What Is A Name Tent

Student Relationship Building with Name Tents

It has always been difficult for me to recall the names of the pupils on my roster as a specialist at a school with over 400 students on my roster. It is the last thing I want to do in my role as a school counselor is to call someone by the incorrect name. It does happen. Teacher after teacher has mispronounced or called me by the wrong name for a whole year, and I am quite certain that this is something I have done as well. It is vital, though, to learn a student’s name in order to establish an authentic connection with them.

When you are on a first-name relationship with your pupils, something unique happens.

  • Fold a piece of copy paper into three equal sections, then write your name in large letters on the center portion. Fold the paper into a 3-dimensional triangle and lay it in front of the desk with the name facing out

To make the tents a little more interesting and entertaining, I designed these zen name tents. Besides being useful for calling on students during a class, they also act as a reminder when I wish to greet a certain student by name in the corridor. We utilize these tents multiple times before retiring them for the year, so I appoint a student to be in charge of giving out and collecting the tents for each class over the semester. This task is assigned to a pupil through the usage of a work tent.

My time has been significantly reduced as a result of this, which has also significantly increased my contact with my pupils.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

Name Tent Activity For The First Day Of School + Free Template

Making a name tent on the first day of school is an easy foldable activity that allows students to get to know one another while also building classroom community. This back-to-school exercise is perfect for when your children are walking into their first classroom setting. On the first day of school, it helps to keep the class focused while welcoming parents or new students in the hall. Consider incorporating these desk name tents into your classroom’s first day of school festivities if you’re looking for ideas for first day of school activities.

Name Tent Directions

A name tent is a piece of paper that has been folded in two. The students write their names in the centre of the front side, and then write something about themselves in each corner of the front side as well.

Name Tent Ideas for the Classroom

However, by utilizing a name tent as a communication tool on those first few days of school, it may be put to far greater use. Writing to one another is an excellent approach to foster a sense of community in the classroom. To begin, create three columns. Then, identify each column with the date, the day of the week, the student reflection, and the response from the instructor. After that, build five rows and identify each row with the day of the week that it is. On the left-hand side, there is a spot for your children to jot down their reactions to their days for a week.

Instruct the children to share whatever they find interesting with you. Here are some suggestions for what they might like to contribute.

  1. I’m curious how you felt about today
  2. What was your first impression as you walked into the classroom? What information do you want me to have about you? What did you take away from today’s lesson about your instructor or classmates? What did you take away from the experience? What was your favorite recreational activity? Do you wish we had more time to do the things we want to do? What do you hope to accomplish this year
  3. What are your goals? What actions would you have like to have carried out differently? Do you have a positive attitude for this school year? What are you looking forward to the most this school year, and why?

When you use this variation on name tents in the classroom, you may gain valuable information into how well your new students are getting to know one another as well as the effectiveness of each activity scheduled for the first week of school.

Name Tent Template Freebie for the Classroom

In the classroom, there are two methods to go about putting names on tents. One method is to download the name tent template and print out copies for each student in your class. The second method is to hand out blank sheets of paper and have your children fill them up. Whatever choice you pick, let your children to have fun decorating their name tents and making them as one-of-a-kind as they are themselves. Wishing you all the best on your first day of school.

Week 1 Day 1 – Name Tents with Feedback

106UPDATE The month of May 2020: Remote/Distance/eLearning has ushered in a new era of teachers who have stepped up to modify this exercise for use when they are not in their classrooms with their pupils. If their ideas pique your interest, continue reading to the bottom of this piece to see more and to find links to the work they have done. Last year, I had the opportunity to teach Advanced Algebra (also known as Alg 2 or Alg/Trig) at a school that was new to me. I was wise in that I went into the year relying on the knowledge of people who had recently taught Adv Alg in the previous year (for me it had been 11 years ago).

  • I’ve had a lot of first days of school in my professional life, but I’m confident that I can learn even more.
  • It was her explanation that she utilizes name tents and that during the first week of school, she writes a brief message for each pupil reacting to whatever they have written within the name tent.
  • We must establish personal connections with pupils.
  • Students improve more as a result of feedback rather than a numerical or letter grade.
  • We must ensure that our classrooms are welcoming environments for all students.
  • Morgan’s objectives for the first week are simple: to establish relationships with her pupils and to foster a sense of community among the entire class.
  • My very first slide of class on the first day of school last year in our High School Math Classrooms was shown here on the screen.

I instructed pupils to write their initial name on both sides of the paper.

(Please notice that I have modified it somewhat for this year and have linked it lower down in the post): NameTentFeedback This document is an exact copy of the Word document Morgan sent to me.

Tonya Hodge, one of our school’s AVID leaders, gave this to Morgan as a thank you gift (a ELA teacher).

My request was for them to introduce themselves to the folks with whom they were seated.

This was their first task for the first week of class.

My class consisted of pupils in the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades.

Morgan’s and my objective for the first week was to establish a community of math learners.

As an aside: The process of establishing a sense of community during the first week of school is fairly frequent in middle school; however, it has not been my experience that this is as common in high school mathematics courses.

We continued with our activities from the previous day.

AA The first day of school was a slog.

An additional portion of my day 1 lecture was posted about HERE the day before.

They did so well.

When we were down to the final five minutes of class, I finally got the students to open their name tents and write me a letter in the yellow highlighted box about anything they wanted to about day one.

That afternoon, I composed a response to each and every kid in my class using a response template.

I enjoy the wide range of answers I receive from my pupils.

I made a point of spending 1-2 minutes every day reading what every pupil was thinking and responding to it.

Not only did it assist me in memorizing names even more quickly, but it also provided me with valuable information about my students and their relationship to my class.

Here are a number of things I discovered after implementing name tents in my high school mathematics classroom during the first week of school.

  1. I have homework tasks that I offer to students during the first week of school that require them to write a great deal more about themselves. This does not take the place of them, but it was an excellent addition. With the extra benefit of being able to provide fast response to pupils
  2. After three days of receiving the prompt “comments,” some students were writing very little or just saying something like “It was OK.” During the last minute of class on day 4, I encouraged students to “Ask me a question” instead of making a remark, and I promised to answer any questions they had regarding the class or about myself personally. This was a huge success. I received a large number of excellent questions. I tried to be as honest as possible in my responses to everyone. As an added bonus, I posted some questions on the board for the whole class to see, allowing everyone to obtain feedback on what their peers were asking of me. I’ve created a new and improved Name Tent for this year’s first week of school (see the bottom of this page for more information), which includes the opportunity for kids to ask me questions. Here are some of the questions that students have posed to me. I adore them
  3. Despite reading and replying to kids on a daily basis with what they wrote in their name tents, I was still missing hints that they were sending me. When I went back to the name tents to write this piece, I found some information that my kids had supplied me but that I had overlooked. Consider the following image of the inside of this student’s tent: This was the exterior rear of his tent, and it was very stunning: What I now know about this kid, having missed the first week of class, is that he performed best in math class when we were engaged in more creative activities. This kid completed the least amount of homework and classwork of any student I had this year until about two-thirds of the way through the year, when I completed my Desmos Art Project, and he produced the following in 24 hours: Having reflected on the situation, I wish I had taken notice of his outstanding doodles in week 1 and utilized this as a signal to develop lessons that would engage him sooner. This is something I intend to alter — this year. The name tent this year has been modified to promote sketching instead of replying to me
  4. I understand that many people reading this may say, “Sara, name tents are fantastic, but I just do not have time to put them together.” To give you some hope, I can assure you that the time I invested in them was completely worthwhile. While teaching full-time during the first week of school last year, I would also leave school each day to attend the Minnesota State Fair and work at our Math On-a-Stick exhibit in the evenings, which was a great experience. I had a lot on my plate. I went ahead and did it anyhow, and I’m so pleased I did. In order to hear daily from every student AND for you to give them feedback, I HIGHLY encourage you to consider using these name tents OR doing something else during week 1
  5. I did read my name tents again at the end of September once I got to know my students a little better and I learned a great deal more. This is something I intend to do again this year. If I can figure out a method to do something similar to garner more student comments like this in October or November of this year, I would. For example, every day during week 1 I spent time (5 minutes) making students remember EVERY first name of every kid in the class In fact, I put them to the test on it the next week. Every day, I asked 1-2 groups to step up and introduce themselves to the rest of the class. By day 6, I would estimate that 60 percent of my pupils knew every name, and another 35 percent knew at least 80 percent or more of the names. It fostered a strong sense of camaraderie in the classroom. Later in the first quarter, students expressed their gratitude for the fact that other students recognized their names.
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When I offer homework during week 1, I ask students to write a lot more about themselves than they would normally do. Rather of replacing them, this was a fantastic addition to the collection. Additionally, it allowed me to provide students with fast response; after three days of a ‘comments’ prompt, some students were writing very little or just saying, “It was OK.” During the last minute of class on day 4, I invited students to “Ask me a question” instead of posting a remark, and I promised to answer any questions they had regarding this class or about me personally.

  • A slew of excellent inquiries were directed my way.
  • In addition, I posted some questions on the board for the entire class to see, so that everyone could obtain feedback on what their peers were asking me to do for them.
  • A sample of the questions that students have posed to me are presented here.
  • In writing this piece, I went back through the name tents and discovered some information my kids had supplied me that I had overlooked previously.
  • He performed his best in math class when we were engaged in more creative activities.
  • This year, I’m going to fix that.
  • While teaching full-time during the first week of school last year, I also left school each day to attend the Minnesota State Fair, where I worked at our Math On-a-Stick exhibit in the afternoons.
  • However, I went ahead and did it, and I’m so pleased I did!
  • At the end of September, after getting to know my students a little better, I went back and read my name tents again, and learned a TON!
  • If I can figure out a method to do something similar to garner more student comments like this in October or November of this year, I would.
  • 1-2 groups were required to stand up and introduce themselves to the class on a daily basis.

Community building in the classroom was greatly enhanced. Later in the first quarter, students expressed their gratitude for the fact that other students recognized their names;

  1. Kristen Fouss has added Name Tents to Desmos so that she may provide feedback to her pupils through the use of this tool. Thank you to Desmos and Kristen for making suggestions to improve the concepts presented in this post. Check out what Kristen created on Desmos HERE (you may duplicate and adapt her work), and read the responses she received when she shared her work on FACEBOOK. Additionally, here are 100 prompts that others have compiled for you to utilize
  2. My friend Erica Heinzman in San Diego contributed her Google version of the form HERE, which you can get HERE.

Here’s a picture of my Google name tent. Even after we’ve completed the five rounds, Ss may sometimes email me with a “Name Tent” entry. Erica Heinzman (@eheinzman1) will be born on May 22, 2020.

  1. Several of you answered with suggestions for how to customize Name Tents using Google resources within Google Classroom after Nanette Johnson requested for help. Take a look at it here:

Mrs. Johnson and I were talking about how to begin to develop a culture and connections with and among kids when we came up with the idea for this post. We brought up @saravdwerf’s name tents, and I was under the impression that you had come up with a variation to be used digitally. Is that accurate? Is iteachmathideas an MTBoS? pic.twitter.com/3LtCFaoICR Nanette Johnson (@Math m Addicts) is a math addict who uses Twitter. The date is May 21, 2020. The Idea below was published before to COVID-19, but I was impressed with how they altered the form.

Thanks to the efforts of your department, your Name Tents now resemble a text messaging exchange.

iteachmath The 30th of January 2020 will be marked by MTBoS Idil A.

Name Tent

Continue to the contentName Tent

Table Tents, Name Tents or Placards

Many events, including less formal lunches, meetings, and panel discussions, make use of double-sided name tents, tent cards, and placards. They are usually printed with text on both sides. What exactly the information is depends on what the host determines to be useful: for example, How to Write a Name on a Tent (with Pictures) Mark A. Darr is a —-—- – Identifying information and the location of the office The Mayor of (City) is referred to as either Mayor Darr or the Mayor of (City). – Name that is used in conversation —-—- —-—- —-—- —-—- —-—- (CityState) —-—-—-or —-—-—-or —-—- Mayor Mark A.

  • – —-—- (CityState)—-—-—- or—-—- (CityState) The Right Honorable Mark A.
  • -Complete and accurate identification —-—- Mayor of the city (CityState) —- So don’t bother asking, “What should I put on the card?” Question: How can I write a name on a Name Tent?
  • In what way will knowledge be most useful in supporting that function?
  • In order for people to view and use your “call-by-name,” do you need to post it somewhere?
  • Occasionally, organizers will place one version of the guest’s name in front of the guest and another version of the guest’s name at the back of the room.

However, the content shown on the tent card is based on the needs of the guest as well as the needs of the person who is seeing the tent card. — Robert Hickey The Proper Way to Write Your Name on a Table Tent Robert Hickey is the author of the book “HonorRespect.”

How to Write Names on Tent Cards for a Panel?

We’re putting together tent cards for a panel discussion that’s coming up. Two attorneys, a state senator, and the Chief Justice of the Wyoming Supreme Court will be on the panel, as will two “civilians” who are members of the press. The panel will be comprised of six people. Would it be sufficient to simply include their names on the first line, followed by their titles on the next line? -– Anne Leslie’s full name is Anne Leslie. Greetings, Ms. Leslie: The objective of a tent card is to provide two purposes: 1) to identify the speaker and 2) to offer the audience with a call-by-name when they ask questions.

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(Full Name) who is an attorney.

On Place Cards is the Name on One Side or Both Sides?

An upcoming panel discussion will be marked by the distribution of tent cards. Those participating in the panel will include six people: two attorneys, a state legislator, and Wyoming’s Chief Justice of the Wyoming Supreme Court, as well as two “civilians” who are members of the press. Would it be sufficient to merely include their names on the first line, followed by their titles on the second line, as follows? This entry was posted in Uncategorized on December 14, 2018 by admin. Ms. Anne Leslie is the author of the book Mrs.

One of the functions of a tent card is to serve as an identity card, and another use is to present the audience with a call-by-name when they have questions.

(Full Name) who works as an attorney.

– the Wyoming Supreme Court is presided over by —–—– Chief Justice (Full name) —–—– • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Robert Hickey is a well-known author and illustrator.

Place CardsPlacards: They are Different

1) Formal place cards should be used. The word infer refers to a person’s seat. On one side of the card, facing the guest, is written the name, which is on the other side of the card is not written. You write his or her name in the manner in which he or she is addressed during a conversation: Mr. Hickey is a —-—- How to Write a Name on a Place Card (with Pictures) – Senator Feinstein (D-Calif.) At formal occasions, there is likely to be a centerpiece or flower arrangement to ensure that other attendees are unable to view one another’s business cards.

—- When a high-ranking official is invited to an official function, it is customary to write only the title of the official’s position on the invitation.

E.g.,: —-—- The President of the United States Instructions on How to Write a Name on a Place Card – The Chief Justice —-—- The Mayor of the city (City) The Proper Way to Write Your Name on a Table Tent Robert Hickey is the author of the book “HonorRespect.”

When Should You Use the Forms on this Page?

Formal place cards are one way to go. The seat of a person is indicated by the word infer. On one side of the card, facing the guest, is written the name, which is on the other side is blank. His or her name should be written just as he or she would be addressed in conversation: I’d want to express my gratitude to Mr. Hickey for his assistance. Instructions on How to Write Your Name on a Place Card – Senate Minority Leader Feinstein (D-Calif.). Because of the centerpiece/floral arrangement at formal parties, other attendees are unlikely to be able to read the cards of other guests.

—- Traditionally, when a high-ranking official is invited to a formal function, the guest’s name is written with only the title of his or her position on the invitation.

The Chief Justice explains how to write a name on a place card.

The author, Robert Hickey, is the author of the book “Honor and Respect.”

Not Finding Your Answer?

—- 1)A list of all the offices, officials, and issues covered on the site may be found at the top of every page on desktop computers, at the bottom of every page on tablets, and at the bottom of every phone. Send me an e-mail if you don’t see the official you’re looking for or if you don’t see your question answered here. I respond rather quickly, generally the same day or the following day after receiving the message (unless I am traveling.) Please bear in mind that I do not have the postal or email addresses for any of the authorities, and I do not maintain track of offices that only exist in historical records.

— Robert Hickey is a well-known author.

2021-09-20T15:03:16-04:00

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The Easiest Way to Learn Student Names (in person or across distance)

Every year, I used to have trouble coming up with names. And I was quite disappointed in myself. On the first day of class, I would be overjoyed to greet my new students and share my intentions for a productive start, but I would spend the next few days stressing over pronunciation and double-checking my recollection whenever I needed to call on someone. That is no longer the case. You may learn students’ names on the first night of school in a straightforward manner. This method is suitable for use whether students begin the school year in person or via distance learning.

  1. (Are you in a hurry?
  2. If you’d like to simply have the curriculum for this activity, you can get it here.
  3. I prefer to create these name tents as one-pagers, so that kids have a pattern to follow with designated spots for each feature.
  4. On the internet, you may learn names.
  5. Simply set up the project as a Google Slide to begin working on it.
  6. It’ll then be screenshotted and dropped into a picture of themselves before being sent to you, giving you nearly the exact same snapshot that you would have had to learn from if you’d taken a photo of them in class.
  7. As you can see, with any approach, you have the opportunity to begin to get to know each pupil, as well as to learn their first and last names.

Simple Steps to Take Brainstorm: Consider what information you’d like to know about your pupils from the beginning.

Examples of such elements include: Create a template by doing the following: You may utilize the lower half of a Powerpoint slide for in-person presentations (so you can fold it later).

Simply use the shapes tool to construct boxes that contain anything you want them to contain, and then delete them.

If you instruct them to “Include your three favorite novels in the top lefthand box,” they will know what to do.

Print the name tents on cardstock (instructions on the top half, template on the bottom so it will show when they are folded) and distribute it to them.

Take pictures of each student with their card to use as study aids later on, and leave the cards out for at least the first week to create a simple and adaptable seating plan that can be changed each day.

Finally, throughout the year, substitute teachers can utilize the name tents to swiftly divide kids into small groups before they come on group work days.

As an example, show them a model that you’ve created.

At the end of the process, have them upload a selfie as well as their name card to a collaborative Google slide presentation for the entire class.

Having the ability to connect names to faces from the beginning will help you be significantly better prepared for the return to school, whenever that may occur.

I hope you found this information useful!

If you’d want this curriculum to be tailored specifically to your needs, you can find it here.

Do you want to keep this in mind for later? It’s perfect for your back-to-school bulletin board! Are you looking for more innovative ideas to use in your classroom? Subscribe to the Spark Creativity Teacher Podcast on iTunes or Google Play. or come hang out with me on Instagram and say hi!

I’m Betsy

Year after year, I used to have difficulty coming up with appropriate names. And I was quite disappointed in myself for having done so. During the first day of class, I would enthusiastically greet my new students and make plans for a productive start, but I would spend the following days obsessing about my pronunciation and double-checking my memory whenever I needed to call on someone in particular. That is no longer the case now. You may learn students’ names on the first night of school in a straightforward manner.

  1. The simple methods will be demonstrated in a moment, but first allow me to provide you with a brief summary of the two types.
  2. This exercise is available as a flexible curriculum in my TPT store (it is the most popular set in my store).
  3. Person-to-Person Instruction on Learning Names Create a name tent on card stock with each student, incorporating a couple of their favorite interests, quotations, books, and other items around their name if you’re in person to do it.
  4. Afterwards, I can take photographs of everyone holding their name cards and use them to help them study at home.
  5. On the internet, you may learn about names.
  6. Simply create a Google Slide for the project.
  7. It’ll then be screenshotted and dropped into a picture of themselves before being sent to you, giving you virtually exactly the same snapshot that you would have had to learn from if you’d taken a photo of them in class.
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As you can see, with any approach, you have the opportunity to begin to get to know each pupil, as well as to discover their name and other personal information.

Simple Procedures to Follow Brainstorm: Plan ahead of time what you’d like to know about your kids from the beginning of the school year.

Examples of such elements include: Formalize your thoughts into a template by completing the following: Use the lower half of a Powerpoint slide for in-person presentations if you have one (so you can fold it later).

You can simply use the shapes tool to construct boxes that include any information you want to add in the boxes.

For example, you may ask them to “Include your three favorite novels in the top left-hand box,” or something similar.

In person, you can make use of them: Using cardstock, print out the name tents (with instructions printed on the top half and a template printed on the bottom, so that it will show when you fold them) and let children to decorate them on the first day of school using any art tools they have available.

  1. Take pictures of each student with their card to use as study aids later on, and leave the cards out for at least the first week to create a simple and adaptable seating plan that can be changed every day.
  2. Finally, throughout the year, utilize the name tents to swiftly divide students into small groups before they come on group work days.
  3. For long distances, you can use them: On the first day, introduce yourself and provide a Google Slides presentation with instructions and templates to each student in their residence.
  4. Allow them to complete their templates in Google Slides before taking a snapshot (or saving as a PNG or JPG) of their name card.
  5. The ultimate result will be that you and everyone else will be able to see each kid with their name card on the slide, and you will all be able to begin becoming acquainted with one another.
  6. Are you ready to go?
  7. If you have any queries, please feel free to post them in the comments section below!

Interested in keeping this in mind for future reference? It’s perfect for your back-to-school bulletin board. Need more innovative ideas for your classroom? Check out these resources. The Spark Creativity Teacher Podcast may be found on iTunes. Alternatively, you may follow me on Instagram.

Name Tents

  • Rooms with desks that are too small for name tents will need 8.5 x 11 inch card board paper or blank clip-on badges. Sharpies® or other markers will be needed.

DIRECTIONS

  1. Distribute card stock and markers to the participants. You and the students should fold a piece of paper in half lengthwise and print their first and last names on the front and back of the cardstock
  2. Cards can be embellished as long as the name is clearly visible
  3. Nevertheless, At the beginning of class, name tents are set in front of each student. Everyone’s name should be pronounced correctly
  4. Tents should be collected at the conclusion of class and brought to each meeting. Carry a few extra cards to each lesson in case any kids inadvertently take one home.

PREFERRED PRONOUNS

In case you’re using the Cafe Talk Name Tent Template to make your name tents, these instructions will guide you through the process of folding the name tent correctly. A correctly folded name tent is secure, visually appealing, and reflective of a clear and rational mind. If your name tent was printed for you in advance of your speaking engagement at a Cafe Talk, steps 1-3 have most likely already been completed for you by the printer. Congratulations!

  1. To get the finest effects, print your name tent on card stock. Lightly score your name tent along the dashed score lines to make it stand out. Using the firm cut lines as a guide, make four 1/2-inch cuts into your name tent starting from the edges. Using the three scored lines (mountain folds, for you origami enthusiasts), fold your name tent in half. The bottom tabs should be slotted into each other in an alternate sequence (for example, if your outer tabs from one edge are on top, then the middle tab from that same edge should be on top, and so on). Glue the two bottom sides of the rectangle together.

After you’ve finished, you should have a sturdy, nicely folded name tent with a one-inch base. You’re all set to make your presentation! Take them out with a sledgehammer!

See also

The use of our reusable PVC table place name card holders is ideal for a variety of events including conferences, seminars, round-table networking events, exhibitions, conventions, dinners, receptions, and business meetings. The use of our tent place card holders allows you to assign and prominently display table places at events, as well as facilitate interaction between guests by enabling them to identify one another with a quick glance. Recycling PVC is a semi-rigid material that is scratch and abrasion resistant, as well as resilient and reusable.

Our tent card paper is perforated and pre-scored to make separating and folding after printing a cinch and to provide a professional appearance.

· Our free printable Microsoft Word place card templates, which can be used to create personalised card inserts that are single-sided or double-sided and may include images if desired, are available to download below.

Large Plastic Table Name

It has the following dimensions:210mm wide by 74.25mm high; it has a 60-degree opening angle; it is used with card insert stock (reference:in6.1) · ‘pc1.1’ is the product identification number. £22.00 ex VAT per pack of 25 holders (including VAT).

Small Plastic Table Name

Card insert stock is recommended for use with this product. Dimensions: 105mm wide x 49.5mm high 60 degree opening angle (reference:in6.2) · ‘pc1.2’ is the product reference. £22.00 ex VAT per pack of 25 holders (including VAT). A4 sheets are £20.00 ex VAT per box of 50. Dimensions: 210mm width x 74.25mm high 60 degree opening angle Product reference: ‘in6.1’

Large Name Tent

Product reference: ‘in6.2’ Dimensions: 105mm wide x 49.5mm high 60 degree opening angle Cases for Name Badge Organizer Display Trays and Cases for Name Badge Transportation Personalized A4 Name Badge Insert Sheets with Micro-Perforations Printing and production services are available.

Desk Name Tent

Desk Name Tent featuring the top 5 most popular themes Sharing your top 5 themes from the StrengthsFinder® assessment enhances cooperation as we become more familiar with one another. The Desk Name Tent in Cascadeis a straightforward visual representation of our company name and our top five topics. During a workshop session, the color-coded themes may be used to raise awareness and initiate dialogues about various topics. There is no need to use Word for mail merging; instead, Cascade can print the double-sided Name Tent immediately and rapidly from the program.

Include your company’s logo on the Name Tent.

Pick Insert from the menu bar, then Pictures, which is located under Illustrations, and then browse to and select your logo file from your computer’s hard drive.

After printing the sheet, fold it in three places as shown by the little lines, resulting in a triangular or tent shape. All are able to notice the name and themes since they are presented on both sides and are colored in the Domain colors.

Extra options with the Bonus Pack

With the top five themes for your desk name tent Sharing your top 5 themes from the StrengthsFinder® assessment improves teamwork as we become more familiar with one another’s personalities. A simple visual representation of our company name and our top five themes is provided by the Desk Name Tent inCascade. During a workshop session, the color-coded themes may be used to raise awareness and initiate dialogues about certain topics. There is no need to use Word for mail merging; instead, Cascade can print the double-sided Name Tent in a matter of minutes.

Customize the Name Tent with your company logo.

Personalized Name Tents Locate and open your logo file by selecting it from the Insert menu bar and then clicking on Pictures (which is located under Illustrations).

Create a triangle or tent shape by folding the sheet in thirds as indicated by the little lines after printing it.

Explore more features with Cascade

The presence of the themes on show gives hints as to how to approach the individual and is frequently used as a discussion starter regarding their strengths and weaknesses.

Language Options

The theme names are accessible in both English and Spanish as usual. The theme names are available in French, Spanish, and German as part of additional Language Packs.

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