was seeking.

Vestibules aren’t necessary for me.

Given that my vestibules are so little, the only thing I ever put beneath them is my shoes and backpack.

Last time I was out and it rained pretty much all night, my vestibule sucked in a little bit due to the drooping of the sill nylon, allowing one of my shoes to come into contact with the ground.

But that’s kind of stupid, because I had them both on the same side.

One other thing: it’s a little aggravating in this tent, and I’ll say this is the worst quality of this tent, trying to unzip the rain fly from the inside of the tent is the most aggravating quality of this tent.

It is necessary to draw your zipper up if you do not want to stretch out with both arms and pull the slack down on this side.

This has become routine for me because it is directly into the side of the tent.

For the time being, you’ll have to bury your face against the wall in order to reach out here and grab your zipper.

Every inch of the ridgeline, as well as the front and rear, is covered with a bug, trap.

Because this is on the rear, any bug that climbs up here in the middle of the night is pretty much impossible to get out without reaching up and taking it out in this manner.

In any other case, I simply put my hand up into the tent and brush them out as quickly as I can, but it is a nuisance, and if you don’t pay attention, whether or not there are bugs you are aware of up in there, you’re going to roll your tent up and you’re just going to be wet and miserable.

Often, if I see one, I’ll get it out – and I have no problem with this – but if you’re in a very bug-infested region, it’s absolutely something to consider because wow, it could be a big disaster if you don’t get your bugs out of there on a consistent basis.

When I’m in a hurry to get things set up, it does a fantastic job.

Having having it out in the rain multiple times, I’ve never had an issue with moisture seeping inside.

After all, that’s what counts at the end of the day (or should I say first thing in the morning) as I already stated, all of the downsides are simply little quibbles.

In the realm of backpacking, this is not a tent that is widely used.

Even while lighter tents are more common, I believe that this one is truly unique in its design and construction.

From my perspective, it gets two thumbs up.

When my wife and I go, I’ve been wanting to go for a long time, and the duo from Lake art gear both seemed like very nice possibilities for half the money that you’d pay going to a z-pack, duplex, or anything like, so it’s definitely a budget-friendly alternative.

Colors such as camo and purple are available.

In other words, you have a few options.

As far as Headroom is concerned, you can sit right in the middle of the tent and still have enough of headroom, but there isn’t a lot of room to move around.

Generally speaking, I’m really pleased with it, albeit there are several aspects of it that I would like to improve.

I’ll do all I can to get to them as soon as I possibly can.” In one way, the purple has limited my ability to shoot on YouTube, which is unfortunate because I am a YouTuber.

Having understood that, I might have achieved a better hue by reducing my consumption, but honestly, I wouldn’t do it merely for the sake of looking good.

Thank you very much for reading.

It’s an amazing piece of equipment.

As a get hit like me, I get thrilled at the prospect of utilizing it, and you know that’s the point of being hit in the first place, aside from getting to enjoy the great outdoors.

Spunks is one of my favorite foods and I’m sure you’ll like these pumpkin seeds as much as I did. In addition to camping and other enjoyable activities, they are also excellent for fishing. An inside peek at the business where Spunks are created may be found in the video below.

Item

Lightheart Gear Solo Awning is the item under review (Sil Nylon) The weight that is listed is: The following is the weight when it was delivered: MSRP: A prototype of the Lightheart Gear Solo Awning provided me with the opportunity to learn more. After much deliberation, Judy generously sent me one of her first prototypes because I was debating whether to purchase a Solo Cuben Awning with just the awning (which is projected to weigh around 14oz!) or one with a second door and a zipper in the back fly.

The topic of whether you could go in and out of the awning while it was fastened down raised some eyebrows.

Judy urged me to talk about my experiences with the prototype, with the proviso that it was a prototype that had not been finalized to her usual high standards.

I devoted all of my attention to the design.

Summary

Let me begin by stating that this is the first time in around 8 years that I have utilized a double walled shelter for protection. I had forgotten how pleasant it might be. I didn’t have to pay attention to my movements all the time or keep away from the walls. This would be THE shelter I would choose for three-season adventures, especially if the weather forecast called for a combination of rain, bugs, bright days, and mild breezes. The Lightheart Solo Awning is especially well-suited for use on the Appalachian Trail and other woodland trails.

  1. It is in these types of environments that I would not feel comfortable using the Lightheart Solo without anything to prevent the spreader pole from spinning in severe winds, which may cause the tent to collapse.
  2. It is possible that the velco will fix the issues I saw, but I cannot tell for certain because I have not tested Judy’s shelter when it was equipped with the velco in really high winds.
  3. During pleasant weather, the fly could be easily rolled back, allowing for nearly 360-degree views while still maintaining a very pleasant, bug-free environment.
  4. It was easier to get in and out of the tent with the awning up, and I had more space to prepare food with it open on the inside.

Even better is to do nothing at all. I still had an almost 180-degree view of the surrounding area from the shelter. Wow, that was very good. It was a pleasure to stay at this shelter.

Description

For a more detailed description, please visit the Lightheart Gear website. When I have more time, I will update this page with further information. One thing to keep in mind is that, because of its diamond form, it is very lengthy for a solitary shelter.

Conditions

It was only in my backyard that the shelter was used. It arrived just as a storm was about to blow in. On one day, the shelter had nearly constant rain, while another witnessed winds that were consistently over 15 miles per hour, with gusts reaching 35 miles per hour. My guess is that the gusts were much greater than that because I didn’t bring out my windspeed meter until the wind had already died down.] There were a number of more days with varying weather conditions. Several nights in a row, the temperature plummeted below dew point.

Performance

Simple and easy set-up for the most part. I should be able to put it together in under two minutes. The majority of that time was spent inside the shelter when I was putting the poles in place. This was particularly welcome when confronted with a chilly rain. You should stake out the four corners and then set up your poles. After that, you may remove the two side corner stakes and use them for the fly, according to the instructions. With and without the stakes in the side corners, I tried staking the tent and with and without the stakes in the fly, as well as leaving the stakes in and transferring them to the fly.

  1. Even though it is possible to set up the shelters with the poles fully extended, I found the process to be quite difficult, and I was constantly worried that the poles might slide out of my grasp and poke a hole in the tent roof.
  2. One thing that I discovered is that it is fairly obvious when the pole is the correct length, so if your pole does not have a length marking on it, you should be OK without one.
  3. This is made rather simple with the Solo Awning.
  4. The awning can be set up with a pole, fastened to a tree, or thrown down to protect from the elements (more on this later).
  5. Getting a pitch that is worthy of a storm is a little more difficult.
  6. Above that, you’ll want to make sure that all of the side pullouts are securely fastened.
  7. I feel that the shape of the shelter will continue to be an issue, despite the fact that this is a prototype, and that portion of the cloth flap may go.

Several times, the shelter came crashing down due to high winds.

The winds were severe and constantly altering in each occasion.

Because to the excessive rotation, the tent collapsed when the poles pulled out.

Nothing within the shelter was harmed by the rain.

A method of attaching the spreader pole to the top of the tent to prevent it from rotating, such as multiple loops or much better a sleeve, would significantly lower the chance of collapse, but I predict a strong enough wind to overcome even that.

I had not heard of anybody else experiencing a collapse, so I began to question whether I was doing anything incorrectly.

Judy’s single shelters were among those that received an email from me, and I inquired as to if they had any insight into what I was doing incorrectly.

A couple of them pointed out that I shouldn’t be shocked because the great majority of ultralights have problems with strong winds, and that I should consider using a pyramid (which is what I use in extremely awful weather) if I was anticipating really nasty conditions.

They did notice some rotation of the spreader pole, but not to the point where it failed.

With the double-wall construction, there was no condensation to worry about.

[ Tightening up the shelter may typically be accomplished by increasing the length of your poles, which eliminates the need to evacuate the shelter as SilNylon expands.

When I woke up the next morning, I discovered that the shell of my bag had become somewhat moist, but not to the point where it was causing any problems.

I was concerned that wind-driven rain would seep inside the house.

No guarantee that it will not happen to you, but the wind was blowing at a steady 20mph with significantly greater gusts at the time of this writing.

It would be more difficult to get into and out of the lockdown pitch if the additional pullouts on the awning were staked down, making entry and exit more difficult.

As a result, if I were to acquire the shelter, I would have chosen the lowest weight option available, which would have been the Cuben Solo Awning with a single entrance, albeit the second door is rather convenient.

Durability

There is no prior experience.

Compared To

Six Moon Designs are shown on this page. Skyscrape X is a kind of skyscraper (and cheaper models made from SilNylon or Polyester). This is a shelter with which I have no firsthand experience. The design is very similar. The Lightheart Solo is a bit smaller and lighter than the Lightheart Solo. From the standpoint of a living room, I want the peak to be a little closer to the head than the foot, but photographs make it appear as though it falls down a little too near to the feet (I tend to move my feet a lot at night).

  • The ZPacks Hexamid (see my review) in its most basic configuration is anticipated to weigh between 65 and 75 percent of the weight of the single door Lightheart Gear Cuben Awning Tent (see my review) (final weight not settled yet).
  • If you include the optional door and/or bivy, the weight of the Hexamid Awning can rise to a level that is comparable to the weight of the Cuben Solo Awning.
  • That said, the internal space of the Solo Awning feels significantly larger, and you don’t have to be as careful about brushing up against the walls as you do with the Hexamid.
  • The Lightheart Solo Awning is significantly easier to enter and depart than other awnings.
  • The Lightheart Gear Solo Awning is smaller and lighter than the competition, and it provides a more comfortable platform for managing camp life in the rain.
  • The Solo/Duo Mid is far more capable of withstanding heavy winds and snow.
  • The One and Only: With the Lightheart Solo Awning, it was a little simpler to pitch correctly because of the difficulty in getting the back pole on The One to be properly aligned.
  • I discovered that The One was more resistant to wind than Lightheart Solo.

Other Good Reviews

LightheartSolo Thread is now active at Whiteblaze. BackpackingLight.com has a Lightheart Solo Thread that you may purchase.

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