What Is The Blue Tent On Nfl Sidelines

Here is what is going inside the NFL’s blue medical tent – The Boston Globe

THE GARDEN CITY OF MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — The blue medical tent that can be seen on each NFL sideline is a location that no player wants to visit, but everyone else would want to steal a peak inside for a closer look. Yes, it is a simple pop-up tent that is fixed to the ground by a metal rectangular frame that is centered around an exam table. Anyone may draw the tent into position and individuals can go inside, away from prying eyes, if they feel a player is suffering from concussion or an ailment that requires some solitude.

Before Sunday’s Super Bowl, Sills and Jeff Miller, the NFL’s executive vice president of health and safety innovation, provided reporters with an inside look at how the league handles concussions and other injuries during each game — whether it’s in the preseason, regular season, or postseason — prior to the game.

The video booth has the capacity to rewind and freeze film, allowing medical experts to see a player whose ailment could have gone unnoticed on the field.

A team physician, a non-affiliated neuro-trauma consultant (if a concussion evaluation is being performed), and a team trainer surround the player as soon as the tent is deployed.

  • In the midst of thousands of people and the chaos of a football game, the tent affords a little bit of seclusion.
  • The ability to concentrate on the subject at hand, says Sills, helps everyone within the tent to be more productive.
  • “Don’t we all agree that the stadium is a visually distracting environment?
  • As a result, we are able to have a more thorough examination than we might obtain outdoors.” The NFL also has TV monitors on each sideline, each of which is equipped with an Xbox controller that can be used to oversee replays and freeze games.
  • The tent can also be used to treat other types of injuries, although it is not essential to do so.
  • In the event that they need to re-tape an injured groin or do anything similar, or in the event that a player is emotionally distraught and they want to inspect him in private.
  • Kendall Fuller, the Kansas City Chiefs’ cornerback, is relieved that he has never been inside the tent himself, and he was concerned for a brief time that a query about the tent would be a jinx.

Injuries are something that players would rather not worry about. When you’re hurt, having a little privacy can help. “You never know what kind of injury someone is dealing with,” Fuller explained. “It’s obviously beneficial for them to be able to have some privacy.”

Why are NFL teams using those pop-up medical tents on their sidelines?

The National Football League is exploring a novel technique to diagnosing injuries on the field, including concussions, and it will take up some valuable real estate on the field level. Throughout the 2017 season, the league will build collapsible, portable medical tents on the sidelines of each team’s practice facility, providing physicians and training personnel with a level of privacy and quiet when assessing players. These tents will be visible from the stands since they are large enough to accommodate a training table, the injured player, and all of the physicians and staff workers need to conduct a thorough examination.

During the Seahawks-Packers game, Cliff Avril walked inside the tent with his teammates.

This type of assessment was formerly carried out in full view of the crowds and media cameras on the sidelines of the stadium.

As the NFL’s chief medical officer explained to the Washington Post, “all of our sideline concussion evaluations will take place inside the tents, which we believe will not only provide more privacy, dignity, and comfort for the player, but will also eliminate some of the visual and auditory distractions that are important to obtaining the best concussion evaluation we can,” he added.

  1. The locker room will still be necessary to be visited by players who match specific requirements, in order to conduct additional testing and diagnoses.
  2. As a result, it will provide a more conducive atmosphere for physicians to evaluate whether a player may return to the field or whether more monitoring is required.
  3. Alabama was a pioneer in the creation of private examination areas, employing their own tent during the 2015 season and even taking it to the College Football Playoff National Championship Game in New York City.
  4. The tents made their NFL debut at the 2017 Hall of Fame Game, which took place between the Arizona Cardinals and the Dallas Cowboys in Arlington, Texas.

According to Commissioner Roger Goodell, “it provides a chance for us to have a better inspection because it will protect privacy for a short period of time, allowing doctors to go ahead and make the necessary diagnosis.” Despite the fact that these tents will not be able to cure the league’s concussion issue, they will assist physicians and workers while also giving players with the dignity of an examination away from prying eyes.

Early diagnosis is critical in preventing future injuries that can ruin careers and sometimes entire lives from occurring.

Even a tiny move in the correct direction is better than no step at all. An setting with fewer distractions and greater leeway for on-the-spot evaluations is a positive development.

This is what it’s like inside the NFL’s mysterious sideline medical tent

MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. (AP) – The Miami Gardens is a popular tourist destination. The blue medical tent that can be seen on each NFL sideline is a location that no player wants to visit, but everyone else would want to steal a peak inside for a closer look. Yes, it is a simple pop-up tent that is fixed to the ground by a metal rectangular frame that is centered around an exam table. Anyone may draw the tent into position and individuals can go inside, away from prying eyes, if they feel a player is suffering from concussion or an ailment that requires some solitude.

Before Sunday’s Super Bowl, Sills and Jeff Miller, the NFL’s executive vice president of health and safety innovation, provided reporters with an inside look at how the league handles concussions and other injuries during each game — whether it’s in the preseason, regular season, or postseason — prior to the game.

  1. The video booth has the capacity to rewind and freeze film, allowing medical experts to see a player whose ailment could have gone unnoticed on the field.
  2. It’s possible for four people to be comfortably accommodated in this space, according to Sills.
  3. Not for competitive reasons, but rather to make a smaller version of a doctor’s exam room for privacy purposes, even if the walls are made of polyethylene plastic.
  4. “I require visual contact and visual focus from the player throughout an examination,” Sills explained.
  5. You’ve got video boards and exploding pyrotechnics and plenty of movement, so you can actually concentrate and get a bit more visual concentration within here.
  6. Only medical staff are permitted to use the monitors in order to check for concussions and other head ailments.
  7. It’s possible to see them come into the office sometimes to inspect a sensitive bodily region, Sills explained.
  8. While it is optional for other types of injuries, it is required for all concussion examinations.

Injuries are something that players would rather not worry about. When you’re hurt, having a little privacy can help. “You never know what kind of injury someone is dealing with,” Fuller explained. “It’s obviously beneficial for them to be able to have some privacy.”

Exactly What Happens Inside the NFL’s Pop-Up Medical Tents

Fans who have been following the NFL since 2017 may have noticed an unusual pop-up tent that moves around the sidelines of every game they watch. These blue tents are not intended to provide shade, but rather to allow wounded players to get urgent medical attention. Professionals who can provide fast medical treatments are housed on the second floor. Taking a look inside these tents demonstrates just how vital they may be for player safety, as well as what they are capable of and are not capable of.

Why are the blue tents there?

The following attributes are allowed: ” src=” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; picture-in-picture; picture-in-picture;” allowfullscreen=””> For NFL clubs, the tents are used for a number of purposes. The fact that they are contained is not just for the purpose of keeping fans and journalists out, but also to assist the athletes. The tents make it easier for the players to put on a performance. They can also be used in a practical setting.

The use of portable medical tents reduces the issues associated with several bench-based treatments and testing, and they assist crews and players in doing these tasks in a timely and effective manner.

What happens inside the medical tents?

The following attributes are allowed: ” src=” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; picture-in-picture; picture-in-picture;” allowfullscreen=””> In many cases, these tents are shown as a type of hidden realm. The athletes and medical personnel are able to work more secretly in these shelters, whereas fans frequently read lips and comment on injuries in public. Everyone can work uninterrupted because the tents are so near but still closed off, avoiding the need to use the restroom or walk to the concession stand.

The tent is instead transported to the athlete, who is seated on a medical bench adjacent to the field.

They will then determine if the athlete may return to the game or whether he or she will need to return to the locker room for additional treatment.

By removing the outer environment from their responses, a player may concentrate on their responses, which helps to reduce the likelihood of incorrect outcomes.

The pop-up medical tents’ benefits and limits

The following attributes are allowed: ” src=” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; picture-in-picture; picture-in-picture;” allowfullscreen=””> Before using these tents, the NFL made certain that all of its trainers and medical personnel received thorough training in not just good treatment within the tent but also in the understanding of what can and cannot be done by the tent after it was set up.

Serious injuries cannot be treated within the tent, although doctors can conduct preliminary tests and observations there while waiting.

They will be able to rejoin the game immediately if they have been cleared to do so.

Although the NFL has a long way to go when it comes to safety procedures and injuries, it has introduced several improvements, like as the tent, that have reduced the number of life-threatening situations that have occurred as a result of inadequate treatment or facilities.

Although the tents are far from ideal, every extra step the NFL takes to ensure the safety of its players is a great development.

Medical Examination Tents to Improve Injury Evaluations on NFL Sidelines

In addition to new rule changes intended to promote player health and safety, medical examination tents will be available on NFL sidelines throughout the 2018 season, according to the league. The tiny, portable tents may be used to allow physicians and trainers to examine athletes in solitude if they have sustained an injury. When the NFL League Meeting convened in May, Commissioner Roger Goodell announced the decision to modify. Because it will provide privacy for a limited amount of time, “it provides a chance for us to have a better examination,” Goodell explained.

Allen Sills, the league’s new Chief Medical Officer, also provided an update on the medical exam tents and other health and safety measures to the owners.

Sills believes that the sideline medical tent will improve treatment for our players.

Tent Training for Sideline Care

Teams’ physicians, lead team athletic trainers, unaffiliated neurotrauma consultants, and booth ATC spotters will all get summer medical training in New York City, according to the NFL. A seminar on how to operate the tent will be held as part of the training, which will be integrated into the new Game Day Concussion Protocol. A training film was also distributed to the medical personnel of each of the 32 teams. Doctor Sills explained that the medical tent is not intended to take the place of locker room evaluations, but rather to give a more private and structured environment in which to do assessments of a range of ailments that are typically performed on the sidelines.

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From College to the Pros

In 2015, the University of Alabama became the first institution to deploy medical examination tents. Jeff Allen, the school’s head sports trainer, collaborated with two University of Alabama engineering students to build them. In the next year, they founded a firm, Kinematic Sports, to distribute the tents to other football programs. Presently, SidelineER tents are utilized by over 70 college, high school, and professional football teams across the world. Aside from gymnastics, basketball, golf, lacrosse, rugby, soccer, and track and field, they’ve been utilized in a variety of other sports as well.

In just a few minutes, each item may be put together without the use of any additional equipment.

Teams in the National Football League will be obliged to place tents either within or close to their bench areas during games. They’ll make their first appearances on the sidelines during the 2017 preseason games, which will include the Hall of Fame game, this season.

A 21st Century Sideline

The NFL has made changes to the sidelines in order to better safeguard players. On average, 30 healthcare practitioners are present at a stadium on game day to give emergency care to those in need. In collaboration with the NFL Players Association, the league has increased the number of unaffiliated medical staff on the field and implemented new technologies to aid in the diagnosis and assessment of injuries, with a particular emphasis on concussions. Tablet computers with particularly tailored software for injury diagnostics are now available as sideline medical equipment.

More information about NFL sideline medical treatment and technology may be found here.

Question: Why Sideline Tent In Nfl Is Blue

The NFL installed a concussion tent on each sideline three years ago to protect players from head injuries. In the midst of thousands of people and the chaos of a football game, the tent affords a little bit of seclusion. Not for competitive reasons, but rather to make a smaller version of a doctor’s exam room for privacy purposes, even if the walls are made of polyethylene plastic.

Why is there a blue tent on NFL sidelines?

A concussion tent on each sideline was first deployed by the NFL three years ago. Even though thousands of people are around and the atmosphere is chaotic, being in the tent gives some seclusion. Not for competitive reasons, but rather to make a smaller version of a doctor’s exam room for privacy purposes, even though the walls are made of polyurethane plastic.

Who invented the sideline medical tent?

The folding sideline workstation, which is now known as SidelinER, was developed by University of Arizona sports medicine director Jeff Allen and four mechanical engineering students. Bryant-Denny Stadium hosted the inaugural game in 2015.

How much was the NFL concussion settlement?

The folding sideline workstation, which is now known as SidelinER, was developed by University of Arizona sports medicine director Jeff Allen and four mechanical engineering undergraduate students. Bryant-Denny Stadium hosted the first game in 2015.

What are medical tents made of?

Materials that are long-lasting Typically, these tents are constructed of lightweight aluminum foundations that are capable of withstanding pressure over an extended period of time. When it comes to the tent covering, you will frequently come across polyethylene materials that are utilized in the manufacturing of shelters, as well as those that are used for medicinal purposes.

How many concussions do NFL players get?

It was still 20.3 percent fewer than the total number of reported concussions (281) from the previous season, which was recorded in 2017. NFL clubs reported a decrease in the number of reported concussions during practices in both the preseason and regular season, from 53 in 2018 to 39 in 2019.

Who invented the injury tent?

Jeff Allen, the chief athletic trainer for the Alabama football team, was looking for a solution to make sideline medical assistance during games more discreet.

In response to that concept and Allen’s collaboration with two Alabama engineering students – Jace Cassity and Patrick Powell – the medical-evaluation tent was created in 2008.

How long are football players out for a concussion?

They discovered that players who sustained a concussion returned to play an average of 19 days later, which translates to an average of 1.5 games missed per player. According to data collected between 1996 and 2001, NFL players were only out for six or less days following a concussion on the field.

What is a concussion test?

Concussion testing evaluates your brain function both before and after a traumatic brain injury. Doctors or other health-care professionals who are experienced in diagnosing and treating persons who have had concussions perform the tests on the patients in question.

How many NFL missed concussions?

The mean number of games missed as a result of a concussion was 0.99, with ranges ranging from 0 to 13 games. Quarterbacks accounted for 4% of the sample, and the mean number of plays these players averaged was 47.32, with a standard deviation of 20.04, according to the findings.

How long do you have to sit out in the NFL for a concussion?

In order to return to sports, athletes who have been diagnosed with concussions must be separated from competition for at least one day and must be cleared by a team physician before doing so.

Do concussions make you tired?

It is natural to feel more exhausted after suffering a concussion. Mental (cognitive and emotional) as well as bodily fatigue are caused by the fatigue that occurs after a concussion. Even a small amount of work might leave you feeling exhausted in the beginning. Once energy reserves have been depleted, it may take longer for the body to recover from a concussion.

What are the 5 steps of NFL concussion protocol?

The five steps are as follows: Symptom-free and able to pass baseline examinations. Exercises such as dynamic stretching and balance training are recommended. Increasing the amount of time spent practicing to simulate sporting activities. Non-contact football drills as well as position-specific drills are available.

What happens if an NFL player gets a concussion?

If a player appears to be suffering from a possible concussion, he or she must be taken from the field immediately and evaluated. Following a review of a video of the play in which the player was impacted, the NFL Team physician and an independent neurotrauma expert will do a focused neurological evaluation on the player.

What is the concussion protocol NFL?

It is mandatory that a player be taken off the field as soon as it is suspected that they may have suffered a concussion. Following a review of a video of the play in which the player was impacted, the NFL Team physician and an independent neurotrauma expert will conduct a focused neurological examination on the player.

What is a Sideliner?

A spectator during an activity is someone who does not take part in the action itself.

How long is a quarterback out for a concussion?

According to The Athletic, the average time it took for the 29 quarterbacks who sustained concussions between 2015 and 2019 to return to the field was seven days.

How long can concussion last?

Concussion healing typically takes 7 to 10 days in the majority of instances. Recovery, on the other hand, may take a little longer if you don’t get enough rest or don’t follow your doctor’s advice. Learn more about how long concussions may linger by watching this video. In addition, some patients acquire a disease known as post-concussion syndrome as a result of their concussion.

What to ask if someone has a concussion?

Ask the individual the following questions: “Can you recall anything that happened right before the impact?” Is it possible for you to recall what happened?

What route did you use to get here? Were you alone when you arrived, and if not, who accompanied you?

How much time will Patrick Mahomes miss?

But the bad news is that he’ll have to miss a large period of time as a result of this. According on the results of the surgery, the recovery period will last around 4-5 months. In order to prevent further injury, Mahomes will be need to wear a boot for at least a few of weeks.

What happens if a concussion goes untreated?

If a concussion is not treated immediately, it might result in long-term consequences. Chronic headaches, memory issues, vertigo, and post-concussion syndrome, which is characterized by headaches, dizziness, mood swings, and brain fog that can last for months or years after a concussion, are all possible sequelae of a concussion.

How does the NFL test for concussions on the sidelines?

The NFL use the “SCAT 5,” a standard concussion diagnostic test developed by the International Concussion in Sport Group and published by the American Medical Association. For all intents and purposes, it is a more thorough version of the sideline exam. While possible, the findings of this test are compared to the results of the “baseline” tests that athletes undergo during the preseason when they are healthy.

How do eyes check for concussion?

Following the exclusion of more serious brain injuries, the diagnosis of concussion can be established. To diagnose severe kinds of brain damage, medical experts have long employed the pupillary light reflex (typically in the form of a penlight test, in which they flash a light into a patient’s eyes) to examine their patients.

How long can a mild concussion last?

Concussion can be diagnosed after other more serious brain injuries have been ruled out. To diagnose severe kinds of brain damage, medical experts have long utilized the pupillary light reflex (typically in the form of a penlight test, in which they flash a light into a patient’s eyes).

How much does a medical tent cost?

Prices start at $2,479 USD. A 5X10 quick-deploy medical tent that is excellent for temperature check stations and individual triage tents can be set up in minutes. Yes. In addition to the standard fee, custom printing is an extra expense.

What are the NFL concussion questions?

The Maddocks questions are used in the NFL, as well as many other sports, to help determine whether or not a player has suffered a concussion. It is not your name that is important. It’s about being aware of your surroundings. What kind of setting do we have here today? Which half is it at this point? Who was the last player to score in this game? What games did you get to play last week? Is it true that your team won the last game?

Sideline blue tents first stop on concussion diagnosis

Injury tents, such as this one, which was set up behind UCLA quarterback Wilton Speight in 2018, are increasingly a familiar sight on the sidelines of football matches. It enables teams to treat injured players in private on the sidelines, rather than at the hospital. The image is courtesy of Scott Varley/Digital First Media/Torrance Daily Breeze via Getty Images. Usually, at some time during an NFL game, the camera pans to the sideline and a player is seen entering a little blue tent on the field.

  • During games, this is the sole source of video that is permitted on the sidelines.
  • Because of the growing worry over concussions, the NFL demands that hits be examined after they have been replayed.
  • The blue tent area, which provides wounded sportsmen with privacy and uninterrupted space to be tested, has become a familiar sight on football sidelines, as well as a place to diagnose concussions in athletes.
  • A Microsoft Surface tablet eliminates the need for doctors and clinicians to be concerned about setting up a whole computer system.
  • While the player is beneath the blue tent, the physician must examine his pupils, as well as his coordination and his ability to speak clearly.
  • The physician may also access the player’s medical history through the use of the tablet.
  • Allen Sills, the Chief Medical Officer of the National Football League, spoke with SportTechie about the procedure ahead of a Monday night matchup between the New England Patriots and the New York Jets earlier this season.
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We want to cast a wide net in terms of screening.” Even if a player is not diagnosed with a concussion, the job is not over.

In accordance with the rules, the player is also obligated to undergo a medical examination the following day.

The player’s identity would be impossible to discern if one did not already know him.

As a result, either one of them can rule that a player is disqualified to return to the game.

In contrast to their power on the field, coaches have no authority in the tent and are not permitted to enter or disturb the exam.

Other spotters keep an eye out for potential injuries in the same way as play-by-play announcers use spotters to assist them with their calls.

Athletic trainers attentively monitor each play in a manner similar to that of the play-by-play spotters.

They also have video technicians working with them to help them.

“Communication is essential in this situation.” Each NFL game requires a minimum of 31 medical workers to be on the field.

Additionally, an airway management physician who specializes in emergency intubations is available on site.

In the event of a major injury, each stadium is equipped with its own X-ray facility as well as an Emergency Action Plan.

Sills describes the situation as “the tip of the iceberg,” adding that physicians and trainers are among those who have left the building.

In order to provide the best possible care for the participants throughout the game, “an great amount of resources is committed.” Currently enrolled as a senior sports journalism student at Arizona State University, Blake Harris

Related Articles

Subconcussive blows continue to cause harm to football players today. Researchers at Arizona State University have developed messaging to promote concussion reporting. According to a new study, traditional concussion therapy may not be beneficial. When it comes to sustaining a concussion, football takes a back seat to cycling. Playing high-impact sports in high school has been shown to cause’substantial’ alterations in the brain. The findings of conflicting studies on CTE demonstrate the necessity for more investigation.

According to a new study, brain alterations in football players might be attributed to the development of hand-eye coordination abilities.

The NFL has seen a decrease in concussion rates, with the fewest since 2014.

Inside the NFL’s Blue Tents: How Technology Is Used on Sidelines to Help Diagnose Concussions

The Injury Video Review System, which operates on a flat-screen Tru-Vu monitor and is operated by an Xbox remote, is the only video allowed on the sidelines during an NFL game. For in-game adjustments, coaches must rely on photographs, but actual replays are required as part of the league’s concussion protocol, providing the team doctor and an unaffiliated neurotrauma consultant (UNC) with more information about the mechanism of injury—that is, the potentially concussive blow that a player sustained.

  • An official from the University of North Carolina carries a Microsoft Surface tablet and evaluates the player’s symptoms, marking off boxes on an app developed by C3 Logix, which is a spinoff from the Cleveland Clinic.
  • The physician examines the athlete’s pupils, coordination, and speech, as well as asking him or her the Maddocks questions, which are a set of questions aimed to determine whether or not the athlete is confused or amnesic.
  • STERN TALK: The (Revised) Neurological Dangers of Football In a press conference on the sidelines of MetLife Stadium before last Monday’s game between the Patriots and Jets, NFL Chief Medical Officer Dr.
  • We want to cast a wide net in terms of screening.” In addition, even those who are not diagnosed with a concussion will continue to be monitored during the game, and they will be forced to have a follow-up check-up the following day due to the possibility of delayed development of symptoms.
  • The University of North Carolina and the team physician collaborate on evaluations, and either one has the exclusive authority to designate a player ineligible to return to the team.
  • When it comes to concussions, “a personality change is sometimes the sole indicator or symptom,” adds Sills.
  • The player’s identity would be impossible to discern if one did not already know him.

Increased privacy and fewer distractions are provided by the pop-up blue tent, which is significant considering how much of the concussion assessment is dependent on visual attention.

No coach is allowed to participate in the procedure or even enter the tent during the competition.

Located in a booth perched high above each NFL stadium, a second UNC monitors the action with two trained athletic trainers, who function as spotters for any injuries to players.

There are also two video technicians on the sidelines to assist with reviews, as well as a direct line to the medical personnel on the other side of the field.

“Communication is the most important thing here.” The staff in the booth can aid in directing sideline practitioners to treat players who may have sustained an injury that went undiagnosed at the playing surface.

Communication systems are triple-redundant, with headphones, team medical radios, and sideline telephone lines all functioning at the same time.

At each given NFL game, whether it be during the preseason, the regular season, or postseason, a minimum of 31 medical staff are on hand, including three UNCs (one on each sideline and one in each booth) and an airway management physician who is trained to do emergency intubations.

In addition to the road team, each road team is assigned a Visiting Team Medical Liaison who may assist in coordinating testing and exams with the local medical system.

Dr.

In order to provide the best possible care for the participants throughout the game, “an great amount of resources is committed.” Do you have a question or a comment? Do you have a story idea? Please notify us at

Pop-ups on NFL sidelines mean quick medical treatment

  • NEW YORK (AP) – New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has resigned. Is it possible for a player to get injured on the field, walk or be carried to the sideline, and then go camping? No, not at all. There are no medical procedures taking place in those blue tents that fans see sprouting up near the bench area during NFL games. And here’s something else: The concept came from those institutions, which is unusual for the professional game, which seldom replicates anything from the collegiate brand of the sport. Alabama is the state in question. During the 2017 season, the NFL ordered that tents be placed on every sideline of every stadium. Dr. Allen Sills, the league’s newly appointed chief medical officer, has previous familiarity with them from his time working Southeastern Conference games. In Sills’ words, “Alabama and Jeff Allen were actually the inspiration for the tent,” referring to the head of the Crimson Tide’s sports medical training department. “In several of their postseason games, I believe Jeff mentioned that he thought that certain invasive media was making it more difficult for him to provide proper care to his players. He saw that we needed a mechanism to perform more of a private review on the sidelines, and he proposed a solution.” After talking with specialists in the subject, Allen came up with the design for the prototype. He was looking for something compact and movable, rather than something permanent. Other schools quickly followed suit, and the practice spread. The blue tent has become a fixture at NFL games, serving primarily as a location for concussion testing and other fast medical services that do not necessitate a trip to the locker room. Saints tight end Josh Hill was sent to the hospital after a game in London in Week 4 to be evaluated for a probable concussion. According to him, “I believed it was effective.” “It provided me with privacy since I didn’t have to walk into the changing room. It was convenient and straightforward.” Hill did not return to the game after being removed. In the Titans’ defeat to the Miami Dolphins, backup quarterback Matt Cassel had the same examination. He was sacked by Kiko Alonso and landed hard on the ground, his helmet popping off in the process. The sack/fumble return resulted in a touchdown for Miami, therefore Cassel did not miss a play. I believe it is important for some players to have some privacy, especially those who have concussions and other issues, to be evaluated without everyone staring at them and having cameras in their faces, among other things, says Cassel. “The element of adding that tent to give some players some privacy, especially those guys who really do have concussions and other issues,” Cassel says. “So they just sort of draw that tent up, and there are a couple of physicians in there with them while they go through the concussion protocol with them. Ask them some questions, have them do different balance drills, and do anything else they need to accomplish. After that, they check on you to make sure you’re okay and evaluate you. If you’re fine, that’s fantastic. If you aren’t, I’m not sure what the next step would be. However, I believe it to be a positive development.” Sills believes the same way, and not just for concussion testing. Due to the absence of visual and aural distractions, such as those associated with sideline tests, it is simpler to do such evaluations — looking at attention and memory, for example — without difficulty. The tent, on the other hand, can be utilized for other ailments at the discretion of the team. A number of teams are utilizing the tent for all of the more expedient medical examinations, such as repairing cuts that do not require stitching or re-taping feet and ankles, among other things. “The tent is never intended to serve as a substitute for the dressing room,” Sills explains. “We are still performing therapies on the inside, whether it is suturing someone up or administering an IV, or performing some type of large intrusive operation.” The only things contained within the pop-up are an exam table and some first aid supplies. As many as seven medical workers, according to Sills, may be present in the tent at the same time, with two wounded players in the tent at the same time. On occasion, this may entail the services of an equipment manager. Coaches are not permitted in. Unless, of course, they suffer an injury throughout the process. Other regulations are in place, such as the fact that the tent cannot be heated or cooled, and that it may only be used for rapid injury evaluations. Cassel acknowledges that it was really hot inside. ‘At that time, all you’re concerned about is making sure you’re okay and that you’re not suffering from a concussion,’ he explains. “It’s less about the weather and more about making sure you’re okay.” Over the course of the season’s first month, the blue tents were utilized 170 times, with an average testing time of three minutes each testing session. Advertising is one thing that Sills does not expect we will see on the pop-ups, according to him. When compared to the numerous Gatorade tables and Microsoft Surface tablets on hand, the NFL considers the tents to be medical examination rooms rather than team equipment, which may appear strange at first. However, this is not the case in college football, where logos of the school or conference, as well as ads for nearby hospitals or health-care clinics, may be prominently displayed. Sills also predicts that other sports will adopt the approach, and he points out that it has military and security implications as well as other uses. Cassel has made up his mind about it. As far as he’s concerned, “they did a fantastic job of simply making sure they examined me and made sure I was all right.” “I passed all of the exams and was permitted to return to the field.” _AP Pro Football (American Professional Football) Teresa M. Walker, a writer, and Brett Martel, a sports writer, both contributed to this article. More NFL content may be found at: and
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Here’s how the NFL tested Jacoby Brissett for a concussion inside that blue sideline tent

Jacoby Brissett of the Indianapolis Colts was guided to a blue pop-up tent on the sideline after he was knocked out of the game by a blow to the head against the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday. This year’s NFL season marks the first time that a tent has been mandated, and every club is expected to have one. Doctors use it to do fast concussion examinations in private, away from distractions like as spectators, game activity, cameras, lighting, and other sources of illumination. They’ve completed 379 evaluations thus far this season (and in the preseason as well).

In the beginning, it was developed and implemented by the University of Alabama’s training department, and it is currently utilized by around 70 football teams across the country.

Here’s a high-level overview:

1. If the player shows ‘no-go’ symptoms (loss of consciousness, confusion or amnesia) he is sent to the locker room and can’t return. No sideline tests needed.

On Sunday, though, this was not the case with Brissett, who was submitted to – and passed – four consecutive concussion examinations during and after the game. According to Sills, when Brissett was hit in the head during the third quarter of the game, he was assessed by the Colts’ medical team promptly and passed their concussion evaluation. In addition to Moore, the unaffiliated neurological consultant (UNC) was in the Colts’ locker room ministering to cornerback Kenny Moore, who was also being assessed for a probable concussion.

According to Sills, the players waited until the (UNC) was accessible from the dressing room.

He had no signs or symptoms, and there were no discoveries.

2. If the player is generally not dealing with those three symptoms, he undergoes the ‘NFL Sideline Concussion Assessment’

  • However, this was not the case with Brissett on Sunday, as he was submitted to four consecutive concussion examinations during and after the game, all of which he passed. Brissett suffered a knock to the head in the third quarter, and Sills noted that the Colts’ medical team assessed him almost away, finding him to be in good health and passing their concussion assessment. In the Colts’ locker room, the unaffiliated neurological consultant (UNC) was attending to cornerback Kenny Moore, who was also being assessed for a probable concussion. The NFL contracts with independent physicians and places one on each sideline, as a courtesy to players. He explained that the team waited till the UNC was accessible from the dressing room. “The (UNC) came out and repeated the same examination in the (medical) tent with the team medical professionals and the (UNC), and the player passed that evaluation once again.” Both symptoms and results were absent in his case. At that moment, there was nothing to imply that anything was out of the ordinary.

Sills also stated that the team’s medical staff kept an eye on Brissett during the duration of the game, looking for signs of a concussion.

3. What are Maddocks’ Questions?

In 2014, the National Football League released its on-field concussion evaluation tool. Upon completion of each of the following stages, the player is granted points, which are tallied and then compared to the player’s baseline test results, which are determined before each season. David Maddocks, a researcher who devised the questions in 1995, is commemorated by the name of the questions. According to the NFL, a “player may suffer a concussion while being able to complete the NFL Sideline Concussion Evaluation ‘within normal limits’ when compared to their baseline, due to the constraints of a quick sideline assessment,” as was the situation with Brissett.

Listed below are a few of the questions that were utilized in the assessment: Assessment of Concussion in a Standardized Method (SAC)

  • What month is it, exactly? What day is it today
  • What time is it
  • What day of the week is it
  • What is the date? What year is it, exactly? What time is it at the moment

Questions from Maddocks

  • What are we doing here? Which quarter are we now in? Who was the last player to score in the practice/game
  • Who did we play in the last game
  • Did we win the previous game

Test of recollection of words A list of five words, one at a time, is read aloud to the physician throughout this part. Then they invite the player to repeat the words back to them in any sequence they want. Here are some examples of word groups: At least five minutes later, the physician will ask the player to recollect as many of the terms as they can recall in their head. Concentration test (also known as a concentration check) The physician reads a series of figures to the player and then asks him or her to repeat the numbers backwards.

For instance, 4-9-3 is a number.

As stated in the NFL’s procedure, “if, after completing the Sideline Survey, the medical staff determines that the player did not receive a concussion, then the player may return to play.”

4. Post-game analysis

  • As reported by Sills, Brissett was subjected to a second concussion test in the locker room immediately following the game, and he passed it. It wasn’t until “20 or 30 minutes later,” according to Sills, that Brissett began to show signs of “mild” flu-like illness. His performance was evaluated for the fourth time, and he passed that evaluation as well, according to Sills. “He was neurologically normal once more,” Sills reported. “However, because there were some moderate symptoms that occurred, the team determined at that moment that they would place him in the concussion protocol and treat him for the concussion diagnosis.” “Return to Practice Protocol,” as Brissett calls it, is now in effect. As Sills pointed out, “they will never be able to record 100 percent of concussions.” “It does not imply that someone did not do their responsibilities. Simply put, the art of medicine and the science of medicine are not without flaws,” says the author. Dakota Crawford, a sports producer for IndyStar, may be found on Twitter under the handle @DakotaCrawford. According to the NFL, the Seahawks violated the league’s concussion protocol. According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, the Seattle Seahawks broke the NFL’s concussion protocol on Thursday night when quarterback Russell Wilson was permitted to return to the game without being properly checked out after being knocked out. Time Sports

Alabama receives patent for sideline medical tent

ALABAMA Adam Spencer| 4 years ago | No comments Recent years have seen an increase in the number of sideline medical tents appearing throughout the football field – both at the collegiate and professional levels. The Alabama Crimson Tide may take credit for this, as they were the ones who pioneered the usage of tents in college football back in 2015. According to AL.com, the tents have now been patented by the university, which was published on Monday morning: The folding sideline workstation, which is now known as SidelinER, was developed by University of Arizona sports medicine director Jeff Allen and four mechanical engineering students.

The next year, the university licensed the technology to Kinematic Sports, a firm founded by Allen and two of the students who worked on the research, Jacqueline Cassity and Patrick Powell, who went on to become entrepreneurs.

For the time being, though, the Crimson Tide will continue to rely on the buildings on their sidelines to provide wounded players with some level of seclusion.

SidelinER PRO 7′ x 14′ and SidelinER Pro 5′ x 12′

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  • Sideline medical tents that provide seclusion for wounded athletes and their accompanying medical professionals in the case of an emergency during games, meetings, events, or even practices are available. We are happy to be the exclusive distributor of SidelinER tents in the United States, and each SidelinER tent is manufactured in the United States. As an added bonus, utilize our tents as a chance to demonstrate school spirit while also generating cash through sponsorship of our personalized panels. Designed to be purchased by youth, high school, college, and professional teams for the purpose of private medical exams, it is also available for rental. Decide on the greatest fit for your intended usage by selecting from a selection of size, color, panel, and frame combinations.
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Brand Kinematic Sports – SidelinER

Overview

Sideline medical tents that provide seclusion for wounded athletes and their accompanying medical professionals in the case of an emergency during games, meets, events, or even practices are also available. We are happy to be the only distributor of SidelinER tents in the United States, and each SidelinER tent is manufactured in the United States; As an added bonus, utilize our tents as an opportunity to demonstrate school spirit while also generating cash via sponsorship of our personalized panels; A medical evaluation device intended to be acquired by youth sports teams (e.g., high school, college, and professional) for private medical evaluations; Decide on the best fit for your intended usage by choosing from a selection of size, color, panel, and frame combinations.

SidelinER PRO 7′ W x 14′ L (formerly 2.0)

A portable and foldable patient exam room that is specifically intended to address the demands of sporting programs with limited sideline area on the field or court. It is designed to comfortably accommodate an athlete on a table, as well as up to 6 persons inside for a performance review! Using this method, everyone on the medical team may participate in the examination while yet keeping their privacy from onlookers and media cameras. The stainless steel and aluminum frame telescopes to make transporting simple, and the tent itself can be raised and down in less than 5 seconds each way.

With this choice, you’ll get a working space of 64 square feet that measures 14.1 inches long, 6.5 inches wide, and 7 inches high.

SidelinER Pro 5′ W x 12′ L (formerly Mini)

In order to address the demands of sports programs with limited sideline area, we created a mobile and collapsible patient exam room. It is designed to comfortably accommodate an athlete on a table, as well as up to 6 persons inside for a test or evaluation session. In this way, the complete medical staff may participate in the examination while yet retaining privacy from onlookers and TV cameras. In order to make transportation easier, the stainless steel and aluminum structure is telescoped, and the tent itself can be raised and lowered in under 5 seconds.

With this choice, you’ll get a working space of 64 square feet that is 14.1 feet long, 6.5 feet wide, and 7 feet high.

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