When Will Tent Rocks Reopen 2021

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument has proposed a change to its cost system, which will take effect on October 15, 2021. The Draft Business Plan contains the specifics of this proposal in further detail. The agreement was endorsed by all sides following an extensive market study, a period of public discussion, engagement with the Pueblo of Cochiti, and a presentation to the Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Council (RAC). For the previous 25 years, the Monument’s fees have remained unchanged, and this idea was necessary in order to assist balance operational costs, offer basic facilities, and lessen reliance on other financing sources.

Once the final Business Plan has been finished, it will be shared on this website.

Update as of July 9, 2021: Public access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is presently unavailable due to inclement weather.

Trails are being upgraded as part of the project to relieve safety issues within the monument.

  • The plan was developed in consultation with the National Park Service.
  • While the first closure was intended to decrease COVID-19 exposure in the gateway hamlet of Pueblo de Cochiti, the Bureau of Land Management has chosen to keep the Monument closed until a reopening plan has been devised and approved by the federal government.
  • The Bureau of Land Management hopes that, as a result of these efforts, the Monument will re-open in a manner that minimizes negative affects on the land and resources, as well as on the Cochiti people, and that visitors will have a better overall experience.
  • When we reopen, we look forward to seeing all of our guests again!
  • The monument is located in the heart of the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument.
  • It is solely accessible by foot and consists of two pieces that offer chances for hiking, birding, geology observation, and flora identification among other activities.
  • Massive explosions from the Jemez volcanic region ejected pyroclasts (rock pieces), while scorching hot gases erupted down slopes in an incandescent avalanche known as a pyroclastic flow, causing a pyroclastic flow to form.

Some of the tent rock formations have lost their strong, resistant caprocks and are crumbling away.

Please keep in mind that pets are not permitted within the Monument.

and 4:00 p.m.

Visitors must be out of the restricted area surrounding the fee booth by the time it closes.

Please be advised that owing to increased tourist traffic and a shortage of available parking, guests may face admission delays beginning at 9 a.m.

Waiting times might range from 30 to 90 minutes depending on the location.

In addition to New Year’s Day (January 1), the monument will be closed on the following dates: January 6, the Friday prior to Good Friday and Saturday prior to Good Friday and Saturday before Easter, Easter Sunday, and the Monday following Easter Sunday; May 3; July 13; July 14; July 25; November 1; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Eve; Christmas Day; and New Year’s Eve.

Programs: National Conservation Lands: New Mexico: Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument has proposed a change to its cost system, which will take effect on October 15, 2021. The Draft Business Plan contains the specifics of this proposal in further detail. The agreement was endorsed by all sides following an extensive market study, a period of public discussion, engagement with the Pueblo of Cochiti, and a presentation to the Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Council (RAC). For the previous 25 years, the Monument’s fees have remained unchanged, and this idea was necessary in order to assist balance operational costs, offer basic facilities, and lessen reliance on other financing sources.

  • Once the final Business Plan has been finished, it will be shared on this website.
  • Updated on July 9, 2021: Public access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is presently unavailable due to inclement weather.
  • Trails are being upgraded as part of the project to relieve safety issues within the monument.
  • The plan was developed in consultation with the National Park Service.
  • The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is continuing to collaborate closely with the Pueblo de Cochiti to establish a reopening plan that will address long-standing challenges such as over-visitation, excessive wait times, staffing requirements, and the capacity to provide resource protection.
  • As reopening plans become more formalized, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will release fresh information to the public through our website and social media accounts.
  • The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a spectacular outdoor laboratory, providing a unique chance to watch, analyze, and experience the geologic processes that build natural landscapes.
  • The Pajarito Plateau National Monument, located in north-central New Mexico on the Pajarito Plateau, contains a national recreation path and has elevations ranging from 5,570 feet to 6,760 feet above sea level.
  • The cone-shaped tent rock formations are the result of volcanic eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago and produced layers of pumice, ash, and tuff that were more than 1,000 feet thick in some places.
  • Some of the tents have lost their firm, impervious caprocks and are beginning to crumble and disintegrate.

While the tent rock formations are rather consistent in design, their height can range from a few feet to more than 90 feet. Season/Hours Hours of Operation: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

  • Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument has proposed a change to its price system, which will take effect on October 15, 2021. The Draft Business Plan has further information about this idea. The agreement was endorsed by both parties following an extensive market study, a period of public discussion, consultation with the Pueblo of Cochiti, and a presentation to the Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Council (RAC). The fees charged by the Monument have remained unchanged for the previous 25 years, and this idea was necessary in order to assist balance running costs, offer basic amenities, and lessen reliance on other financing sources. At this moment, there is no specific schedule for the application of new fees or the reopening of the market. It will be shared once the final Business Plan has been finished. When the Monument reopens, we look forward to seeing all of our previous guests again. Updated on July 9, 2021. Public access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is presently unavailable. Since closing, the Bureau of Land Management has had the chance to work on initiatives that will improve the visitor experience when the park reopens in the coming months. Improved paths are among the projects planned for the monument, which will help to relieve worries about public safety there. A draft business plan for the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument Recreation Program has also been published, which details the current state of the program and ensures that it is in compliance with applicable statutes and laws while also setting forth future management goals and priorities for the program. While the first closure was intended to decrease COVID-19 exposure in the Pueblo de Cochiti gateway town, the Bureau of Land Management has chosen to keep the Monument closed until a reopening plan has been determined. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is continuing to work closely with the Pueblo de Cochiti to establish a reopening plan that will address long-standing challenges such as over-visitation, excessive wait times, staffing requirements, and the capacity to provide resource protection. Through these initiatives, the BLM hopes to restore the Monument in a manner that minimizes effects on the land and resources, as well as on the Cochiti people, and that will result in a better overall visitor experience for all. According to the Bureau of Land Management, fresh information will be released to the public via our website and social media sites as reopening plans become more firm. When we reopen, we hope to see many of our previous guests. The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a spectacular outdoor laboratory, providing a unique chance to watch, analyze, and experience the geologic processes that build natural landscapes. The monument is located in the heart of the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Recreation Area. At 5,570 to 6,760 feet above sea level, the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico is home to the National Monument, which contains a national recreation route and ranges in elevation from 5,570 to 6,760 feet. It is exclusively accessible by foot and is divided into two sections that offer hiking, birding, geology observation, and flora identification opportunities. It is believed that volcanic eruptions that occurred between 6 and 7 million years ago produced the cone-shaped tent rock formations, which are over 1,000 feet thick in some places. Tremendous explosions from the Jemez volcanic region emitted pyroclasts (rock pieces), while scorching hot gases shot down slopes, causing a pyroclastic flow, which is an incandescent avalanche. Bulkhead caps, which are perched precariously on top of many of the tapering hoodoos, protect the softer pumice and tuff underneath them. The firm, resistant caprocks of several tents have been lost, and the tents are beginning to crumble. While the tent rock formations are pretty regular in design, their height can range from a few feet to as high as 90 feet, depending on the individual. Season/Hours Opening and closing times for the facility are as follows: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday, Saturday and Sunday, and 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Sunday, and Saturday and Sunday, and Saturday and Sunday,

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument has proposed modifying its price system, which will take effect on October 15, 2021. The Draft Business Plan contains the specifics of this proposal. The agreement was endorsed by all sides following an extensive market study, a period of public discussion, consultation with the Pueblo of Cochiti, and presentation to the Northern New Mexico Resource Advisory Council (RAC). For the previous 25 years, the Monument’s fees have remained unchanged, and this idea was required in order to assist balance running costs, offer basic facilities, and lessen reliance on other financing sources.

  1. Once the final Business Plan has been finalized, it will be made available online.
  2. Update on July 9, 2021: Public access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is presently unavailable due to construction.
  3. Trails will be upgraded as part of the project to relieve safety issues within the monument.
  4. While the first closure was intended to decrease COVID-19 exposure in the Pueblo de Cochiti community, the Bureau of Land Management has chosen to keep the Monument closed until a reopening plan has been established.
  5. The Bureau of Land Management hopes that, as a result of these efforts, the Monument will re-open in a manner that minimizes negative affects on the land and resources, as well as on the Cochiti people, and that it will provide a better experience for all visitors.
  6. When we reopen, we look forward to seeing all of our visitors!
  7. The monument is located in the heart of the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument.
  8. It is solely accessible by foot and consists of two pieces that offer hiking, birding, geology observation, and flora identification opportunities.

Massive explosions from the Jemez volcanic region shot pyroclasts (rock pieces) into the air, while scorching hot gases erupted down slopes in an incandescent avalanche known as a “pyroclastic flow,” which means “flaming flow.” Boulder caps, perched precariously atop several of the tapering hoodoos, protect the softer pumice and tuff underneath them.

While the tent rock formations are pretty consistent in design, their height can range from a few feet to more than 90 feet. Season/Hours Hours of Operation: Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

  • Traveling north on I-25 from Albuquerque, take the exit for Santo Domingo/Cochiti Lake Recreation Area (Exit 259) off I-25 and onto NM 22 to reach the park. To get to Cochiti Pueblo and Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, use the NM 22 north. From Santa Fe, travel south on I-25 until you reach the Cochiti Pueblo Exit 264 off I-25, which will put you on NM 16. Exit New Mexico 16 onto New Mexico 22, and follow the signs to Cochiti Pueblo and the National Monument. Please keep in mind that following the GPS coordinates may lead you over tribal territories that are not accessible. If you’re coming from I-25, please follow the guidelines above to get to the Monument.

Accessibility

  • Restrooms, picnic areas, information kiosks, and parking are all accessible to those with disabilities. The Cave Loop Trail is 1.2 miles long and is classed as easy. Despite the fact that the path is mostly gravel and sand, there are a few areas that are wheelchair accessible. Picnic spaces, restrooms, pathways, and other amenities are all accessible to those with disabilities at the Veterans’ Memorial Overlook.

Information on the Trail

  • Route Guide
  • The national monument has a national recreational trail that may be accessed by car or by foot. It is solely accessible by foot and consists of two pieces that offer chances for hiking, birding, geology observation, and flora identification among other activities. Cave Loop Path is 1.2 miles long and is classed as easy. Both portions of the trail begin at the authorized monument parking lot
  • Both segments are accessible by car or on foot. In comparison, the Canyon Trail is 1.5 miles round trip and climbs steeply (630 feet) to the top of the mesa, where you may enjoy spectacular views of the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, and Sandia mountains as well as the Rio Grande Valley. However, during severe weather, the canyon may flash flood and lightning strikes the ridges
  • Therefore, caution should be exercised when using either path. The Veterans Memorial Route is a 1-mile circle trail that is classed as very simple and is wheel chair accessible. It is located near the Veterans Memorial Park. There are three miles of gravel covered road leading to the Veterans Memorial, which provides a beautiful view of the Peralta Canyon and Jemez Mountain peaks. Ample picnic tables, shelters, and restroom facilities are available at both locations.

Prohibitions and Restrictions are in place.

  • Dogs are not permitted on the grounds of the Monument, with the exception of assistance animals. Only for use throughout the day
  • The use of fires, shooting, alcoholic beverages, glass containers, or climbing on the “tent rocks” is prohibited. Trespassing on tribal, private, or state land is strictly prohibited. The Cochiti Tribal Governor has the authority to close the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks to the public at any time. Closures will be announced at the entrance gate. There are no motorized vehicles or mountain bikes allowed on the property. Preserve the health of living trees and bushes. Without a permission, you are not permitted to harvest green trees or firewood. There is no collection of flora, rocks, obsidian “apache tears,” or fauna
  • There is also no hunting or fishing. Please keep to the roads and paths that have been marked. Geocaching is strictly forbidden. Please do not provide food to the wildlife. Hunting and recreational shooting are not permitted within the Monument
  • However, camping is permitted.
See also:  How To Keep Bugs Away From Your Tent

Dogs, with the exception of assistance animals, are not permitted on the grounds. Only for daytime use. There are no open fires, shooting, alcoholic beverages, glass containers, or climbing on the “tent rocks” allowed. Trespassing on tribal, private, or state property is strictly prohibited. By decree of the Cochiti Tribal Governor, access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks may be denied. Temporary closures will be placed at the entrance gate; and There are no motorized vehicles or mountain bikes allowed on the premises.

Without a permit, you are not permitted to harvest green trees or firewood; A prohibition on the collection or harvesting of flora, rocks, obsidian “apache tears,” or wildlife is in effect; Stay on the roads and paths that have been marked.

We respectfully request that you refrain from feeding the wildlife.

  • Trail Guide
  • Interactive Map
  • Printable Map
  • Plant Guide
  • Bird Guide
  • Junior Ranger Activity Guide
  • Rocks Rock! Trail Guide
  • Printable Map The Trails Learning Education Initiative (Hit the Trails) is a learning initiative that takes place on trails around the United States.

Kasha Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument Ticketed Entry, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is located in Kasha, Arizona. Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, which was established by the United States Congress in 2001, is located in north-central New Mexico on the Pajarito Plateau. Volcanic ash, pumice, and tuff deposits from eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago have resulted in the construction of unusual cone-shaped rock formations as a result of wind and water erosion. These areas are officially acknowledged as the ancestral homelands of the Cochiti, and they are being administered in close collaboration with the Pueblo.

The Bureau of Land Management, in collaboration with our partners in the gateway community of Pueblo de Cochiti, will implement a day use reservation system in order to reopen Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument and meet the requirements of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as state and local guidelines for COVID-19.

A reservation will be required for each vehicle accessing the Monument.

and remain until 2 p.m. When all visitors have left the Monument, it will be closed until 5:00 p.m. Because the Monument is a popular location for visitors from Albuquerque and Santa Fe, making reservations in advance is highly advised!

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, which was established by the United States Congress in 2001, is located in north-central New Mexico on the Pajarito Plateau. Volcanic ash, pumice, and tuff deposits from eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago have resulted in the construction of unusual cone-shaped rock formations as a result of wind and water erosion. These areas are officially acknowledged as the ancestral homelands of the Cochiti, and they are being administered in close collaboration with the Pueblo.

The Bureau of Land Management, in collaboration with our partners in the gateway community of Pueblo de Cochiti, will implement a day use reservation system in order to reopen Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument and meet the requirements of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as state and local guidelines for COVID-19.

A reservation will be required for each vehicle accessing the Monument.

and remain until 2 p.m.

Because the Monument is a popular location for visitors from Albuquerque and Santa Fe, making reservations in advance is highly advised!

Need to Know

  • Rules for Participation This permit does not grant access to a parking place, but it does allow for one car to enter Monument between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Those who have made a reservation must enter during this time period
  • Visitors who arrive after 2 p.m. will not be given entry. Until 5:00 p.m., the Monument will be available to tourists, at which time they must leave. I’m not sure how many reservations I’ll need. A vehicle and all of its occupants are only required to make a single day-use reservation. Visitors are permitted to make a maximum of three private vehicle reservations per day. Requirements for Making a Reservation Reserving a day use car must be done either online at Recreation.gov or through the Recreation.gov mobile app on your smartphone. It is not possible to purchase reservations at the Kasha-Katuwe. It is not permitted to resell or auction day use reservations, and it is not permitted to transfer day use reservations. Arrive Earlier than Expected It is advised that you come before 1:00 p.m. in order to guarantee that you have enough time to finish the Slot Canyon Trail. Time for the park to close Starting at 3:30 p.m. from the end of the Slot Canyon Trail on top of the Mesa, park Rangers begin the process of closing down the park. As a courtesy to the local gateway village of Pueblo de Cochiti, the Monument will close punctually at 5 p.m. each day. PetsPets are strictly forbidden. A passIf you have an annual or lifetime pass at the time of your reservation, those will be accepted in lieu of the private vehicle admission cost
  • Nevertheless, you will be forced to pay $2 to make a reservation, which is non-refundable. Passes recognized by the Interagency include: Interagency Annual Pass, Interagency Senior Pass, Interagency Access Pass, Interagency Volunteer Pass, Interagency Military Pass, Interagency 4th Grade Pass, Golden Age Pass, and Golden Access. At the admission station, a valid photo ID that matches the pass is required. Trails and other amenities: The paths are solely open to pedestrian traffic. There will be no horses, bicycles, or motorized vehicles. The Cave Loop Trail is 1.2 miles long and is graded as easy by the Forest Service. The Slot Canyon Trail is a 1.5-mile, one-way hike through a tight canyon with a steep (630-foot) ascent to the mesa top, where you may enjoy spectacular views of the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, and Sandia mountains, as well as the Rio Grande Valley. Ascending and through narrow fissures and along steep ledges above drop-offs with hands and feet is considered fairly demanding since it requires the use of both hands and feet. It is advised that you wear sturdy footwear. In addition to being wheelchair accessible, the Veterans Memorial Route is a 1-mile long circle trail that is classified as very simple. It may be reached from the overlook parking area. Weather Temperatures in the summer can reach up to 90 degrees. During the summer monsoon season, flash flooding may occur in the canyon, and lightning may hit the ridges of the canyon. Snowstorms and temperatures below freezing are possible throughout the winter. Storms in both the winter and summer months have the potential to close the Monument. Services At the Monument, there is no access to food or drink. It is recommended that visitors carry at least one quart (one liter) of water each person to the event. Services and amenities are offered at both trailheads, including accessible picnic tables, shelters, and vault toilets
  • No traces should be left behind. Thank you for remaining respectful of natural resources and cultural objects such as rocks and buildings. Pack everything you’ve brought in and just take photographs with you back home.

Booking Windows

Rules for Participation: It is not possible to reserve a parking space with this permit, but it does allow for one vehicle to enter Monument between the hours of 8:00 am and 2:00 pm. All visitors who have made a reservation must enter during this time period; those who arrive after 2 p.m. will not be given entry. Until 5:00 p.m., the Monument will be open for visitors, after which they must leave. Are there any restrictions on the number of bookings I may make? For a car and all of its occupants, only a single day’s reservation is necessary.

  • Requirements for Making a Booking Daily vehicle bookings must be made online at Recreation.gov or by downloading and registering for an account on the Recreation.gov mobile application.
  • It is not permitted to resell or auction day use reservations, and it is not permitted to transfer day use reservations; Early Arrival Is Highly Recommended It is advised that you come before 1:00 p.m.
  • It is time to leave the park.
  • from the end of the Slot Canyon Trail on top of the Mesa, park Rangers begin the process of shutting the park.
  • every day.
  • A passIf you have an annual or lifetime pass at the time of your reservation, those will be accepted in lieu of the private car admission cost; nevertheless, you will be required to pay for a reservation fee of $2 (which is nonrefundable).
  • At the admission station, you must present a valid ID that matches the pass.

Foot travel is the only kind of transportation permitted on the paths.

A 1.2-mile loop trail, the Cave Loop Trail is regarded as simple because of its short length.

Ascending and through narrow fissures and along steep ledges above drop-offs using hands and feet is regarded fairly hard because of the need to use both hands and feet.

In addition to being wheelchair accessible from the parking lot at the overlook, the Veterans Memorial Route has a 1-mile long circle trail that has been graded as extremely simple.

It is possible for the canyon to flash flood and for lightning to hit the ridges during the summer monsoon season.

It is possible that storms will close the Monument in both the winter and summer months.

We recommend that each visitor brings a minimum of one quart (one liter) of drinking water.

There should be no evidence of your presence.

Make a list of everything you brought in and just take photographs with you home;

Changes and Cancellations

Reservation Cost: There is a $2.00 non-refundable reservation fee per ticket. Amenity Fee: There is a $2.00 non-refundable amenity fee per ticket.

  • A standard car (for 1-8 passengers) costs $5.00 per vehicle
  • A van (9-25 passengers) costs $25.00 per van
  • And a bus (for 26-100 passengers) costs $100.00 per bus.

Passholders are need to pay a $2.00 non-refundable reservation charge in addition to their pass. Be prepared to produce your annual or lifetime pass, the linked valid ID, and your day use car reservation ticket when asked to display them. The following valid admission passes are accepted:

  • Interagency Annual Pass
  • Interagency Senior Annual or Lifetime Pass
  • Interagency Access Pass
  • Interagency Volunteer Pass
  • Interagency Military Pass
  • Interagency 4th Grade Pass
  • Golden Age Pass
  • Golden Access Pass

Policy on Cancellation: If you are unable to travel, please notify us as soon as possible. Cancellations must be sent in writing by midnight on the day before the scheduled arrival date in order to receive a complete refund minus the non-refundable per-ticket reservation charge. Tickets that are cancelled or amended after midnight on the day of the reservation will not be refunded under any circumstances. Please login to your Recreation.gov account to view and cancel your reservation in order to submit your cancellation.

A refund of the amenity charge will be issued if the Monument is closed as a result of a weather-related occurrence.

Contact Information

Rio Puerco Field Office is located at 100 Sun Avenue NE in Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109.

Phone Number

505-761-8700

Available Tours and Tickets

Unfortunately, this trail has been closed. If and when it reopens, we’ll make sure to update this page. 5.0 kilometers in length with a 256 m elevation increase Route type is a type of route. Friendliness to LoopKid HikingCaveViews Wildflowers Wildlife RockyClosedFeeDogs are not permitted. Description Waypoints are important (3) FacilitiesContact How to Get There CLOSURE OF COVID-19: COVID-19 has forced the closure of this region as of March 23, 21. Please see the website for further details.

  • The Slot contains several spectacular examples of rock layers, hoodos, and the impact of wind and water on the rock formation.
  • Going through tunnels and up ledges is part of the game.
  • The loop for tiny children with physical disabilities is beautiful, with towering raptures and cliffs.
  • Maintain your position on the route since it is a holy spot.
  • Private automobiles are $5; groups of up to 25 people are $25 each.
  • A day-use permit from the BLM is required.
  • The Monument’s gates will be open from 8 a.m.

Time of day that the business is open Entry into the Monument is permitted between the hours of 8:00 a.m.

Closing operations begin at 3:30 p.m., with the goal of having the Monument completely cleared by 5:00 p.m.

During the summer months, the Monument sees a significant rise in visitor numbers.

commencing on Monday, April 15.

New guests will be permitted admission as soon as parking spaces become available.

Easter Sunday The Monday following Easter May 3rd, July 13th and 14th, July 25th, and November 1st, Thanksgiving Day Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Observations and critiques (1,025) Photos are available upon request (2,138) Aspects of daily life (530) It has been completed (2,492) What the hell is “really occurring” here, we’ve read all of the “stories” as to why and others, but this park and path should be available to the public.

  • (I apologize for the lateness of my review.
  • Views of this strange terrain are very breathtaking.
  • One of my all-time favorite hikes, this was really fantastic.
  • It’s a shame that people can’t comprehend science and evidence when it comes to the fact that there have been absolutely no cases of COVID transferred OUTSIDE while hiking.
  • And trust me when I say that the administration has attempted to demonstrate differently.
  • This trek is very gorgeous.
  • In the meanwhile, I’m aware that it’s closed due to a conflict with covid and reservation management.
See also:  What Kind Of Heater Can I Use For Tent Camping With Electricity

In several sections of the route, social distance is not always achievable due to the natural environment.

Furthermore, this evaluation is intended for hikers who want to visit the park when it reopens after a period of closure.

When you reach the summit, the trek is enjoyable and satisfying.

Heat fatigue should be avoided on hot days (as should be avoided at all times), because the breeze does not get down into the canyon.

The tribes have complete authority to govern this territory in the manner that they consider proper.

Anyone who demands to be admitted must first examine oneself and realize their status as a visitor in these areas, if and when the tribe is gracious enough to allow us to return for another visit.

I’m hoping to make a repeat visit in the near future.

The habit of tribal property blocking their OUTDOOR trails and access roads to trailheads indefinitely “because to COVID” has gotten completely out of control.

Another short word of caution for those who are ready to pass judgment: expecting public lands (in this case, owned by the Bureau of Land Management) to be available in one location when they are open in nearly every other region of the country is not a “privilege.” Is it true that all of the trails are closed, or are they still accessible?

  1. Walking a route in the open air, even without a mask, poses little harm to one’s health.
  2. As a medical practitioner, I am not an opponent of face masking.
  3. Let’s use our common sense and start the trial process!
  4. If it hadn’t been for the surrounding hiking trails, it would have been a completely useless trip.
  5. Everyone who has written a review since the outbreak has been a jerk.
  6. DO NOT DISAPPEAR.
  7. Yes, the site states that it is closed, however this is often used as a barrier to keep people away from visiting.
  8. They were on the verge of throwing me in jail for attempting to ride there.
  9. I’m attempting to find out if the trails are still accessible today, September 25th, 2020.
  10. I’m wondering if anyone has been there and can tell me whether you can still “access” the path and views even if the park is officially “closed.” I don’t want to waste time driving there if it’s inaccessible in any other way.
  11. It simply states that in order to keep people away.

It’s a beautiful landscape to see. Keep an eye out for ice at the summit. It’s just breathtaking! Excellent trek, which I would highly suggest! I visited this route in November of 2018. Does anyone know if it is still open? I see current reviews, yet the description states that the site is closed.

Comment from AllTrails

According to the Bureau of Land Management’s website, this region is still closed at the time of writing. The best trek I’ve ever done! You get to trek through a canyon, which is a wonderful experience. It comes highly recommended. Dogs are not permitted on the premises. Hiking is a simple and enjoyable activity. It’s perfect for the little ones. Pack a hat, sunscreen, and lots of water for the trip. Best of luck on your hike. Is there anyone who knows if this route is still accessible, despite the fact that the park has declared it closed?

  • Is it still possible to access this trail?
  • Do you enjoy surprising yourself and the people that come to your house to visit?
  • It is easily accessible and has a temperate climate.
  • This was completed exactly one year ago today.
  • Both of my parents were able to complete the task without difficulty as well (mom was having some orthopedic issues).
  • It was a pleasure to go through the slot canyon.
  • There was no line to enter into the slot canyon this morning; it was pleasant and chilly, with a few patches of snow remaining in the deeper shaded areas.

The actual slot itself is an easy/moderate trek; once you’ve gotten out of the slot, it’s a series of switchbacks up to the summit, where you’ll be rewarded with spectacular views of the monument and the surrounding landscape.

This trek is very unique!

Although there is some height increase, it is definitely worth it to reach the summit.

Please be advised that this route is not dog friendly!

It would be difficult to find a more intriguing and unusual trek than this one.

There are some sections of the Canyon route that are pretty tight.

The tent rocks are a short and easy trek.

There are several makeshift nature steps that were clearly installed by the parks administration.

The views from the summit are spectacular.

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike, New Mexico

A area of magnificent and strange rock formations, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is located in the southern foothills of the Jemez Mountains, near Cochiti Pueblo, in the state of New Mexico. The monument has also served as an official national monument, overseen by the Bureau of Land Management, since its designation in 2001. The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike is an exhilarating outdoor excursion. It provides an opportunity to view the unusual geological structure known as Tent Rocks.

It is considered to be one of the most beautiful treks in New Mexico.

Kasha-Katuwe is a Swahili word that means “white cliffs.” In addition, it is a sacred spot for the Cochiti Pueblo’s religious practices.

As a result, in this post, we provide you with all of the necessary information to help you prepare for this great experience, which is the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike. It is possible that this post contains affiliate or paid links. Please refer to ourdisclaimerfor more detailed information.

What is Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument?

Located atop the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico, between 5570 and 6760 feet above sea level, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a popular tourist destination. The cone-shaped tent rock formations are the result of volcanic eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago and produced deposits of pumice, ash, and tuff that were more than 1,000 feet deep in some places, including the Grand Canyon. Massive explosions from the Jemez volcanic field hurled rock pieces into the air, while scorching hot gases erupted down slopes, causing a pyroclastic flow, which is an incandescent avalanche that engulfed the area.

  1. Following regular layering of volcanic material, the cliff face is interlaced with bands of grey rock intermingled with beige and pink-colored rock throughout its length.
  2. Finally, it was shaping inner ravines into smooth semicircles, which was a satisfying feeling.
  3. TRAVEL TIP: It was closed for many months as a result of the COVID-19 epidemic.
  4. The Bureau of Land Management is in charge of its administration (BLM).
  5. Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a popular hiking location between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, and is accessible by car or on foot.
  6. If you go on a Tent Rocks trek, you will also pass through a slot canyon and up onto a mesa, which will provide you with spectacular views of the Sangre de Cristo and Jemez Mountains.

Where is Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument?

Located on the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico, between 5570 and 6760 feet above sea level, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a geological wonder of the American Southwest. Vulcanic eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago generated pumice, ash, and tuff deposits that were more than 1,000 feet deep. These cone-shaped tent rock formations are the result of these eruptions. Great explosions from the Jemez volcanic field hurled rock pieces into the air, while scorching hot gases spilled down slopes, causing a pyroclastic flow, which means “incandescent avalanche.” Tent Rocks are also different in height, ranging from a few feet to as high as 90 feet.

  • Wind and water have carved into these deposits throughout time, resulting in the formation of characteristic pointed hoodoos and the sinuous slot canyon.
  • Before you travel, check the official website to see if the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is open.
  • President Bill Clinton designated the site as a National Monument of the United States of America in 2001.
  • Hiking, birding, geological observation, and plant identification are all possible activities at the Kasha-Katuwe National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Only those on foot should use hiking routes.

You’ll also get to see the Sangre de Cristo and Jemez Mountains from above if you do the Tent Rocks trek, which includes a slot canyon and a climb up onto a mesa. In conclusion, if you’re seeking for one of the most beautiful walks in New Mexico, consider the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks hike.

Directions To Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks

From Santa Fe, you should take I-25 south for a few miles. Take the Cochiti Pueblo Exit 264 off of Interstate 25 and turn right onto NM 16. Follow signs to Cochiti Pueblo and the National Monument after taking a right off NM 16 into NM 22. It takes around 50 minutes to drive there. Accommodations in Santa Fe may be seen on the map below. Booking.com

Directions from Albuquerque

From Albuquerque, you must take I-25 north to reach Santa Fe. Take the Santo Domingo/Cochiti Lake Recreation Area exit (Exit 259) off Interstate 25 and merge into NM 22. Continue on NM 22 to Cochiti Pueblo and Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, where you will see signs directing you there. It takes around one hour to drive from Albuquerque. Accommodations in Albuquerque can be found in the section below. Booking.com The following are some of our favorite maps and books on New Mexico:

Map: Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Moon New Mexico Travel Guide Explorer’s Guide New Mexico Scenic Driving New Mexico Most Spectacular Back Roads
View Item View Item View Item View Item

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument – Hours of Operation

Before you visit Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike, you should be aware that the trail’s operating hours are limited. As a result, schedule your time appropriately. Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is only open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. At 3:30 pm, closure processes commence, and visitors must exit the fee booth guarded area before closing time. It is only open for daytime usage. There is no campsite in the park, and rustic camping is not permitted. Dogs are not permitted on the grounds of the Monument.

Furthermore, the site is closed on a number of days throughout the year to accommodate traditional observances of the Pueblo de Cochiti.

  • New Year’s Day, January 6, Friday before Easter, Easter Sunday, Monday after Easter, May 3, July 13-14, July 25, November 1, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day

If Pueblos, the Native American community in New Mexico, piques your curiosity, read on. Check out our article about the world-famous Taos Pueblo.

Entrance Fee to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

Private automobiles are $5; groups of up to 25 people are $25; and buses are $5. Groups of 25-100 people – $100 per group On weekends, parking lots might become full, so arriving early is recommended to ensure a parking place. Please be patient with the gate attendants. They will not let you in unless there is a parking place available for you to park in. Restrooms and picnic tables are available on the parking lot’s grounds. Our best hiking guides are as follows:

Hiking New Mexico Greatest Hiking Hiking New Mexico 50 Hikes in Northern New Mexico 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles New Mexico
View Item View Item View Item View Item

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike

Two short paths are included inside the Kasha-Katuwe National Monument. The Cave Loop Trail is 1.2 miles long and is a moderately difficult hike. The Slot Canyon Trail is the second and greatest walks in New Mexico, yet it is also one of the most difficult. The hike is known as the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike. The Slot Canyon Trail and Cave Loop Trail may be accessed from a single trailhead. As a result, head straight for the Slot Canyon. And, if you have time, you may include the Cave Loop Trail at the conclusion of your hike when you return.

The Slot Canyon Trail is a 2.8-mile, one-way trip through a tight canyon with a steep (630-foot) ascent to the mesa’s summit at the end of the trail.

During periods of severe rainfall, however, there is a risk of flooding in the canyon. So be sure to check the weather forecast before you leave. If there is any threat of flash floods in the slot canyon, especially during the monsoon season, avoid hiking there (mid-June to mid-September).

How Long Does It Take To Hike Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks?

There are two short paths in the Kasha-Katuwe National Monument. Trail length is 1.2 miles, and it has a moderate difficulty. Situated in New Mexico’s Slot Canyon Trail, the second and greatest trek in the state. Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike is the name of the trail. To access the Slot Canyon Trail and Cave Loop Trail, you must go via a single trailhead parking area. Go directly to the Slot Canyon, if at all possible. Add Cave Loop Trail to your itinerary at the conclusion of your trip if you have the opportunity on your return.

One-way Slot Canyon Trail is approximately 2.8 miles in length and leads to the mesa’s summit through a steep (630-foot) ascent.

It should be noted that during periods of severe rain, the canyon may flood.

Please refrain from hiking in the slot canyon if there is any threat of flash flooding, especially during the monsoon season (mid-June to mid-September).

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike Description

In the first part of the path, you’ll be winding your way through a lush slot canyon. Beautiful examples of rock layers, hoodoos, and the impacts of wind and water may be found in the slot. It’s so little that you can almost touch the walls on either side of it. Furthermore, you may be required to walk sideways. The chilly and wet walls, as well as their smooth surfaces, may be felt. When you glance up, you will notice that Tent Rocks has the appearance of a rocket. The powers of water and wind have continued to carve hoodoos into the cliffs for thousands of years.

The trail continues beyond the slot canyon.

The route is located at the bottom of the wash and seems to be a tunnel.

Climbing To The Mesa Top

The trail ascends 640 feet in switchbacks to the plateau. After 1.1 miles, the trail takes a left and passes beneath some of the most impressive rock formations. It is behind the conical hoodoos, which stand 90 feet tall and give this National Monument its name, that the canyon begins to open. There is some scrambling necessary at times as the route ascends sharply on a brittle, crumbling surface to begin. Just before mile 2, there is a lookout point where you may take in the scenery. The route continues to rise higher and higher, leading out of the canyon on the other side.

See also:  Who Did The Weasleys Borrow Their Tent From

It provides a spectacular perspective of the canyon and the rock formations that surround it.

The route continues up and then down the canyon wall, where it meets the river.

It’s worthwhile to work your way to the top.

From the plateau, the white cliffs are a sight to see. From the summit of the mesa, you can see the slot canyon and Tent Rocks, as well as panoramic views of the Rio Grande River Valley to the east and the Jemez Mountains to the west. The slot canyon and Tent Rocks are particularly impressive.

Return via The Cave Loop Trail

Return the same way you came, but turn right at the fork in the Cave Loop Trail to continue straight. It connects to the Slot Canyon Trail at a fork in the road. On the way back, it’s a simple and short track to follow. The Cave Loop Trail is a moderately level trail that offers beautiful vistas. The route is clearly designated, with various cautions about snakes, the need of keeping on the track, and the prohibition on rock gathering among them.

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Weather

When is the best time to visit Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument? The ideal time to visit is between May and September. We went on the Tent Rocks walk in December of this year. It was chilly but bright, and the weather was ideal for going for a stroll. You should bring plenty of water if you are travelling during the hot months. Because the slot canyon has some shade, you should bring a warm jacket with you. The monsoon season lasts from the middle of June until the middle of September.

Because it is a slot canyon, it is subject to flooding.

What To Bring For Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Hike?

The ideal time to visit Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is between the months of June and September. In December of this year, we hiked the Tent Rocks. I went for a stroll on a brisk but sunny day that was great for me. If you’re travelling during the summer, make sure you bring plenty of water. Take a thick jacket with you because there is some shade in the slot canyon. Generally speaking, the monsoon season runs from the middle of June through the middle of September. In order to avoid being caught in flash floods, always check the weather/weather prediction before you travel.

Temperature and precipitation averages for Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument have been compiled in the charts below.

Water is most important even during short hikes, so bring a sufficient amount of water, and extra water in case of emergency. Always carry a water treatment method, f.e. tablets. Check before the hike if there any water sources on the trail. The best idea is to take alight water reservoir.
Take a salty snack, as highenergy protein barsandbeef jerkyor other high – calorie meals, as nuts and sandwiches. Always take extra portions.
Always take a < rel="noopener nofollow noreferrer" target="_blank"> trail map. You can use App with your hike, but remember that there is no coverage often on the trails, so you should have printed maps too.
GPS watchor GPS device allows you to find your location on a digital map accurately. They are waterproof and robust. Another option is to use a smartphone with a GPS app, but often there is no connection on the trails. If you have a phone, remember not to use its battery. Finally, monitor your battery power.
First aid kitwith blister care, duct tape. It will help you handle unexpected moments (includes CPR Mask, Bandaids, Blanket, Tourniquet and more)
Headlap or flashlight with spare batteries. Yes, we take it with us even if the hike is lasting only a few hours during the day. A long time ago we lost during the day and then we had to come back through the wilderness at night. You never know what will happen, that’s why we always haveheadlampwith us.
Extra Clothes. Even for short hikes, we dress in layers. We always have hightrekking shoeswith reliable traction, and we usetrekking poles, too. But we always put it in the backpack extra clothes beyond those required for the trip. We add awarm hoodie,raincoat, gloves, a hat, and socks,in case of weather breakdown.
Emergency sleeping bag, which serves as your emergency blanket, survival shelter, and emergency bivy sack all-in-one.
Fire Starter, because in case of an emergency, you need to have reliable supplies with you for starting and maintaining a fire.
Emergency Whistlesis must-have, too. Battery in the cellphone will run down, or there will be no coverage on the trail, and this is the only way you can call for help.
Sun protection. Always pack with you and wearsunglasses,sun-protection hatandsunscreen.
Always carry some type ofemergency shelterto protect you from wind and rain in case you get stranded or injured on the trail.

Information was obtained from the following sources:

Quick Answer: Is Tent Rocks Trail Open

Information was obtained from the following resources:

Is tent rocks open for hiking?

The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument in New Mexico is one of the rare outdoor locations that is still inaccessible to the public. As a result of the epidemic, the monument has been closed for more than a year, and the Bureau of Land Management, which owns the monument, is taking advantage of the downtime by making some adjustments to the popular site.

Is the Cochiti Pueblo open?

The Cochiti Visitor Center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday. Call the Cochiti Visitor Center at 505-465-8535 for further information.

Can you see tent rocks by car?

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday; 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday; Cochiti Visitor Center is closed on Sunday and Monday through Thursday. For more information, call 505-465-8535 or visit their website.

Is Tent Rocks Open 2021?

Update as of July 9, 2021: Public access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is presently unavailable due to inclement weather.

During the closure, the Bureau of Land Management has had the chance to work on improvements that will improve the visitor experience when the park reopens. Trails are being upgraded as part of the project to relieve safety issues within the monument.

Where is the tent rocks located?

Located in the foothills of the Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico, United States, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a geologically unusual series of rock formations. It is approximately 25 miles (40 km) southwest of the city of Santa Fe.

How do you find Tent Rocks?

Located in the foothills of the Jemez Mountains in north-central New Mexico, United States, Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a geologically unusual series of rock formations that is approximately 25 miles (40 km) southwest of Santa Fe and is designated as a National Monument.

Where is Slot Canyon NM?

Trailhead for Slot Canyon is a 2.5-mile, moderately frequented circle path situated in Las Cruces, New Mexico, that provides opportunities to observe animals and is suitable for hikers of all ability levels. The trail is generally utilized for hiking and nature visits, but it may also be used for other activities.

How did Tent Rocks form?

During volcanic eruptions from the Jemez volcanic field that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago, the cone-shaped tent rock developed out of pumice, ash, and tuff layers over 1,000 feet thick that escaped. In as a result, the tent rocks cones have soft pumice and tuff cores behind tougher caprocks, resulting in cores that are mushy to the touch.

What language does Cochiti Pueblo speak?

The Cochiti are native speakers of Keres, an eastern Keresan language that is considered a linguistic isolation by the United Nations.

How old is the Cochiti Pueblo?

The Cochiti people are believed to be descended from the Anasazi people, who resided near Frijoles Canyon at the time of their emergence. Sometime approximately 1250AD, they made their way to this location. The Cochiti Pueblo did not get many visits from the Spanish until after 1581, which was around 40 years later than the majority of other pueblos.

Are dogs allowed at Slot Canyon?

Huntress Slot Canyon was recommended to us by the BLM office in Kanab, and while it was incredibly dog-friendly, there was only one spot where I could reach out and touch both sides of the canyon with my arms stretched to their maximum length. It was a very gorgeous little trek, although we had hoped for something a bit narrower.

Does New Mexico have sand dunes?

There is no other place like it on the planet. One of the world’s great natural wonders – the shimmering white sands of New Mexico – rises from the depths of the Tularosa Basin to the surface of the earth. In the desert of southern Arizona, great wave-like dunes of gypsum sand have enveloped more than 275 square miles, forming what is believed to be the world’s biggest gypsum dunesfield.

What county is Tent Rocks in?

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is located in Sandoval County. Display a map of the state of New Mexico. Display a map of the United States of America. Display all of the locations Sandoval County is located in the state of New Mexico in the United States. The closest city is Cochiti Pueblo, New Mexico. The location is 35°39′37′′N 106°24′30′′WC. The location’s coordinates are 35°39′37′′N 106°24′30′′W.

Is Cochiti Lake Open 2021?

ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico — The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Albuquerque District stated on December 21, 2020, that Cochiti Lake would return for day usage on January 4, 2021, following a lengthy closure.

How long is the slot canyon hike?

Located in Borrego Springs, California, The Slot is a 2.3-mile widely frequented circle route that features spectacular wildflowers and is categorized as moderate in difficulty. It is recommended to utilize the path for hiking from September to May, as it is mostly used for that purpose.

How far is Slot Canyon from Las Cruces NM?

Information about the location: Slot Canyon is approximately a 2.5-mile round trip hike located around 20 miles north of Las Cruces. Please keep in mind that you will need a state recreational access permit in order to access this walk. Directions: To get to N Valley Dr North, use NM-185 North for approximately 19.5 miles. The trailhead is on the west side of the road, accessible through a dirt road.

What is a Class C Canyon?

Information about the location: Slot Canyon is approximately a 2.5-mile round trip hike that begins and ends in Las Cruces. This trek is only accessible with the assistance of a state recreational access permit. Directions: For about 19.5 miles, follow NM-185 N/N Valley Dr North. The trailhead is on the west side of the road, accessible through a dirt path.

When was tent rocks formed?

Information about the location: Slot Canyon is a 2.5-mile out-and-back hike located approximately 20 miles north of Las Cruces. Please keep in mind that you will need a state recreational access permit to access this climb. Directions: Continue north on NM-185 N/N Valley Dr for approximately 19.5 miles. The trailhead is located on the west side of the road.

What did the Cochiti tribe eat?

Diet Cochitis was a family of farmers. Prior to the arrival of the Spaniards, they subsisted mostly on maize, beans, and pumpkins. They also planted sunflowers and tobacco on their property. They preyed on deer, mountain lions, bears, antelope, and rabbits, among other game.

What is Cochiti Pueblo known for?

The Cochiti are well-known for their mastery of the art of jewelry creation, pottery production, and drum making. Near the San Buenaventura de Cochiti Mission Church, which was built in 1628, during particular events, and at Cochiti Lake, visitors are encouraged to stop by.

How many villages make up Laguna Pueblo?

Their jewelry, ceramics, and drums, among other things, are highly regarded for their workmanship. At the San Buenaventura de Cochiti Mission Church, which was built in 1628, during specific rituals, and at Cochiti Lake, visitors are encouraged to participate.

Who is the governor of Cochiti Pueblo?

The Cochiti are well-known for their mastery of the art, which includes jewelry, ceramics, and drums. Visitors are welcome at the San Buenaventura de Cochiti Mission Church, which was built in 1628, as well as for select rituals at Cochiti Lake.

Any news on when Tent Rocks might reopen – Santa Fe Forum

4.Re: Is there any word on when Tent Rocks could reopen?13 years ago I would suggest any of the walks inside Bandelier National Monument as being excellent. Particularly noteworthy are the Falls Trail, the Tsankawiunit, and the Valles Caldera, which lies beyond Bandelier to the west. The Valles Caldera is a 20-mile-wide crater left behind from what must have been a catastrophic eruption that altered the course of history. Several walks provide an excellent perspective of the caldera’s vast extent, which is just amazing in its sheer size and magnitude.

This walk will take you down to the Rio Grande’s banks and will take you past some interesting landforms and lava flow remnants on its way there.

Slot canyons aren’t as common in this area as they are in areas like Utah, but the ones at Tent Rocks, which are close by, are the most intriguing and easily accessible.

I would advise staying away from the main loop path in Hyde Park State Park just because it appears to be a favorite track for locals who like to let their dogs run free in the park. It’s great for them, but it’s not so great for people wishing to see some wildlife or go birding.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *