Where Can We Camp In A Tent In The Woods

Tents & Shelters

Because your tent or shelter is likely the most crucial piece of equipment in your outdoor armory, as well as the one you’ll use the most often, do your homework and make a sensible choice when purchasing one. Whatever your location, whether you’re deep in the wilderness or camped out in your garden, a high-quality tent or shelter will transform the great outdoors into your second or third home. Simply said, the tent serves as the culmination of the outdoor experience. It protects your equipment, food and water, clothing, as well as you and your friends from the weather, and it serves as a base of operations.

Any location, whether the ramparts of Mt.

As a side note, our crew was responsible for outfitting the first expedition to top Mt.

Logan Mountain is the tallest mountain in Canada and the second-highest peak on the continent of North America.

  1. Everest (8,849 m/29,032 ft), which took place in Nepal.
  2. You’ll probably want to go for a lightweight, portable pop-up tent if you’re camping with your family in a front-country location.
  3. If you’re going camping with a large group of people, you may want to consider purchasing an economical ten-person tent to ensure that your entire party stays together while camping.
  4. We have everything from huge family camping tents to picnic awnings to lightweight, minimalist camping shelters that are suitable for duos or solitary campers with their gear.
  5. Heavy-duty dome tents that are suitable for more serious journeys, economical pop-up tents for backyard excursions, lightweight three-season tents, festival t-shirts, old-school A-frames, cabin tents, and more are all available at Camping World.

Tent Camping In The Woods Near Lake, Camp Blackbird, PA: 99 Hipcamper Reviews And 145 Photos

Camp Blackbird has self-certified that the Hipcamp COVID-19 Safety Standards have been applied at this location, which is in accordance with Hipcamp policy. Take a look at what’s being done here. We’ve closed our doors for the season. Take pleasure in hibernating in your bear cave. Campsite1 is a tent site near a lake that is surrounded by woodlands and can accommodate up to 6 people. Unlimited firewood is provided, as well as everything you need to build a campfire. In addition to the picnic table, there are benches surrounding the campfire.

  1. This campground is perfect for those who want to enjoy a peaceful camping experience.
  2. Campsite1, a tent site surrounded by woods with a partial view of the 949-acre lake, is available for rent.
  3. There are miles of hiking trails around for you to explore from your location.
  4. During the day, you may be able to hear people on the lake from your site, but it is otherwise a tranquil location.
  5. In addition to being surrounded by gorgeous scenery, we are conveniently placed near a variety of intriguing attractions.
  6. Parties and gatherings are not permitted on the site.
  7. Ideal for those who want to disconnect from the outside world and get one with nature.

The objective of the host is to cause the least amount of disruption to animals and its habitats as possible.

It is the earth on which you will be erecting your tent, thus it will not be precisely smooth or free of stones.

Some campers in the past have slept in their cars in the parking lot.

Pets are welcome at our facility.

Camping with your dog is quite enjoyable!

We, the hosts, reside on the property, which is around 900 feet away from the campground.

PLEASE NOTE: There will be no parties or unregistered visitors allowed on the site. People who wish to have a good time might find additional campgrounds in the region that are perfect for them.

Tent Camping In The Woods, Camp Dubonett, MI: 103 Hipcamper Reviews And 123 Photos

Tim has self-certified that Hipcamp’s COVID-19 Safety Standards have been applied at this listing, which he has done by signing the document below. Take a look at what’s being done here. MICHIGAN HIPCAMP’S #1 LOCATION IN 2020 AND 2021 VOTED BY CAMPERS! Camp Dubonett is a brand-new hidden gem in the woods that you must see! A tent camping spot hidden amid pine, birch, and oak trees on a 16-acre horse farm ensures that your friends and family (furry or otherwise*) will enjoy the great outdoors to the fullest!

  1. Campfires are permitted.
  2. Fires may be enjoyed around the group campfire.
  3. You will be surrounded by trees, leaves, and a variety of other combustible materials found in the natural environment.
  4. Make sure you’re not in a fire.
  5. There is a toilet accessible.
  6. We have two restrooms available for your use.
  7. Even while property management will clean the facilities on a regular basis, it is our collective responsibility to keep everyone healthy and happy!

On a leashWell-behaved, friendly dogs are permitted, but they must be accompanied by a human at all times while on the premises.

There are no other animals allowed unless they are licensed service animals.

On our farm, one of the most essential things to consider is the safety of all of the animals.

Tap the faucet.

If you want softened water, we will be pleased to provide you with some from within the home.

Given our efforts toward reducing the consumption of single-use water bottles, we are delighted to assist wherever possible.

Water that is hot There is just one shower accessible at this time.

Even while property management will clean the facilities on a regular basis, it is our collective responsibility to keep everyone healthy and happy!

Bins for recycling and garbage Located near the barn are garbage, recycling, and bottle deposit boxes for your convenience.

Please adhere to the “Leave No Trace” principle. As a result, if you bring something to the campgrounds, we expect it to either be taken with you or disposed of in our trash containers. Garbage, recycling, and returnable containers may be found on the second floor of the horse stable.

  • The check-in time is after 2 p.m., and the check-out time is before 12 p.m. Cancellation policy: Strictly enforced
  • Upon arrival, there will be a meet & greet. Two nights are required as a bare minimum. Bookings accepted up to 15 months in advance

You know what would make this trip even better?Take advantage of these offers available to add to your trip to Tent Camping In The Woods

Offered on the host’s property or in the surrounding area.

Biking

Immediately behind our home are many miles of well-maintained biking trails with a variety of obstacles.

Boating

Bring your own boat or rent one if you want to go fishing. Any and all sports Just 4 miles away, you’ll find yourself at Long Lake. Small boats, canoes, and kayaks are permitted on Lake Dubonnet. Read moreBoatingYou are welcome to bring your own boat or hire one from us. Any and all sports Just 4 miles away, you’ll find yourself at Long Lake. Small boats, canoes, and kayaks are permitted on Lake Dubonnet. Approximately 10 miles distant is a public boat launch on West Bay that is open to the public.

Fishing

The lake has shore fishing, which is accessible by a long walk, or you may drive over to the boat launch or beside the dam and fish from there. Continue readingFishing On Lake Dubonett, there is shore fishing available, although it is a lengthy walk, or you can just drive over to the boat launch or beside the dam and fish. There are also a number of smaller lakes in the surrounding region that provide dock or shore fishing opportunities.

Hiking

We have many miles of hiking trails just behind the farm that you may use. However, there are various hiking paths across the area, including inclines and descents. More information may be found here. Hiking We have many miles of hiking trails just behind the farm that you may use. The Sleeping Beat Dunes, which are around 20-40 minutes away, are among the several hiking paths in the surrounding region.

Paddling

Bring your canoes or kayaks if you want to participate. There are several lakes and rivers in the area where you may go for a quick paddle or spend the entire day. Continue reading Paddling Bring your canoes or kayaks if you want to participate. There are several lakes and rivers in the area where you can go for a quick paddle or spend the entire day on the water!

Off-roading (OHV)

Behind our property is a network of two-track roads that stretches for several kilometres.

Terrain

Tent Camping In The Woods is a campground in Michigan that has a lot of natural characteristics.

Lake

Walking through the woods will take you to Lake Dubonnett. Because it is a component of the state parks, a state park pass is necessary if you plan to drive there. More information may be found here. LakeDubonnett is a short walk through the woods from the campground. Because it is a component of the state parks, a state park pass is necessary if you plan to drive there. It is legal to use small motor boats such as canoes and kayaks. There are a number of islands to be discovered. I really request that you do not disturb the island with the BALD EAGLES NESTING!

The 24 Most Scenic Places to Camp in the United States

NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: While travel may be difficult right now, you may utilize our inspiring trip ideas to help you plan ahead for your next bucket list excursion. Take a road journey from coast to coast, and you’ll discover breathtaking vistas in every state in the United States of America. It’s possible that you’re asking, “Where are the greatest locations to camp around me?” One of the most enjoyable aspects of traveling around the United States is the abundance of wonderful camping opportunities.

This beautiful wilderness offers not only many opportunities for camping, but also picnicking, hiking paths, fishing, swimming, and other activities for those who want to get out of the city and appreciate nature.

While many of these parks have distinct, built-up camping grounds to choose from, many of which have running water and electricity for RV parking (which is ideal for road trips), more experienced outdoor enthusiasts can also find plenty of locations for backcountry camping where they can really rough it in the wilderness.

As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, certain campgrounds are now closed or limited capacity, so be careful to check their websites before you plan your vacation.

Acadia National Park, Maine

Acadia National Park is located in Maine.

White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire and Maine

Located in New Hampshire, the White Mountain National Forest Photograph courtesy of Cappi Thompson/Getty Images If you’re searching for a challenging walk, look no farther than the Appalachian Valley’s most northernmost region. During the autumn season, when leaf-peeping season is at its best, the vistas are exceptionally beautiful. In addition, there are various campgrounds with a combined total of hundreds of campsites in the forest. Several campsites, climbing locations, and shelters are now closed due to inclement weather.

Minnewaska State Park Reserve, New York

Minnewaska State Park Reserve is located in the state of New York. Photograph courtesy of andykazie/Getty Images In the Shawangunk Ridge region, less than 94 miles outside of New York City, this state park preserve sits at an elevation of more than 2,000 feet above sea level and is surrounded by rugged terrain. The views are spectacular, and there’s plenty of space to hike or bike around. The park is currently operating at a reduced capacity, and some facilities are closed for the time being — the adjacent campground is also closed for the time being.

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

Shenandoah National Park is located in Virginia. Image courtesy of Xavier Ascanio/Getty Images Located a short drive from Washington D.C., Shenandoah National Park boasts more than 500 miles of hiking trails, including an eight-mile climb up Old Rag Mountain, which is a must-do for serious hikers. This magnificent park offers plenty of beautiful views of the forest and waterfalls to enjoy. Its amenities are open during the spring, summer, and fall seasons, and it offers a choice of five campsites to accommodate visitors.

Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

Camping in Assateague Island State Park (Maryland) Image courtesy of sdominick/Getty Images Located only nine miles south of Ocean City on Assateague Island are 37 miles of beaches where you may camp and enjoy water sports including as swimming, surfing, stand-up paddleboarding, crabbing, bicycling, and kayaking, as well as viewing wild horses. Other campgrounds at Assateague Island National Seashore reopened on June 15, although group campgrounds and some facilities remain closed as of this writing.

Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

Dry Tortugas National Park is located in Florida. Image courtesy of sly5800/Getty Images In this magnificent area, you may camp right next to one of the world’s largest barrier reefs, which is directly outside your tent. Renting snorkeling equipment and spending the day at the beach or seeing Fort Jefferson are two options for campers. Make sure to bring a pair of binoculars with you if you want to go bird-watching in this region. Despite the fact that the campsite is now open, tours of the fort and ranger-led activities have been temporarily discontinued.

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Big Bend National Park, Texas

Big Bend National Park is located in Texas. Image courtesy of Barcroft Media/Getty Images For anyone searching for a terrific area to go rafting, canoeing, or kayaking, Big Bend National Park along the Rio Grande is a fantastic destination to check out. In addition, there are hiking and backpacking paths across the park’s desert, mountain, and river vistas to explore.

There are three constructed campsites as well as backcountry camping available in the area. Current operations include a campsite with decreased capacity that is operational, but all other amenities, including tourist centers, are closed.

Ozark National Forest, Arkansas

Ozark National Forest in Arkansas is a national forest that protects a large area of land. Photograph courtesy of Michael Runkel/Getty Images Arkansas boasts a plethora of rural areas that are sometimes ignored. There are nine beaches, thousands of acres of lakes and streams, and 400 miles of hiking trails to explore in this area. A number of constructed parks for RV and tent camping are available to campers to select from. There are still a number of campsites and recreational places that remain closed, although others have reopened with conditions.

Badlands National Park, South Dakota

South Dakota’s Badlands National Park is a must-see. Photograph courtesy of Karen Desjardin/Getty Images Don’t be fooled by the Badlands’ breathtaking beauty. Even if the weather is harsh, the scenery is still breathtaking. In addition to the numerous rock formations you’ll discover there, you’ll also find prairies and locations where you may look for old fossils. There are two campgrounds to choose from: Cedar Pass (which has facilities like as running water, electricity, and other amenities), and Sage Creek (which does not have running water but where you may frequently observe bison roaming about).

Sawtooth National Forest, Idaho

Idaho’s Sawtooth National Forest is a beautiful place to hike and camp. Image courtesy of Buddy Mays/Getty Images The rugged Smoky Mountains provide breathtaking views that seem like something out of a Bob Ross painting. There are many of campgrounds on this national forest’s grounds, but Sawtooth National Recreation Area is one of the most scenic locations. Some recreational areas have reopened; however, some remain closed; see this map for more information.

Glacier National Park, Montana

Idaho’s Sawtooth National Forest is a beautiful place to hike and camp in the wilderness. Photograph courtesy of Buddy Mays/Getty Images. Mountain scenery that looks like something out of a Bob Ross painting may be seen in the steep Smoky Mountains. Sawtooth National Recreation Area is one of the greatest places to camp in this national forest, and it is one of the most popular areas in the area. Many outdoor recreation areas have reopened; however, some are still closed; view this map to find out which ones.

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park is a must-see. Photograph courtesy of Jeff Diener/Getty Images Near Jackson Hole, you may get a glimpse of the Rocky Mountains while also taking in the abundant animals and lakes. Also nearby is the National Elk Refuge, where depending on the time of year you visit, you can see hundreds of elk, depending on where you are. In Grand Teton National Park, you may choose from six campgrounds, with Signal Mountain campground in particular receiving the most positive reviews.

Other facilities, including the Jenny Lake Visitor Center, exhibits, and a few other venues, are temporarily closed, however the campgrounds are currently open and most facilities are open with limits.

Gunnison National Forest, Colorado

It is located in the Gunnison National Forest in Colorado. Photograph courtesy of J.C. Leacock/Getty Images A spectacular view of the Rocky Mountains is assured here, thanks to the 3,000 miles of trails and 1.6 million acres of public property that make up the area. With its 30 campsites, Gunnison also provides a diverse range of environments, including campsites on wide meadows, in evergreen woods, in mountains, and directly by the lakes. Some campers and amenities are now closed, while others are open but with restricted capacity – you can find a complete list of open campgrounds on the Gunnison National Forest website, which also includes a list of closed campgrounds.

Arches National Park, Utah

Arches National Park is located in Utah. Photograph courtesy of Marc Shandro/Getty Images When you wake up on a frigid morning and find fresh, white snow falling against the red cliffs of Arches National Park, there is nothing quite like it. The Delicate Arch Trail, one of the most popular paths in the area, takes you on a fantastic journey with plenty of photo possibilities. There is just one campground in the park, The Devils Garden, which offers 50 campsites, however there are other camping options in the surrounding region, including Moab.

Arch Rock Campground, Nevada

Arch Rock Campground is located in Nevada’s Valley of Fire State Park. Photograph courtesy of Cornelia Doerr/Getty Images Arch Rock Campsite, located in the Valley of Fire State Park, is a tranquil campground surrounded by stunning red sandstone formations. It is just 55 miles from Las Vegas. The park is now open, and the two campsites are also open, but with a limited number of spaces available.

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Arizona’s Grand Canyon National Park is a must-see. Photograph courtesy of Michael Melford/Getty Images If you’re looking for a breathtaking vista, there’s no better place to go than the Grand Canyon. During the summer months, reservations are strongly advised for two of the three built campsites. Camping in the backcountry is also permitted with a permission. While the South Rim is more accessible, it may become a little congested at times. If you’re looking for a more private location, the North Rim is a good option if you don’t mind traveling a little further to get there.

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

Carlsbad Caverns National Park is located in the state of New Mexico. Photograph courtesy of CrackerClips/Getty Images Full moon walks are held in Carlsbad Caverns National Park, where park rangers are on hand to answer questions about the nocturnal critters that inhabit the region, local legend, and astronomy. Also, in the late summer and early fall, the caverns are an excellent area to see bats, which may be found in large numbers. However, inexperienced campers should be aware that there is only backcountry camping available and that all campers must have a permit.

The bat flight programs have been temporarily halted owing to worries about social separation, but the tunnels have reopened with additional safety procedures in effect.

Olympic National Park, Washington

Olympic National Park is located in Washington. Photograph courtesy of Jordan Siemens/Getty Images There’s nothing quite like camping right next to this stunning coastline, which is distinguished by a number of sea stacks. Olympic National Park includes 14 separate campgrounds, some of which are very near to the beach and others which are in the rain forest, allowing you to see a range of sceneries in one place. The park is preparing for a gradual reopening, and campsites and visitor centers are closed during this time.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

Crater Lake National Park is located in Oregon. Photograph courtesy of Bruce Shippee / EyeEm/Getty Images This park is home to the deepest lake in the United States as well as a dormant volcano, providing lots of photographic opportunity for nature enthusiasts. Campers can select between the Mazama campsite (for RV and tent camping) and the Lost Creek campground (for tent camping only). And, sure, there is backcountry camping available with a valid permit. Despite the fact that the park has reopened, the park’s information centers are now closed, and certain events have been canceled.

Joshua Tree National Park, California

California’s Joshua Tree National Park is a must-see. Photograph courtesy of Seth K. Hughes/Getty Images There are a variety of campgrounds in this area, including Jumbo Boulders Campground, which is well-known for its large boulder rocks that provide wind protection for campers’ sites. But you may also select from among the park’s more than 100 campsites spread throughout its 800,000 acres, which are all available on a first-come, first-serve basis right now. Campsites are still available in the park, but all scheduled programs have been canceled.

Yosemite National Park, California

Yosemite National Park is located in California. Image courtesy of Bee-individual/Getty Images Yosemite National Park is a must-see destination for anybody who enjoys the outdoors, and it’s highly recommended for those looking for a nice camping experience. Over 95% of the park is declared wilderness, and there are 13 popular campsites distributed throughout the park, as well as backcountry camping for those who wish to rough it in the woods. At this time, only the Upper Pines campsite is available, and visitors must make reservations in advance to enter the park, even for a day visit.

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California

California’s Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Photograph courtesy of Johnny Haglund/Getty Images Want to view some of the largest trees in North America? Look no farther than the Grand Canyon. Take a look at these national parks for inspiration. Choose from one of the 14 main campsites in Sequoia and Kings Canyon to set up your tent. When it comes to campsites, most of the time it is first come, first served.

However, this year, the parks are requiring campers to make reservations for the balance of the 2020 season when they reopen. These parks are now operational, but all of its services, including camping, are closed for the season.

Haleakala National Park, Hawaii

Hawaii’s Haleakala National Park is a must-see. Photograph courtesy of M Swiet Productions/Getty Images The most notable feature of this state’s national park is a dormant volcano that rises to a height of 10,023 feet and provides some of the greatest views of Hawaii’s natural beauty. When the campsites, visitor centers, and trails in the Kpahulu Area, the Summit Area, and the Wilderness Area reopen, you can choose to stay in one of these areas. However, these campgrounds, visitor centers, and trails are now closed.

Denali National Park, Alaska

Denali National Park is located in Alaska. Photograph courtesy of Brett Maurer/Getty Images If you’ve never gone to Alaska, you’re missing out on a wonderful experience. There is some of the most stunning landscape in the United States to be found there. Denali National Park has six million acres of territory where visitors may see animals, go along scenic paths, and witness a variety of flora, waterways, and mountains, including Mount McKinley, North America’s highest peak at 20,320 feet above sea level.

In order to accommodate visitors, the majority of campsites are planning to reopen this summer; specific dates may be found on the Denali National Park website.

Camp Map

When all of the normal campsites are full, many people stay in the overflow area. The overflow areas are devoid of any facilities such as electricity, water, sewage, shade, or a picnic table, among other things. If you need to charge your electronics, you may do so on our clubhouse terrace, which has outlets conveniently accessible. Our comfort stations are also near by, where you can use restrooms, hot showers, and basins to wash your utensils after a long day. Overflow does not have fire rings, although it is permitted to use an elevated fire dish.

  1. Potable water is accessible on the corner of our storage building, directly across from the flag poles, for individuals who are towing trailers.
  2. There are no boundaries around your website.
  3. Please do not leave your car in the overflow parking lot.
  4. In addition, because overflow sites are charged per person, they are the most cost-effective option for camping, especially if you are a single guest.
  5. Overflow sites are available indefinitely, although they are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis.

Primitive Camping

Learn more about backwoods camping and how to leave no trace while enjoying the great outdoors in this video. DEC’s official YouTube channel. When camping in a tent or lean-to deep in the woods, away from civilization, you are said to be doing primitive or backcountry camping. Running water, electricity, picnic tables, and bathrooms are among the minimal or non-existent facilities available at this form of camping.

Primitive camping also necessitates the transport of all of your equipment, food, clothes, toiletries, and sleeping gear (including a sleeping bag, tent, and pad) that you will require during your stay by backpacking or paddling it. On this page you will find:

  • Where to Set Up Camp
  • Rules and Guidelines for Primitive Camping on DEC Lands
  • How to Prepare for a Camping Trip
  • Selection of a camping location
  • Use of a lean-to shelter
  • And fire safety Suggestions for Leaving No Trace
  • There are some new rules for the Catskills and the Adirondacks.
  • Choosing a Camping Location
  • Complying with the New York State Firewood Regulations While Camping
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State Lands that Allow Primitive Camping

On several DEC-owned properties, such as Forest Preserve holdings in the Catskills and Adirondack Mountains, as well as on State Forest lands outside the Preserve, primitive camping is permitted. Primitive camping is not permitted on state lands, with the exception of Unique Areas, Wildlife Management Areas, and a few other types of state land. If you need information on a specific property, you may visit the DEC webpage for that property or contact a DEC Regional Office in the area where the land unit is located.

Where toSetUp Camp

Camping in authorized basic tent sites is the most convenient option. These locations are often flatter than other regions and have deeper, firmer soils that are more resistant to heavy use and erosion, hence reducing the negative effects of camping on the surrounding environment. Pit toilets and rock fire rings are available at a number of locations. Marker that says “Camp Here” Campers are invited to utilize the tent sites that have been set aside. They are frequently located along hiking routes and offer views of ponds, lakes, streams, and rivers.

All of the approved primitive tent sites are marked with “Camp Here” signs in yellow and black.

Rulesand Guidelines

Important: Please be aware that certain land units within the Forest Preserve may have restrictions that differ from the laws and standards outlined in the following section. For information on individual properties, please see our rules page or contact the Regional DEC Office in the region where you are interested in learning more.

CampsiteSelection

  • Primitive tent sites and lean-tos are provided on a first-come, first-served basis and are not available for reservation. No reservations are accepted. A tent site or lean-to that is unoccupied by persons or equipment is permitted to be used as a camping site. If you are not utilizing a certified primitive tent site, you must set up camp 150 feet from a water body, road, or path to be permitted to camp. Do not camp in locations where “Camping Prohibited” signs are placed. A permission from a Forest Ranger is required for camping for more than three nights or with a group of ten or more persons. The name and contact information for the area ranger may be obtained by calling 518-897-1300. Please adhere to all applicable State Land Camping and Hiking Regulations. Black bears may be seen in large numbers across the Adirondacks and Catskill Mountains. Bear-resistant food canisters or food hangs should be used to store all food, waste, and amenities for campers. When hiking in the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness, bear-resistant canisters are essential.

Lean -To Use

  • Tents are not permitted inside lean-tos, and they must be at least 150 feet away from the lean-to to be permitted. It is not possible to book a lean-to because they are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Sharing your tent site for one night with a second camper or group of campers that come after dark is good etiquette, especially when it is rainy, chilly, or windy, and it is recommended. The second group should pack up their belongings and leave in the morning to seek for a new site. Lean-tos should be shared by a number of individuals until they are completely filled (normally 8 people). These scenarios are unusual, although they can occur in extensively utilized regions such as the Eastern High Peaks Wilderness, which has a high volume of visitors.

FireSafety at Campsites

  • Michael Pantusco captured this image. Check out a brief video on how to make a safe campfire on DEC’s YouTube channel (this will take you away from the DEC website)
  • Fires should be constructed in existing fire pits or fireplaces, if such facilities are available. Do not start a fire in an area that has been designated with a “No Fires” disk. It is required that campfires be smaller than 3 feet in height and 4 feet in circumference. As a fuel, only charcoal or untreated wood can be used
  • Otherwise, Overhanging branches, steep slopes, dry leaves and grass, and rotting stumps or logs should all be avoided while building a campfire. Remove any rubbish, duff, and any other combustible debris from a 10-foot-diameter circle
  • Extra wood should be stacked away from the fire
  • It is not permitted to cut down any standing trees. For fires, only dead and down wood should be used
  • Pour water on all flames and stir ashes until they are cool to the touch. More information on limiting campfire impacts may be found on the DEC’s YouTube channel (this link takes you away from the DEC website).

Tips toLeaveNo Trace

  • Illegal removal of flora, rocks, fossils, or artifacts from state grounds is prohibited without a permission
  • Observe and enjoy wildlife and flora without interfering with them
  • Take what you bring in and put it to good use. Use the pit toilets that have been installed at popular camping spots and trailheads. If no other options are available, dig a hole 6-8 inches deep at least 150 feet away from water or campgrounds to dispose of human waste. Leaves and soil should be used to cover the area. View a how-to video on DEC’s YouTube channel (this will take you away from the DEC website)
  • Pet excrement should be collected and buried away from water, footpaths, and camping areas. Maintain control over your pet and keep it restrained on a leash when strangers approach
  • Check that you are at least 150 feet away from bodies of water such as rivers or lakes if you are going to use soap.

Additional Rules for theAdirondackand Catskill Preserves

  • Except in an emergency, camping is prohibited above an elevation of 4,000 feet in the Adirondacks
  • Between March 22 and December 20, camping is prohibited above an elevation of 3,500 feet in the Catskills
  • And between March 22 and December 20, camping is prohibited above an elevation of 4,000 feet in the Adirondacks. Fires are forbidden at elevations more than 4,000 feet in the Adirondacks and 3,500 feet in the Catskills (unless in emergencies)
  • The Adirondack and Catskill mountains are home to a large number of bears. You may find advice on what to do if you come across a bear, how to cook and store food at your campsite, and other valuable bear-related information on the Black Bears in New York’s Back Countryweb page.

Findinga Place to Camp Before You Go

Check out the DECinfo Locator to see state lands that have primitive camping opportunities. Other recreational possibilities accessible at these locations can be found by selecting the “Outdoor Activity” tab on the navigation bar. If you have a certain place in mind, check out thePlaces To Gopages, which provide detailed descriptions of individual homes in that area. For recommendations, you may also speak with a forester or a Lands and Forests staff member at the regional DEC office that is closest to where you want to travel for further information.

New York StateFirewoodRegulation

For a list of state lands having primitive campsites, see the DECinfo Locator. Other recreational possibilities accessible at these locations can be found under the “Outdoor Activity” category. For those looking for a specific locale, thePlaces To Gopages, which give detailed descriptions of individual properties, may be of use. You can also speak with a forester or a Lands and Forests staff member at the regional DEC office that is closest to where you want to travel for advice.

  • Purchase your firewood from a local vendor (within 50 miles of your location) and request a receipt or sticker that identifies the firewood’s regional origin. If you wish to carry firewood inside the state of New York, you must comply with the following requirements:
  • In addition, it must be within 50 miles (linear distance) of the firewood’s source or origin, as evidenced by a receipt or label identifying the wood’s source or origin
  • You must obtain a Self-Issued Certificate of Origin (PDF) for firewood cut from your own land, and the wood must be sourced within 50 miles of your destination. In New York, only firewood that has been heat treated to eliminate pests and that has been carried more than 50 miles from its source is permitted to be transported into the state. This wood should be branded as “certified heat-treated” or something like.

Please read our webpage on firewood and invasive pests for further information on the rule.

Additional inquiries about the regulation can be directed to [email protected] or by calling 1-866-640-0652 (toll-free).

More about Primitive Camping:

  • Contacts for Local Information on Backcountry Camping- Local forestry offices and forest rangers can provide answers to specific inquiries concerning backcountry camping on their own grounds.

Can You Camp Anywhere?

Camping is an intriguing hobby for nature enthusiasts because of the comfort of a heated tent warmed by a roaring campfire, the refreshing fragrance of a distant rainstorm, and the enticement of a comfortable sleeping bag. There are several locations across the world that provide a quiet hideaway in the woods, a group setting for a few excellent pals, or an isolated hilltop location.

Can you camp anywhere?

According to logic, you can potentially camp anyplace if you have permission, which is what we’ll discuss next. Campers, on the other hand, are not restricted to newly renovated campgrounds. Dispersed campsites are distributed over public areas and provide a peaceful setting for setting up a tent. There are citizen-owned campsites in some small towns, and RV owners camp at state rest areas, big-box shop parking lots, and truck stops when they are not traveling. People that camp out in the middle of nowhere with no access to water, power, or a bathhouse are known as boondockers, and they are known for getting away from it all with meticulous planning.

State and national parks

Camping is permitted in most national and state parks, either in constructed campsites or in the backcountry. Some of these present exceptional challenges for campers. It is only possible to visit certain sites by boat in places such as Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota and the Mary Island State Park in New York. Dispersed, or backcountry, camping regulations differ from park to park, but in general, hikers are required to register so that someone knows where they are and who owns the vehicle in which they are traveling.

RV enthusiasts should check ahead of time to see whether the park’s roads are broad enough and if the campsites are large enough to accommodate large vehicles.

More about camping Joshua Tree National Park

Joshua Tree National Park in southern California is a wonderful example of federal properties that can accommodate a wide range of campers of all types. Tent, RV, and horse campers are permitted in eight semi-developed campsites, some of which are open seasonally. None of the campgrounds provide full hookups, however. Keep in mind that the campsites at this popular park tend to fill up quickly. Backcountry camping is completely free, however hikers must first fill out a registration form at a backcountry registration board before venturing into the forest for an overnight stay in order to get credit.

Camp on hard surfaces away from water sources and trailheads, and be mindful of the surrounding wildlife when doing so.

Are there free campsites?

Thousands of acres of public land are available for free camping on weekends and holidays. Dispersed camping is permitted without charge in national forests, Bureau of Land Management regions, and several national parks, which are located distant from established campsites. Be aware that many national parks demand an admission fee to enter their grounds. Consider obtaining an America the Beautiful pass, which allows you free access to practically all public lands in the United States. Generally speaking, most free camping locations have a maximum of roughly 14 days for camping in a particular spot, however campers are allowed to relocate to another location if they choose to.

Free camping is available at several state-run rest spots. The use of self-contained recreational vehicles (RVs) for overnight parking is not encouraged; nonetheless, it is permitted.

Backcountry considerations

Backcountry campers have a unique set of factors that must be taken into account. Having enough water requires transporting a filter device or bringing packing water with you. The food must be light while also being filling. Rain gear, a tent or hammock, and clothes suited for the season – as well as essentials such as a camp stove and a method of starting a fire – should all be carried in a little amount of space. Backcountry campers must carry away everything they bring into their campsite, including rubbish, because there is no waste collection service available.

Camping Areas – CT State Parks and Forests

All DEEP services that deal directly with customers have resumed normal business operations. For further information on what this entails, please see the following link to our “New Normal” website: INFORMATION ON THE DEEP NEW NORMAL

2021 State Park Camping Areas

**A processing charge and occupancy tax are included in the price of rustic cabin reservations.

BLACK ROCK STATE PARK

During the 2021 season, the Black Rock State Park Campground will be open from April 9 through September 6, weather permitting (daily). Cabins are available for rent on Friday and Saturday nights, as well as on Sunday evenings. Reservations for Cabins are required to be made for a minimum of two nights.

  • Route 6, Watertown
  • A total of 78 forested and open camping spots. There is a dump station, restrooms, showers, fishing, and swimming available. There are no dogs allowed, and alcohol is strictly prohibited. If possible, please refrain from bringing alcoholic beverages
  • Campsite Reservations
  • Park Office (860 283-8088)
  • Campground Map:
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DEVIL’S HOPYARD STATE PARK

The Devil’s Hopyard Campground will be open from April 9th through October 11th, 2021, for the next season. The water of Devil’s Hopyard State Park is contaminated and should not be consumed. If you are camping or utilizing a day pavilion, please remember to provide your own water.

  • There are 21 woodland campsites by a picturesque waterfall at 366 Hopyard Road in East Haddam. Swimming is not permitted in the stream. There will be no pets allowed. Residents of Connecticut pay $14 per night per campground. There is a processing fee for bookings
  • For non-CT residents, the fee is $24/night/campsite. When you make a reservation, there is a processing fee. Reservations for campsites can be made by calling (860) 526-2336. Map of the campground:
HAMMONASSET BEACH STATE PARK

The Hammonasset Beach State Park campsite will be open from May 28 to October 11 for the 2021 season, according to the park’s website (daily).

  • The William F. Miller Campground is located at 1288 Boston Post Road (Route 1) in Madison. There are 558 available locations. Concession, dumping station, restrooms, and showers are available. Swimming and fishing in saltwater are popular pastimes. There are no individual fireplaces available. There will be no pets allowed. The cost of a campsite is $20 per night for Connecticut residents plus a processing fee
  • $35 per night for CT residents who want an electric water hook-up plus a processing fee
  • $30 per night for non-CT residents plus a processing fee
  • $45 per night for non-CT residents who want an electric water hook-up plus a processing fee
  • And $30 per night for non-CT residents who want a processing fee Reservations for campsites may be made by calling the campground office (203) 245-1817 or the park office (203) 245-2785. A map of the campground can be seen here.

Cabins may only be reserved for a week at a time (Sunday to Sunday).

  • Rustic Cabins are available for $70 per night for Connecticut residents plus a processing fee. **
  • Rustic Cabins are available for $80 per night for non-CT residents plus a processing fee.
HOPEVILLE POND STATE PARK

The Hopeville Pond State Park Campground will be available for the 2021 season from April 9 to October 11, with the season beginning on April 9.

  • At 929 Hopeville Road in Griswold, there are 80 woodland camping spots beside a pond. Toilets, showers, and a dump station are available. Swimming and fishing are popular pastimes. There will be no pets allowed. The cost of a campground is $17 per night for Connecticut residents plus a processing fee, and $27 per night for non-CT residents plus a processing fee. Campsite reservations can be made by calling the Campground Office at (860) 376-0313 or the Park Office at (860) 376-2920. Campsites with power and water hookups are available for $27 per night for Connecticut residents and $37 per night for non-CT residents. Campground map is available here:

Reservations are accepted for the cabin. Three nights are required as a bare minimum.

  • Rustic Cabin + a Processing Fee** is $50 per night for Connecticut residents
  • $60 per night for non-CT residents. a Rustic Cabin and a Processing Fee**
HOUSATONIC MEADOWS STATE PARK

The Housatonic Meadows State Park Campground will be available for the 2021 season from May 28 to September 6, with the first day of operation being May 28. (daily). Cabins are available for rent on Friday and Saturday nights, as well as on Sunday evenings. Reservations for Cabins are required to be made for a minimum of two nights.

  • In a rural location along the Housatonic River, Route 7 in Sharon offers 61 camping spots. Toilets, showers, and a dump station are available. There will be no swimming. There are no dogs allowed, and alcohol is strictly prohibited. If possible, please refrain from bringing alcoholic beverages
  • Campsite Reservations
  • Campground Office (860) 672-6772
  • Park Office (860) 927-3238
  • Campground Map:
KETTLETOWN STATE PARK

The Kettletown State Park Campground will be available for the 2021 season from May 28 to October 11, with the first day of operation being May 28. (daily).

  • 1400 Georges Hill Road, Southbury
  • 61 properties, some of which are forested, others open. There is a dump station, restrooms, showers, and fishing. Trailers and recreational vehicles (RVs) may not be longer than 28 feet in length. There will be no pets allowed. USE OF ALCOHOL IS PROHIBITED. If possible, please refrain from bringing alcoholic beverages
  • Campsite Reservations
  • Campground Office (203) 264-5678
  • Park Office (203) 264-5169
  • Campground Map:
LAKE WARAMAUG STATE PARK

During the summer of 2021, the Lake Waramaug State Park Campground will be available from May 28 through October 11, weather permitting (daily). Cabins are available for rent on Friday and Saturday nights, as well as on Sunday evenings. Reservations for Cabins are required to be made for a minimum of two nights.

  • USE OF ALCOHOL IS PROHIBITED. PLEASE DO NOT BRING ANY ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES TO THE EVENT. 76 woodland and open campsites with lake views are located at 30 Lake Waramaug Road in New Preston. There is a dump station, restrooms, showers, fishing, and swimming available. There will be no pets allowed. The cost of a campsite is $17 per night for CT residents plus a processing fee
  • $27 per night for non-CT residents plus a processing fee
  • $50 per night for CT residents plus a processing fee **
  • $60 per night for non-CT residents plus a processing fee**. Campsite reservations can be made by calling the Campground Office at (860) 868-0220 or the Park Office at (860) 868-2592.
MACEDONIA BROOK STATE PARK

The Macedonia Brook State Park Campground will be available for the 2021 season from April 9 through October 11, with the season beginning on April 9 and ending on October 11. (daily).

  • In Kent, at 159 Macedonia Brook Road, there are 51 campsites in a rural environment. Stream fishing, fantastic hiking, and no bathing are all available. There are no dogs allowed, and alcohol is strictly prohibited. If possible, please refrain from bringing alcoholic beverages
  • The cost of a campsite is $14 per night for Connecticut residents plus a processing fee, and $24 per night for non-CT residents plus a processing fee. Campsite reservations can be made by calling the campground office at (860) 927-4100 or the park office at (860) 927-3238.
MASHAMOQUET BROOK STATE PARK

The Mashamoquet Brook State Park Campground will be available from April 9th through September 6th in 2021 for the summer camping season. Wolf Den Campground will be open from May 28th to October 11th, weather permitting (daily).

  • Wolf Den Campground is located at 147 Wolf Den Drive (Route 44), Pomfret, Connecticut, and has 35 available campsites. Bathrooms, showers, and a dumping station are available. Nearby activities include fishing, hiking, and swimming. There are no pets allowed.
  • CT residents pay $14 per night per campground plus a processing fee
  • Non-CT residents pay $24 per night per campsite plus a processing fee. Site 20 has an additional $15 fee for water and power trailer connection. Reservations for campsites can be made by calling (860) 928-6121 (Park Office).

Map of the campground: 320 Road, Mashamoquet Road (Route 44), Pomfret, Connecticut A total of 18 woodland campsites are available at Mashamoquet Brook Campground. Composting toilets are available. Fishing, hiking, and swimming are all available near the dump station. There are no pets allowed.

  • CT residents pay $14 per night per campground plus a processing fee
  • Non-CT residents pay $24 per night per campsite plus a processing fee. Reservations for campsites can be made by calling (860) 928-6121 (Park Office).
ROCKY NECK STATE PARK

During the summer of 2021, the Rocky Neck State Park Campground will be open from May 21 to October 2, weather permitting (daily).

  • Niantic, Connecticut
  • 244 West Main Street (Route 156)
  • 160 forested and open plots. Concession, dumping station, restrooms, and showers are available. Fishing and swimming in salt water are popular pastimes. There will be no pets allowed. CT residents pay $20 per night and campground plus a processing fee
  • Non-CT residents pay $30 per night and campsite plus a processing fee. More information
  • Reservations for camping sites
  • Map of the campground:

Cabins may only be reserved for a week at a time (Sunday to Sunday).

  • Rustic Cabin + a Processing Fee** is $70 per night for Connecticut residents
  • $80 per night for non-CT residents. a processing fee in addition to the cost of the rustic cabin. **
  • Campground Office: (860) 739-1339/Park Main Office: (860) 739-5471
SALT ROCK CAMPGROUND

The Salt Rock State Park Campground will be available for the 2021 season from May 14 to October 11, with the season beginning on May 14 and ending on October 11. (daily).

  • I-395 Exit 83 leads to 173 Scotland Road (Rte. 97) in Baltic, which is 06330. Take a left at the fork in the road and continue Route 97 into Baltic. 2 miles north on the left, just beyond Salt Rock Road
  • 2 miles north on the left
  • There are 71 tent and recreational vehicle (RV) camping spots. Some sites provide utilities, such as a restroom, a dumping station, showers, and an in-ground swimming pool (which opens in mid-June). Fishing is permitted. There is a limit of two pets per site. Residents of Connecticut may expect to pay the following nightly rates:
  • A tent site costs $33 per night
  • A site with electricity and water costs $37 per night
  • And a site with power, water, and sewer costs $40 per night plus a processing fee. For those who do not reside in Connecticut, the rates are $45, $48, and $52 per night, plus a processing fee.
  • Tent sites are $222 for a 7-night week, electric and water sites are $249 for a 7-night week, and electric, water, and sewage sites are $270 for a 7-night week plus a processing fee.
  • Tent sites are $222 for a 7-night week, electric and water sites are $249 for a 7-night week, and electric, water, and sewage sites are $270 for a 7-night week, plus a processing fee

Reservations for campsites (860) 822-0884 Campground Map: (860) 822-0884

STATE FOREST CAMPING AREAS

The Austin Hawes Campground in American Legion State Forest will be available for the 2021 season from April 9 through October 11, with the peak season being April 9 through October 11. (daily). Cabins are available for rent on Friday and Saturday nights, as well as on Sunday evenings. Reservations for Cabins are required to be made for a minimum of two nights.

PACHAUG STATE FOREST

The Green Falls Campground in Pachaug State Forest will be available from April 9 through October 11 for the 2021 season, with the season beginning on April 9. (daily). The Mount Misery Campground in Pachaug State Forest will be available from April 9 through October 11 for the 2021 season, according to the Forest Service (daily).

  • Mt. Misery Campground is located north of Voluntown, along Route 49. There are 22 woodland sites. Stream fishing and swimming are available nearby. There is a limit of one pet per site.
  • Reservations are required, and alcohol is strictly prohibited. If possible, please refrain from bringing alcoholic beverages
  • For residents of Connecticut, the rate is $17 a night per campsite, plus a processing fee. Non-CT residents pay $27/night/campsite plus a processing fee
  • Call Forest Headquarters at (860) 376-4075 for further information. Map of the campground:

HORSE CAMP AREAS

Listed below are equestrian-only campgrounds that have been specifically created for horseback riding. Open from April 10 through November 25, closed on Thanksgiving. First-come, first-served basis for all available spaces. Riders who bring their own mounts are welcome to stay at a camping facility. There are no horse rentals available.

NATCHAUG STATE FOREST
  • Silvermine Horse Camp is located at 109 Kingsbury Road near Eastford. There are 15 woodland sites. Basic amenities are provided
  • Campers are responsible for cleaning up their sites and disposing of all waste. Pets are allowed. There is no charge. The campsite is located on state property that are available to hunting
  • The Mashamoquet Brook State Park Office may be reached at (860) 928-6121.
PACHAUG STATE FOREST

The Equestrian Campground in Pachaug State Forest will be available from April 9 through October 11 for the 2021 season, with the season beginning on April 9. (daily).

  • Voluntown, as well as Frog Hollow Horse Camp, are nearby. There are 18 semi-wooded plots. Allowing pets is allowed
  • The campsite is located on state properties that are available to hunting
  • Connecticut residents pay $17 per night for a campsite
  • Non-CT residents pay $27 per night for a space. The campground closes at noon on Columbus Day
  • Call (860) 376-4075.

Content on the Camping Main Page was last updated on July 20, 2021.

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