What Is A Vestibule In A Tent

What is a Tent Vestibule? And Do You Need One? [

A Vestibule Is|Is It Necessary To Have One?|What Types Of Vestibules Are There?|Should You Have One?|Alternatives|Cooking|Pictures

What is a Tent Vestibule?

Tightly enclosed areas around the sides or front of your tent that give additional room just outside the inside of your tent but protected from the elements by a rain fly are known as tent vestibules. In order to save space, this is an excellent location to keep stuff outside the tent, to change out of muddy or damp clothing, to leave boots, or even to cook if campers are extremely cautious to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning or putting your tent on fire. Those seeking for a tent with a vestibule can check out our post on the finest budget hiking tents for the money.

Types of Tent Vestibules

Tightly enclosed areas around the sides or front of your tent that give additional room just outside the inside of your tent but protected from the elements by a rain fly. In order to save space, this is an excellent location to keep stuff outside the tent, to change out of muddy or damp clothing, to leave boots, and even to cook if campers are extremely cautious to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning or catching your tent on fire. Please see our post on the best budget backcountry tents for information on finding a tent with a vestibule.

Front Vestibules

The vestibules of a tent are only found at the front and major entrances of the structure. Depending on the tent, they might be of varying sizes. While it is possible to enter and depart your tent by a single front vestibule with a single entrance, it can be a bit difficult to do so when you have goods stowed in the vestibule.

Side Vestibules

The tent has two side vestibules, one on each side of the structure. Two vestibules and two doors inside your tent are a wonderful feature to have in a camping tent. This doubles the vestibule area and allows you to load one vestibule with gear while using the other vestibule as an escape at the same time.

Add-On Tent Vestibules

In the tent, you will find side vestibules on both sides of the structure. To have two vestibules and two entrance entrances to your tent is a wonderful luxury. As a result, you have twice the vestibule space and may load one vestibule with gear while using the other vestibule as an escape.

Should You Have a Tent Vestibule?

A tent vestibule is absolutely not required, but they do come in useful on practically every occasion. This is especially true if you live in a region where there is a chance of precipitation. Having more storage space is wonderful for freeing up room within your tent while also keeping the interior clean and dry. The trade-off for having a vestibule is negligible in comparison. Because it adds fabric to your whole tent, your packed-down tent will be somewhat larger and heavier as a result of the addition of fabric.

When sharing a tent with another person, vestibules become even more important.

This excellent feature allows you to take off your wet boots outside of the tent while still remaining shielded from the weather.

We frequently sit down inside the tent with our boots just outside the zippers, unlace them, and then pop the boots off before squeezing fully inside the tent’s interior. As a result, dirt and mud are prevented from entering the tent.

Vestibule Alternatives

A tent vestibule is absolutely not required, but they do come in useful on nearly every occasion. This is especially true if you live in a region where there is a chance of rain. Storage space is quite useful for freeing up room within your tent and keeping the interior clean and dry. Having a vestibule comes at a low cost in terms of convenience. Because it adds fabric to your whole tent, your packed-down tent will be somewhat larger and heavier as a result of the addition of material. However, considering how little the additional weight and size of vestibules is, it is nearly always worthwhile to include them in your tent design.

As a result of the additional space available for storing equipment outside the tent, there will be significantly more room available for people within the tent.

Sometimes we’ll sit down inside the tent with our boots just outside the zippers, unlace them, and then pop the boots off before squeezing completely inside the tent.

Can You Cook Inside a Tent Vestibule?

The quick answer is yes, although extra caution should be exercised in this situation. Cooking inside your tent or vestibule is almost usually discouraged, and you will hear and read about it as well. Not only may you burn a hole in your tent, but the carbon monoxide emitted by camping stoves can cause death or illness in certain people. The most important thing to remember is to keep your space adequately ventilated. If the air is not moving through the system at a reasonable rate, you may be accumulating deadly quantities of carbon monoxide.

Bears are another factor to consider in this situation.

When camping in bear territory, it is strongly advised to cook a short distance away from your tent or campfire.

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Additional Pictures

Short answer: sure, however considerable caution should be exercised in this situation. Cooking inside your tent or vestibule is something you will almost always hear and read about. Because of the carbon monoxide produced by camp stoves, it is possible to die or become sick if you are using one. In this case, it’s critical that you have enough of ventilation in your space. Your carbon monoxide levels might rise to potentially deadly levels if the air is not moving through the system at a reasonable rate.

In this case, bears are another consideration.

When camping in bear territory, it is strongly advised to cook a short distance away from your tent and campfires. Do you have any other comments? Contact us to let us know what happened.

What Is A Tent Vestibule? What Does It Do?

Yes, in a nutshell, but with tremendous caution. Cooking inside your tent or vestibule is almost always discouraged, both verbally and in print. Not only may you burn a hole in your tent, but the carbon monoxide emitted by camping stoves can also cause death or illness. You must make certain that your work environment is adequately ventilated in this situation. If the air is not moving through the system at a reasonable rate, you might be accumulating deadly quantities of carbon monoxide. Because it has no stench and is transparent, it has the potential to kill you without you ever realizing it is there.

If you are cooking in your tent, you will be leaving a lot of delicious-smelling items behind.

Is there anything more you’d want to say?

What Does A Tent Vestibule Do?

Tent vestibules will provide you with a measure of protection from the elements when you are entering and exiting your tent. That implies that if it’s pouring outside, you may enter your tent’s vestibule and dry off before entering the main body of your tent, which would prevent you from tracking mud and water into your tent. They also give additional storage space for both you and your belongings. However, I would not advocate sleeping in the vestibule of your tent because they are often not as well protected from the elements as the remainder of the tent.

Do You Need A Tent Vestibule?

Vestibules in tents provide a measure of protection from the weather when you are entering and exiting the tent. So, when it’s pouring outside, you may enter the vestibule of your tent and dry off before entering the main area of your tent, which prevents you from tracking dirt, rain, or other liquids inside of your tent. You and your belongings will also benefit from the additional storage space they give. The vestibule of your tent, on the other hand, is not a good place to sleep since it is not as well protected from the elements as the remainder of your tent.

What Are The Benefits of A Tent Vestibule?

The biggest advantage of having a vestibule is that it allows you to remove your shoes before entering your tent, which is something I like. Who knows about you, but it annoys me to track dirt and leaves inside my tent and then have to clean it out afterwards! It is possible to remove your shoes inside of the vestibule of your tent, eliminating the need to worry about tracking all of that dirt into your tent. Cleaning up after your tent when it’s time to pack it up will be considerably simpler as a result of this.

When you are not using your cooler or cooking equipment, you may keep them in your vestibule instead of needing to store them inside your tent at night, which allows you to free up more space within your tent for your other camping gear.

Tent vestibules, as the name implies, are meant to keep you protected from the weather while yet allowing you to exit the main section of your tent.

If you put your cooler inside your tent, you won’t have to leave it except to go to the bathroom, saving you time and money.

Provided you were really in need of more sleeping space, you could even have someone sleep inside your vestibule on warmer nights if they weren’t bothered by the prospect of sleeping beneath the stars. Because they will be mostly covered by mesh, they will be protected from the outside world.

What Are The Downsides To Having A Tent Vestibule?

It is the fact that you may remove your shoes before entering your tent that I find most appealing about having a vestibule. No offense to you, but it annoys me to drag dirt and leaves inside my tent and then have to clean it out afterwards. It is possible to remove your shoes inside of the vestibule of your tent, eliminating the need to worry about tracking all of the dirt into your tent. Cleaning up after your tent when it’s time to pack it up will be considerably simpler as a result of this arrangement.

  1. Rather of needing to store your cooler or cooking equipment inside your tent at night, you can store them within your vestibule while you are not using them, allowing you to free up more space inside your tent for your other camping goods.
  2. Water will more than likely get inside of your tent vestibule if you do so.
  3. This is convenient if you put your cooler within your vestibule and need to get up to fetch a drink in the middle of the evening.
  4. Alternatively, on warmer evenings, you might have someone sleep inside your vestibule if they didn’t mind sleeping beneath the stars if you were absolutely in need of some extra sleeping space.
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Are there tents with a side vestibule?

Tents with side vestibules do exist, although they are less frequent than tents with front vestibules, which are more prevalent. One of the most common features of a side vestibule tent is the presence of two entrances, which would provide you with a space to keep your camping stuff on one side of the tent and allow you to enter and exit through the tent on the other side. This provides you with more flexibility when it comes to how you put up your tent at your campground.

What is the best tent with a vestibule?

Four-person tent by Coleman (Carlsbad). A number of great new features have been added to this Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent in recent years, and I think it’s well worth your time to check it out. Inside, the tent is 9 feet by 7 feet, with a central height of 5 feet. The tent is available in a variety of colors. The screen room’s measurements are 9 feet by 4 feet, and it seats four people. With that being stated, this tent will be of a more standard size, and it should be able to accommodate 2-4 people comfortably.

  1. You should be able to squeeze a queen-size inflatable bed into the space and comfortably sleep two people.
  2. This tent, which uses dark room technology, prevents 97 percent of the sunlight from entering the tent, which would otherwise enter.
  3. Additionally, darkroom technology will keep the tent cooler in the summer months since it will allow less sunlight to enter the tent, allowing it to stay cooler than a comparable tent that does not have darkroom technology.
  4. This tent is also equipped with Coleman’s Weathertec system, which means it is built to withstand rain and wind conditions.

Check out the current Amazon pricing for this Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent if you’re interested in seeing what they’re now offering.

6-person tents

Camping Dome Tent for 6 People by Coleman Steel Creek This Coleman Steel Creek Dome Tent is another popular 6-person tent that comes with a vestibule as an option. This tent has inside dimensions of 10 feet by 9 feet and a screen area of 10 feet by 5 feet. It is available in a variety of colors. This tent has enough room for 6 people to sleep side by side, or two queen air mattresses that can accommodate 4 people each comfortably in the tent. It should be noted that the rain fly on this tent does not completely cover the tent, but it does cover most of it and includes awnings over the windows on either side of the tent.

  1. This tent also has color-coded poles to make it easier for you to set up the tent at your camping destination.
  2. Check out the current Amazon pricing for this Coleman Steel Creek Dome tent if you’re interested in seeing what they’re now offering.
  3. This tent is essentially the same as the Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent that I discussed before, but it is a little bit larger and built to accommodate 6 people laying side by side instead of 4.
  4. When compared to the Carlsbad 4-person tent, it essentially adds a foot in each direction to the overall length.
  5. A Coleman representative claims that this tent will accommodate two inflatable queen airbeds without any issues.
  6. On mornings when the sun has already risen, it will also allow you to sleep in a little longer.

8-person tents

Six-person dome tent by Coleman Steel Creek. This Coleman Steel Creek Dome Tent is another popular 6-person tent that has a vestibule. There are inside measurements of 10 feet by 9 feet, as well as a screen room measuring 10 feet by 5 feet. This tent has enough room for 6 people to sleep side by side, or two queen air mattresses that can accommodate 4 people each comfortably in the inside. It should be noted that the rain fly on this tent does not completely cover the tent, but it covers the most of it and has awnings over the windows on either side of the tent.

  1. This tent also has color-coded poles to make it easier for you to set up the tent at your campground.
  2. Check out the current Amazon pricing for this Coleman Steel Creek Dome tent if you’re interested in finding out more.
  3. However, this tent is a bit larger and built to accommodate 6 people if they are arranged side by side, as opposed to the Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent that I stated before.
  4. When comparing it to the Carlsbad 4-person tent, it effectively adds a foot in each direction.
  5. A Coleman representative claims that this tent will accommodate two inflatable queen air beds.

On mornings when the sun has already risen, you will be able to sleep in a little longer. On Amazon, you can get the current prices for this Coleman Carlsbad tent by clicking here and entering the model number.

Related Questions

Is it better to have a huge vestibule or a little vestibule? In the event that you want to utilize your tent vestibule for storage and have a considerable amount of camping gear, you may want to consider purchasing a tent with a spacious vestibule. With a spacious vestibule, you will have more space to walk around and will be able to cover more ground to get in and out of your tent while still being protected from the weather. Is it possible to include a vestibule in your tent? It is true that you can purchase add-on vestibules for your tent, but I would recommend purchasing a tent that already includes one if you truly want one.

  • However, you may be able to purchase an add-on vestibule that would operate as a second rain fly, which would assist to avoid rain from coming inside your tent and ruining your camping experience.
  • If you are unfamiliar with the term “rain fly” or are interested in learning how to make your rain fly waterproof, you may want to read my post outlining what the primary function of rain flys is and how to make them as waterproof as possible.
  • If you’re planning on going hiking and require a backpacking tent with a vestibule, I’d recommend opting with the Coleman Hooligan backpacking tent, which has a vestibule and is lightweight.
  • The Coleman Hooligan tent is made of polyester and measures 9 feet by 7 feet on the outside.
  • The rainfly is a full-coverage rain fly that wraps around the front of the tent to provide additional protection.
  • It also has a waterproof floor, which is an added bonus.
  • What is the most effective method of waterproofing my tent?

What Is A Tent Vestibule? (And Do You Need One?)

Should a huge vestibule be chosen instead? In the event that you want to utilize your tent vestibule for storage and have a significant amount of camping gear, you may want to consider purchasing a tent with a larger vestibule. If your tent has a spacious vestibule, you will have more space to move around and will be able to go in and out of your tent more easily while still being protected from the weather. Does your tent have the option of adding a vestibule? A vestibule may be purchased separately for your tent, however if you absolutely want a vestibule I recommend purchasing a tent that has one.

  1. However, you may be able to purchase an add-on vestibule that would operate as a second rain fly, which would assist to avoid rain from coming inside your tent and ruining your camping trip.
  2. If you don’t know what a rain fly is or are interested in learning how to make your rain fly waterproof, you may want to read my post outlining what the main purpose of rain flys is and how to make them as waterproof as possible before continuing on.
  3. A 4-person tent, the Coleman Hooligan tent is 9 by 7 feet on the inside, and it has a carrying capacity of 50 pounds.
  4. An all-encompassing rain covering that wraps around the front of the tent is known as a rainfly.
  5. It also has a waterproof floor, which is a nice addition.
  6. When it comes to waterproofing my tent, what is the best method?

If you’re interested in understanding the best methods for waterproofing a tent, I’ve created an essay on the subject that outlines the best methods for making your tent waterproof as well as which tents provide the greatest waterproof technology.

Types Of Tent Vestibules

Tent vestibules come in a variety of shapes and sizes, with the space they are meant to expand varying from one to the next. You may either make one out of waterproof materials or purchase an add-on version that will do the job for you.

Front Vestibules

The vestibule in the front is quite large. These vestibules are attached to the front entrance of the tent. A variety of sizes are available, with some being big enough to keep substantial equipment away from the outdoors. Keeping your camping goods in a front vestibule, on the other hand, may make accessing and departing your tent more difficult, especially if your tent has just one entrance.

Side Vestibules

Two vestibules are included in the price of the tent. Side vestibules are located on either side of the tent’s perimeter. Some tents are equipped with or have the ability to accommodate two vestibules. This choice often gives more space and allows you to utilize one as extra storage space and the other as a door. It is also more cost effective.

Add-On Tent Vestibules

If your tent does not come with a vestibule, you may be able to purchase an add-on vestibule for a little additional fee. A range of kinds and combinations are available for these products. Some more intricate accessories even have a floor surface, which allows you to use them as an extra room if you so like. Unfortunately, if your tent type does not come with a tent vestibule add-on, locating a universal tent vestibule add-on can be difficult, and they frequently do not fit perfectly onto your tent.

Should You Invest In A Tent Vestibule?

Tent vestibules are not strictly essential, but they are a wonderful addition to have on hand as an alternative. In particular, if you live in a region with a lot of precipitation or if you’re planning a long camping trip, you should be prepared. It is impossible to exaggerate the value of the additional room and convenience. Vestibules increase the weight and dimensions of a packed tent by a little amount. Having said that, the additional weight is generally little, making the investment in a vestibule a small tradeoff.

They are quite useful due to the increased storage and optimization of inside tent space that they provide.

DIY Tent Vestibule

It is rather simple to construct a DIY tent vestibule using only a few materials, some of which you may already have lying around the house. What you’ll need is the following:

  • A tarp or other water-resistant covering
  • Stakes
  • A rope or cord
  • And other materials
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Vestibule for a Tent Constructed from a Poncho Tarp

Should My Tent Footprint Extend To My Vestibule?

Constructing a Poncho Tarp Vestibule is an easy and inexpensive DIY project.

Can I Cook In My Tent Vestibule?

Vestibule for a Tent Made from a Poncho Tarp

How Big Of A Vestibule Do I Need?

The amount of vestibule space you’ll want will be determined by what you intend to use it for and what you intend to store in it. For example, if you only want a tiny vestibule to store your shoes, you do not require a large vestibule space. You’ll need extra space, though, if you want to keep anything like a bicycle in your storage unit. If you’re going to be cooking in your tent during the winter, a bigger vestibule that extends further away from the tent is also advised. For each individual, we propose around 6 square feet of vestibule area on average.

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What Is A Tent Vestibule Used For

Most of the tents that are now available on the market feature some form of vestibule in their design. So, what is the function of a tent vestibule and what is its purpose? You may find out more about it here.

First, what is a tent vestibule?

When it comes to tents, the vestibule is a covered compartment that does not function as a part of the sleeping area. Consequently, according to this definition, they all fall into one of the two categories listed below:

  • Accessory vestibules are vestibules that are physically attached to the tent flap and form a single physical unit. They’ll be known as “fly vestibules” from now on.

It is possible to acquire supplementary vestibules separately, which will provide you with an additional enclosed place for your belongings. That is why you will hear the termgear shed used sometimes, only to familiarize yourself with the phrase in case you come across something similar in the future. Big Agnes Big House Vestibules are an example of this style of structure. They have a variety of sizes available, as you can see by clicking the link. The Huba Huba NX Gear Shed is yet another excellent example that can be seen on the website.

For want of a better phrase, I’ll refer to the second group as tentfly vestibules.

As a result, I’ll say a few words about this kind because it is more commonly seen.

Tent fly vestibules

If you check at the mytents website, you will note that virtually all of them have a vestibule, however there are some outliers. I may have overlooked some varieties, but all of the tents listed here are classified into one of the following categories:

  1. Tents that do not have vestibules
  2. Tents having one or more side door(s) and one or more side vestibule(s)
  3. Tents having one or more side doors as well as a vestibule at the front
  4. Temporary structures that have a front entrance as well as a corresponding front vestibule
  5. Tents with a front door as well as side vestibules are available. Tents with a certain design, with a tarp that serves as a vestibule or an awning
  6. Tents with a specific size and shape
  7. Tents that have a vestibule with two zippers that can be transformed into an awning
  8. Tents with a vestibule that can be transformed into an awning

No vestibule tents; Tents without doors. Temporary structures with one or more side door(s) and one or more side vestibule(s) Side-entrance tents with a front vestibule and one or more side doors Temporary structures that include a front entrance as well as a front vestibule Tents have a front door as well as side vestibules. The design of a tent, as well as the presence of a large tarp that can be used as a vestibule or an awning, are important factors in the purchase decision. Vestibule tents that have two zippers that allow them to be transformed into an awning; tents with a vestibule that has two zippers that allow them to be transformed into an awning

1. Tents without vestibules

Historically, such tents were more prevalent. They are becoming increasingly rare, but the Kelty Rover tent is a recent example of one. The Kelty Rover tent does not have a vestibule. Tents (typically winter tents) with a form of vestibule built within the tent are one sub-type of this set of structures. This means that a portion of the floor area within the tent as well as the area immediately adjacent to the entrance will be exposed. As a result, this is a zone where you can take off your boots.

2. Tents with side doors and side vestibules

The term’side’ should be interpreted to refer to the side of the tent that is longer. A large number of the tents on the campsite are of this design. Because there is more space on the side for a large door, this is an excellent design choice for a bathroom.

As a result, you get a vestibule that covers the area in front of the entrance door. There are two options: you may have it on one side (like in the Kelty Salida 1 and Salida 2tents) or on both sides (see theMountainsmith Morrison 2 tent).

3. Tents with side door(s) and with front vestibule

The term “front” refers to the shorter side of the tent in this context. Consequently, the door is on the longer side, while the vestibule is on the shorter side. Sierra Designs Tensegritytents provide an intriguing design that you can see in person. Side door and front vestibule of the Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 are shown in this photo.

4. Tents with front doors and corresponding front vestibule.

This design is common in single tents; for example, the Big Agnes Fly Creek Platinum 1 is an example. Also available in tents with one entrance for two people, such as those from the same series as Platinum 2. For a tent for two people with a single door, it is preferable to have a front door rather than a side door so that both occupants are in an equal position in relation to the single door.

5. Tents with front doors and side vestibules

This is a fascinating design, as seen by the Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL tent, which has this characteristic. The vestibules serve only as storage places for equipment, and the front entrance is only partially covered by a modest awning to provide protection from the elements. As previously said, this is a fantastic alternative because all of the area beneath the vestibule(s) is dedicated to gear storage. In contrast, when the vestibule is located in front of the door, you can only utilize a portion of the area for stuff, leaving the remaining space available for getting in and out of the tent.

6. Tents with a particular design, with tarps which serve as vestibules

When combined with a tarp of any kind, every tent from the first group above falls under this category. Some tents, on the other hand, are designed to be used with tarps as vestibules (or awnings). In this case, the Kelty Rover tent stated above is included; the Rover Tarp, which may be bought separately and used in conjunction with the tent, is also included. Another example is the Kelty TN2 tent, which includes a specific buckle that allows you to attach the Kelty Upslope Tarp to the tent’s floor.

The Kelty Mirada tent with a tarp is the greatest example of this style of tent.

7. Tents with a vestibule that has two zippers which allow it to transform into an awning

It is included in this category if a tent from the first group is utilized with any type of tarp. A few, however, have been specifically designed to be utilized as vestibules when used in conjunction with tarps (or awnings). In this category is the Kelty Rover tent, which was described above; the Rover Tarp, which may be bought separately and used in conjunction with the tent, is also in this group. An even better example is the Kelty TN2 tent, which features a specific buckle that allows you to attach the Kelty Upslope Tarp to the tent.

The Kelty Mirada tent with a tarp is the greatest example of this sort of tent design.

Should you really use a vestibule?

In the case of the tent fly vestibules, you don’t have an option but to use what is provided. It is an integral element of the fly, and it cannot be separated from it. However, if you believe you will not require one, look for a tent that does not include a vestibule. It should be noted that finding any will be difficult.

What you do with the supplementary vestibules is entirely up to you and depends on the scenario. If you camp in a location with easy access by automobile, having such a feature can make it much easier to plan your life while you’re there. If you don’t think about it, it’s unlikely that you will.

Conclusion

So that’s all I had to say about what a tent vestibule is used for. I hope you found it useful. As you can see, it serves a variety of functions:

  • It takes up a little amount of space above the entrance and provides some protection from the weather. It gives a place for you to keep your belongings
  • A lovely awning for sitting in front of the tent is included in some innovative designs, which adds to the comfort of the experience.

I hope you have found this text to be helpful. Using the comment box below, please let me know if you believe that a certain tent and vestibule design should be included in this collection. I hope you have a wonderful day.

What Is a Camping Tent\’s Vestibule? (Find the Answer Here)

Considering that many tents on the market are equipped with one or more vestibules, I believe it is a good idea to have the word “camping tent’s vestibule” stated in one location for convenience. As a result, please continue reading. In a nutshell, the vestibule of a camping tent is an extension of the tent that is sheltered from the elements. Typically, a vestibule is a component of the tent’s shell or tent’s fly, although it may also be an independent structure. The following are the reasons why I distinguish between the tent’s shell and its fly.

Some tents, on the other hand, include an interior canopy as well as a fly as a second layer of protection.

Some tents are also equipped with a detachable vestibule, however this is an unusual feature.

It is possible to get cabin tents with a full-coverage fly, although these tents are typically without a vestibule; an example of this kind is the Coleman Octagon 98 Full Fly Tent, which is seen above.

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What is the purpose of a tent vestibule?

  • I believe it is a good idea to have the word “camping tent vestibule” explained in one place as a reference because many tents on the market come with one or more vestibules. So here is the text, please continue to read! To put it another way, the vestibule of a camping tent is an extension of the tent that is shielded from the elements. It is common for vestibules to be constructed as a component of a tent’s shell or as a part of the tent fly. The following are the reasons why I distinguish between the tent’s shell and its fly: A single-layer construction is adequate for some tents, and in this case, the shell should be mentioned instead of the inner structure. A fly serves as a second layer in certain tents, while others have an inner canopy alone. Thus, the vestibule is made of the same waterproof fabric as the tent itself. The vestibule of some tents is also detachable, however this is an unusual feature. The majority of tents with a full coverage fly contain vestibules, and this is nearly often the true with dome tents as well. Alternatively, you may have a cabin tent with a full-coverage fly but without a vestibule. An example of this style is the Coleman Octagon 98 Full Fly Tent, which has a vestibule.

Tent for six people at Marmot Guest House.

Disadvantages of having a vestibule

A vestibule increases the amount of covered area available in a tent, and having such an addition is usually beneficial; nevertheless, it should be noted that a vestibule makes a tent non-freestanding. In other words, the inner tent can be completely independent, but when you put the fly on, you must anchor the vestibule flaps in order to have a practical entry and storage room for your belongings. As a result, there is a certain amount of trade-off. Many tent manufacturers that construct tents with vestibules refer to their products as “freestanding,” however this is not necessarily the case due to the factors described above.

  • As an illustration, consider this well-constructed REI Base Camp 6 Tent: The Base Camp 6 Tent from REI.
  • This may be inconvenient.
  • Overall, having a camping tent with a vestibule may be beneficial if you want additional storage space for your goods.
  • If you are on a cross-country journey and do not have any gear or want to keep it in the car, you can choose a tent that does not have a vestibule.

You might also be interested in reading my text on the subject of single wall tent versus double wall tent. Thank you for taking the time to read this. In the event that you have any questions or comments, please let me know by using the comment box provided below. Wishing you a pleasant day.

10 Best Tents With Vestibules 2022

There are many different kinds of tent accessories available. A tent vestibule is a feature that is particularly useful in a tent. A tent vestibule is a covered section that runs along the front or sides of a tent’s perimeter. It gives additional room outside of the tent’s walls, yet it is protected from the elements by a rain fly. This provides a camper with additional room that is outside of their tent but still within it, which is useful for a variety of uses. This additional area allows you to keep dirty boots or garments outside your tent, store other items outside so it does not take up valuable tent space, and even cook outside your tent, which is much safer than cooking inside your tent.

Do You Need a Vestibule?

Not that a vestibule is necessarily essential, to be honest with you. Having a tent with a covered entrance, on the other hand, is almost always beneficial. Indeed, the additional fabric of a vestibule makes your tent a bit larger and a little heavier, but in the long run, it’s usually always worth the extra weight and bulk. If you’re camping with a large group of people in a single tent, vestibules are really essential for efficiently maintaining as much room open within the tent as possible while keeping everyone comfortable.

The bottom line is that a tent with a vestibule is nearly always preferable than a tent without one.

Top 10 Tents With Vestibules 2022

After discussing what tent vestibules are and why you should consider purchasing one before going camping, let’s have a look at some of the best tents with vestibules on the market.

Ayamaya Pop Up Tent with Vestibule

Given what tent vestibules are and why you should consider purchasing one before going camping, let’s have a look at some of the most popular models with vestibules on the market right now.

  • Vestibules in the front of the tent – These vestibules are positioned at the entrance to your tent’s front door. The size of the vestibule varies from tent to tent and there is no standard size that must be met. When it comes to some tents, the front vestibules are the only ones you have, which is a disadvantage. When the vestibule is congested, it might be difficult to get into and out of the tent, which can be frustrating. Both sides of the tent include vestibules, which are located on either side of the tent. Some tents feature two vestibules, which provides you with more storage space. It also means that they aren’t usually in front of your door, which is good news. Vestibules that can be purchased separately – Some tents do not come with vestibules, but they do offer add-on vestibules that can be purchased separately and attached to the tent. Once they are joined, they work in the same way as any other vestibule. In terms of whether they may be included, it is dependent on the tent

What is a Tent Vestibule?

Every year, according to the Outdoor Industry Association, a whooping 40 million individuals venture into the great outdoors to go camping! It doesn’t matter if you enjoy camping and go as often as possible, or if you are just beginning to plan your very first camping trip, you are in excellent company. You may, however, discover that you have a high learning curve when it comes to camping, just like you would with any other new skill or pastime when you are just getting started. Lots to learn, including new vocabulary that will assist you in selecting the best tent for your trip – your home away from home!

What is a Tent Vestibule?

Each year, according to the Outdoor Industry Association, a whooping 40 million individuals venture into the great outdoors to go camping! It doesn’t matter if you enjoy camping and go as often as possible, or if you are just getting started with your very first camping trip, you are in excellent company. You may, however, find that you have a high learning curve when it comes to camping, just like you would with any other new skill or pastime when you first begin. Lots to learn, including new vocabulary that will assist you in selecting the best tent for your trip – your home away from home – The purpose of a tent vestibule, what it can accomplish, how it works and how to use it are all covered in this article to ensure that you have the greatest camping adventure possible.

Front tent vestibule

The vestibule near the front of the tent may appear to be the most obvious. Due to the fact that you enter and depart your tent from the front, you will want to shake off the elements before entering your tent and ready to confront the elements before exiting your tent. For those who are camping in a single tent with a number of other people and anticipate that everyone will need to store their wet shoes and gear in the vestibule, having a front entry vestibule can make entering and exiting the tent somewhat cluttered and awkward, not to mention potentially dangerous, if the tent is on the ground.

Side tent vestibule

The vestibule towards the front of the tent may appear to be the most logical. Given that you enter and depart your tent from the front, it seems sense that you would want to shake off the elements before entering your tent and ready to confront the elements before exiting your tent. For those who are camping in a single tent with a number of other people and anticipate that everyone will need to store their wet shoes and gear in the vestibule, having a front entry vestibule can make entering and exiting the tent somewhat cluttered and awkward, not to mention potentially dangerous.

But What if My Tent Doesn’t Have a Vestibule?

It’s not a huge deal at all. It is entirely a matter of personal choice. A vestibule is more of a luxury than it is a requirement in most situations. If you’re wanting to add a tent vestibule to an existing tent, this is the guide for you. It is feasible to acquire an aftermarket tent vestibule – either from the same manufacturer or from a third party – that will match the size and design of the tent that you have already bought. If you want to use your new tent for camping during the wet or cold seasons, when adverse weather is more likely to occur, you may want to give this alternative some thought.

Another alternative to a tent vestibule

If you have purchased a tent that does not have a vestibule, you are not need to purchase an aftermarket vestibule in order to benefit from the shelter provided by one. You might want to think about utilizing a tent tarp instead. It’s possible that you’ll be able to use the fundamental framework of your tent to support your tent tarp. It is possible that you may need to carry additional pegs to support your tarp in some instances.

Why not use a tent vestibule?

If you have purchased a tent that does not have a vestibule, you are not need to purchase an aftermarket vestibule in order to benefit from the shelter provided by the tent’s vestibule.

Instead of a tarp, you might use a tent tarp. The fundamental framework of your tent may be able to serve as a support for the tarp that you have attached to it. It is possible that you will need to carry additional pegs to support your tarp in some instances, so keep this in mind.

Wrapping it up

When it comes to your camping gear, a tent vestibule might be an excellent addition! The addition of a tent vestibule allows you to adapt your camping experience to your tastes, whether you are just preparing ahead in case of an unforeseen storm or you need a place outside your tent to keep shoes and belongings to free up room within your tent.

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