What Is A Mongolian Tent Called

Yurt – Wikipedia

On a cart, a traditional Kazakh yurt is set up. In Khwarezm (or Karakalpakstan), Uzbekistan, a Qaraqalpaq bentwood type “yourte” is seen. On Central Asia, a traditionalyurt (from the Turkic languages) orger (Mongolian) is a movable, circular tent covered with skins or felt and used as a house by many diverse nomadic cultures that live in the steppes. The construction is composed of an angled assembly or latticework of wood or bamboo for the walls, a door frame, ribs (poles, rafters), and a wheel (crown, compression ring), which may have been steam-bent to achieve its shape.

The top of the wall of self-supporting yurts is stopped from expanding by a tension band, which opposes the force of the roof ribs and prevents the wall from spreading.

Etymology and translations

On a cart, a typical Kazakh yurt. In Khwarezm (or Karakalpakstan), Uzbekistan, a Qaraqalpaq bentwood type “yourte” is found. On Central Asia, a traditionalyurt (from the Turkic languages) orger (Mongolian) is a portable, circular tent covered with skins or felt and used as a house by several different nomadic cultures that live in the steppes. For the walls, the construction is made up of an angled assembly or latticework of wood or bamboo, a door frame, ribs (poles, rafters), and a wheel (crown, compression ring), which may have been steam- bent.

It is prevented from expanding at the top of the wall of self-supporting yurts by the use of a tension band, which opposes the force applied by the roof ribs.

Translations

  • In Azerbaijani, Turkish, and Bashkir languages, the word alaçq/alaçk/alasq is commonly used. In Mongolian, the word р (transliterated: ger,) literally means “house.” Yurt is referred to as тирм (transliterated as tirmä) in Bashkir. “Felt home” is the Kazakh term for “felt house,” which may be transliterated into English as “kiz y.” A kyrgyz name for “grey home” (boz üy) refers to the hue of the felt used in the construction
  • The term is translated as “grey house.” ak ö and gara ö () – In Turkish, the terms literally translate as “white house” and “black house,” respectively, depending on the level of luxury and elegance of the residence. qara u’y or otaw () – in Qaraqalpaq, the first phrase refers to a “black home,” while the second refers to “a newborn family,” and is exclusively used to refer to a yurt belonging to a young family. InHungarian, a yurt is referred to as “jurta”
  • In Bulgarian, a yurt is referred to as “yurta”
  • In Afghan, a yurt is referred to as “Kherga” or “Jirga”
  • InPersian, a yurt is referred to as “châdor”
  • InTajik, a yurt is referred to as “p In Russia, the AYaranga is a traditional movable housing that is similar to a tent that is used by several nomadic Northern indigenous peoples, such as the Chukchi and the Siberian Yupik.

History

Yurts have been a distinguishing aspect of life in Central Asia for at least three thousand years, according to historical records. The ancient Greek historian Herodotus is credited with providing the earliest documented account of a yurt being utilized as a home. Scythians, a horse-riding nomadic people who lived in the northern Black Sea and Central Asian region from around 600 BC to AD 300, were said to have lived in yurt-like tents, according to the historian Josephus.

Construction

Yurts in Afghanistan’s eastern provinces Yurts are traditionally constructed of an extending timber circular structure with a felt cover on top. Traditionally, felt is created from the wool of the sheep that follow the pastoralists on their journey. This is because the lumber used to construct the exterior building cannot be found on the treelesssteppes and must be acquired through trade in the valleys below. There are one or more expandinglatticewall-sections, a door-frame, bending roof poles, and a crown in the construction of the frame.

It is made of wood and is supported by felt pieces that are attached to the frame.

The frame is held together by one or more ropes or ribbons that go through it.

They change depending on the size and relative weight of the objects.

A yurt is constructed such that it may be deconstructed and the components transported on camels or yaks to be reassembled at a another location. The entire building process takes around 2 hours.

  • Mongolian Ger: beginning with the walls and door, and working your way up. Mongolian Ger: the roof poles are being installed for the first time. With the roof poles in place, the Mongolian Ger is complete. Placement of the thin inner cover on top of a Mongolian Ger’s roof. Mongolian Ger: a felt cover has been added. Addition of the outer cover to the Mongolian Ger A ger may be seen on the Steppes near Mandalgovi.

Decoration and symbolism

The traditional decorating of a yurt is mostly comprised of geometric patterns. These designs are often not based on personal preference, but are drawn from religious ornaments that contain particular symbolic meanings. The khas (swastika) and four powerful beasts (lion, tiger, garuda, and dragon) are among the most common symbols of strength, as are stylized representations of the five elements (fire, water, earth, metal, and wood), which are considered to be the fundamental, unchanging elements of the cosmos and are represented by the five elements.

  1. Geometric designs with repeating elements are also extensively employed.
  2. Unending power and continual movement are represented by this ornament, which is commonly employed as a border adornment.
  3. The khamar ugalz (nose pattern) and ever ugalz (horn pattern) are ancient designs that are taken from the form of the animal’s snout and horns, respectively.
  4. Not only can you see designs on the yurts themselves, but you can also find them on needlework, furniture, literature, clothes, doors, and other artifacts across the world.

In Central Asia

The Ak I (White Building), also known as “The World’s Largest Yurt,” is located 10 kilometers west of Mary, Turkmenistan, and was officially dedicated on November 27, 2015. Throughout Central Asian civilizations, the shangyrakor wooden yurt crown (Mongolian:тооно; Kazakh: ара; Kyrgyz: тyндк; Turkmen: tünük) is considered to be a symbol of the yurt’s importance. Even while the yurt itself was frequently repaired and rebuilt in traditional Kazakhstan villages, the shangyrak, which was passed down from father to son after the father’s death, remained intact.

An elongated version of the crown appears in the middle of Kazakhstan’s coat of arms, and it also appears as the primary motif on the flag of Kyrgyzstan.

Yurts may be found in a variety of settings, including cafés (particularly those that specialize in traditional cuisine), museums (particularly those connected to national culture), and tourist stores.

Turkmenistan national news agency states that “A white yurt is a symbol of an age-old, distinctive historical-cultural legacy, a statement of preservation of our roots and origins.” An theater with 3,000 seats is housed within this three-story edifice, which also features a café, offices, and VIP residences.

Buddhism in Mongolia

In Turkmenistan, the Aki (White Building), also known as “The World’s Largest Yurt,” is located 10 kilometers west of the city of Mary and was officially dedicated on November 27, 2015. Throughout Central Asian traditions, the shangyrakor wooden yurt crown (Mongolian:тооно; Kazakh: ара; Kyrgyz: тyндк; Turkmen: tünük) is regarded as a sacred object. Even if the yurt itself was frequently repaired and rebuilt in traditional Kazakhstan villages, the shangyrak, which was passed down from father to son after the father’s death, would stay intact.

  • The coat of arms of Kazakhstan features a stylised version of the crown in the middle, while the main motif on the flag of Kyrgyzstan is the crown.
  • Yurts may be found in a variety of settings, including cafés (particularly those that specialize in traditional cuisine), museums (particularly those connected to national culture), and gift stores.
  • The structure, known as Ak I (White Building) and dubbed “The World’s Largest Yurt,” was dedicated as “The World’s Largest Yurt” by the Turkmen government.
  • According to the Turkmenistan national news agency, “a white yurt is a symbol of an age-old, distinctive historical-cultural legacy, as well as a statement of the preservation of our roots and origins.

Westernization

In different nations, yurt enthusiasts have modified the aesthetic concept of the yurt, which is a spherical, semi-permanent tent. Although such structures may be based on the originals found in Central Asia to some extent, they frequently include some unique architectural elements to allow them to be used in a variety of climates and environments. Yurts are constructed using high-tech materials in Canada and the United States. They are extremely well-engineered and constructed to withstand adverse weather conditions.

  1. These North American yurts are best referred to as yurt derivations rather than yurts themselves, as they are no longer spherical felt dwellings that are simple to erect, disassemble, and carry.
  2. Douglas’s visit to Mongolia in that year.
  3. Yurts are also popular in northern Canada, particularly in the Yukon.
  4. Since then, at least 17 more states in the United States have included yurt camping in their own park systems.
  5. These tents are made from local hardwood and are frequently modified for usage in a wetter climate by including steeper roof profiles and water-resistant fabric.
  6. At least two glamping sites in Somerset and Dorset are using yurts that were manufactured in the United Kingdom and have a metal frame.
  7. Pallozas are characterized by stone walls and a conical roof constructed of rye stalks.
  8. Yurts are offered for rent in various Canadian provincial parks and state parks in a number of US states for those who want to camp permanently.

German youth and Scouting organisations have used a form of the yurt and the Samilavvu (Kohte) from the late 1920s, as documented in the German articlede:Schwarzzelte der deutschen Jugendbewegung.

See also

Fans of the yurt, which is an oval, semi-permanent tent with a circular roof, have altered the aesthetic concept to suit their own cultures. They may be based on the ancient constructions found in Central Asia to some extent, but they frequently incorporate some unique architectural elements to make them more suitable for a variety of climates and applications. Yurts are built using high-tech materials in Canada and the United States. Extreme weather conditions do not phase them, as they are well designed and constructed.

  • North American yurts are best referred to as yurt derivations rather than yurts themselves because they are no longer spherical felt dwellings that are simple to erect, disassemble, and move.
  • Douglas’s visit to Mongolia in the previous decade.
  • As well as in Northern Canada, yurts are very popular.
  • Since then, at least 17 other states in the United States have included yurt camping in their own park systems.
  • These tents are constructed of localhardwood and are frequently modified for usage in a wetter climate by including steeper roof profiles and water-resistant fabric materials.
  • At least two glamping sites in Somerset and Dorset are using yurts produced in the United Kingdom with a metal frame.
  • Stone walls surround the palloza, which is covered with rye stalks and has a conical ceiling.
  • Yurts are offered for rent in various Canadian provincial parks and state parks in a number of states in the United States.
  • Mongolian architecture
  • The flag of Kyrgyzstan
  • The Ger district
  • The igloo
  • A list of human dwelling types
  • The Mausoleum of Theodoric
  • The tent
  • The tipi
  • The yaranga
  • Vernacular architecture
  • And other housing options.

References

  1. “Yurt.” Nişanyan Sözlük is a Turkish word that means “tent.” Australia, Project SafeCom, Western Australia
  2. Retrieved on August 24, 2020. Ger (dwelling house) – Memidex dictionary/thesaurus.
  3. A detailed guide to creating a Mongolian Ger, website, accessed October 23, 2011
  4. Van der Haegan, Bernard. “Mongolian Gers or Yurts: Heritage of Nomadic Peoples.”
  5. “Ger ornamentation in the Mongolian style.” This is a service provided by Boston Star Consulting. On October 27, 2011, the following articles were published: “Turkmenistan’s Latest Folly: Humongous Yurt”. November 3, 2015
  6. “Turkmenistan’s Latest Folly: Humongous Yurt”. November 28, 2015
  7. “Turkmenistan’s Latest Folly: Humongous Yurt”. November 3, 2015
  8. “Turkmenistan retrieved on 2019-11-21
  9. Yurts at Ontario Parks, website, May 15, 2018
  10. Retrieved on 2019-11-21

External links

  • Media related to Yurtsat may be found on Wikimedia Commons. It is possible to get information on yurts and associated constructions at Yurt Info. In the Yurt Forum, you may find information about yurts and similar structures. Yurt – World History Encyclopedia
  • Yurt – World History Encyclopedia
  • Mongolia Ger is a term used to describe a country in Mongolia. (Yurt in Mongolia)
  • Mike Lusmore created a timelapse video of yurt building at Blackdown Yurts in Devon, England. Yurts of the Nomadic Chahar People, from Afghanistan. The Chinese province of Inner Mongolia was founded in 1874. Experts provide advice on yurt life.

Life in Mongolia

ByKoryo Tours, Inc. Everything you need to know about Mongolian gers is in this article. Mongolia is the world’s 18th biggest country, the second largest landlocked country, and the seventh largest country in terms of land area. It is a huge expanse of diversified forest and desert that has remained mostly unknown and underestimated for far too long. With sheep outnumbering people by a factor of 35 to 1, you may be sure to beat the throng and venture far from the usual route to find solitude.

  1. In other words, what exactly is a Mongolianger?
  2. No, not at all.
  3. Mongolian ancient history is difficult to study about since, before to the arrival of Genghis Khan, nothing had been documented or written.
  4. The ger was first mentioned about 600 BC by Herodotus, who is widely considered to as the “forefather of travel.” No one knows for certain when the ger first appeared on the scene.
  5. With the exception of the roof and how it is constructed, the only noticeable difference between a yurt tent and a Mongolianger is their size.
  6. The roof beams will be oriented upwards, but the roof of a Mongolian g er will be oriented flat.
  7. If you’re in a conventional yurt, you won’t have as many difficulties once you’ve gotten in through the entrance.

Typically, it will be a single family living in oneger and transporting their cattle.

Otherwise, the soil would be ruined by an excess of animals and temporary tents.

Instead, they leave before something like this happens.

It is only during the Naadam festival that you will see a large number of Mongoliangers congregating together.

Collaboration is crucial in Mongolian nomad culture, and duties within the family are clearly defined, even if everyone will ultimately assist one other in their endeavors.

It is the husband’s responsibility to regulate the temperature of the home and to provide general care during inclement weather conditions.

Women are seen as the brains and heart of theger.

This will ensure that the construction of theger is not compromised.

Putting your Mongolianger together The first thing you’ll need to do before putting up yourgeris is collect a group of people, at the very least one or two.

You’ll then need: wood beams (for the structure of theger); felt (for the first insulation layer – this is often made from sheep’s wool); animal skin or canvas for the outside layer (sometimes you will seegerthat use plastic for the outside layer, but this isn’t as good for waterproofing); and material for theger ‘s ‘skirt’, which offers rain protection.

  1. They can be pulled down in as little as half an hour (if necessary), but it usually takes a little longer.
  2. It is then put onto 4×4 or pick-up vehicles in order to be transported to the next destination.
  3. How to Purchase a Mongolianger A Mongolianger may be purchased for between $500 and $600 USD, however the price can increase significantly depending on the materials used and how the Mongolianger is ornamented.
  4. A fully equipped Mongolianger will cost you more than $6,000 USD.
  5. The good news is that if you properly care for your Mongolianger, it will be able to remain in your family for many years and be passed down to future generations.
  6. Mongolians are highly environmentally conscious and do not want to throw things away.
  7. You have little choice but to recycle when you’re stuck in the middle of the Gobi desert with nothing to do but wait.
See also:  How To Make A Tent From Pvc Pipe

A Mongolianger is not impervious to water.

The water will fall to the sides as a result of the design of theger’s construction.

If it snows severely, snow can accumulate on the roof’s eaves and cause the roof to cave in, causing it to collapse.

It goes without saying that their father or grandfather will be close by to make sure they don’t fall!

Each one is uniquely adorned and furnished to reflect its individual personality.

For example, the right hand side of the geris is often the woman’s side, whereas the left hand side is typically the man’s side.

This involves maintaining certain goods in the same locations for the sake of convenience and accessibility.

Is it chilly in the Mongolianger during the winter?

As a matter of fact, Ulan Bator has the distinction of being the world’s coldest capital city, with temperatures as low as -45 degrees Celsius.

This is all due to meticulous planning and the design of the Mongolianger, which is particularly noteworthy when compared to the conventional yurt.

The fire will be maintained burning throughout the day in order to maintain a steady temperature inside.

It is then shut off for the night, but the yurt stays warm since it has absorbed all of the heat that has been absorbed throughout the day.

It might be pretty cool in the mornings before the fire has been built – but it quickly warms up!

To gather it, the youngest member of the family walks outside with a fork with a long handle and a basket.

What is the best way for me to stay in a traditional Mongolianger?

Check out our Mongoliaatours, which all include a stay in a Mongolianger and will provide you with the true, ethical experience you’re looking for!

Yurt

Kyo Tours provided the following information: There is all you need to know about Mongolian gers right here! Mongolia is the world’s 18th biggest country, the second largest landlocked country, and the seventh largest country in terms of land area. It is a huge expanse of diversified forest and desert that has remained largely unknown and underestimated for much of its history. The fact that sheep outnumber people 35 to 1 means you can avoid the throng and travel far from the usual track. A few significant cities, such as the capital Ulaanbaatar (Ulan Bator), dot the landscape of this ancient nomad country, but for the most part, the Mongolian people roam and live in Mongolian tents, known as Mongolian gers, throughout their lives.

  • It appears to be nothing more than an old-fashioned yurt, though.
  • Despite the fact that the Mongol tent is comparable to the classic yurt tent, they have fundamental differences that date back hundreds of years or more.
  • It is therefore difficult to trace theger’s origins or determine its historical significance.
  • In what ways do a conventional yurt tent and a Mongolian ger vary from one another?
  • Despite the fact that they are both spherical buildings supported by wood beams, the traditional yurt tent has a considerably higher ceiling, making it less effective at staying warm throughout the winter season.
  • You’ll probably have to bend down quite a bit in a Mongolian get if you’re over six feet tall and frequently find yourself bumping your head against low door frames.
  • A big group of nomadic Mongolians will rarely be seen together; instead, they prefer to travel as a family unit.

It is critical that one place does not get overcrowded; otherwise, the land would be ruined by an overabundance of cattle and tents, as land can only support a specific number of people at a given time and location.

But they don’t wait for it to happen; instead, they go on.

A large number of Mongolians only congregate for a single event during the Naadam festival.

Working together as a team is fundamental in Mongolian nomad culture, and the duties of the family are well defined, yet everyone will ultimately assist everyone else.

During inclement weather, the spouse is in charge of keeping the house at a comfortable temperature and providing general care.

It is believed that women are the leaders of thegers.

In most families, the grandparents’ primary responsibility is to watch over and care for the children.

You can’t put up a Mongoliangerby by yourself, and it’s definitely ideal if you have at least two other people with you to assist you out with the setup.

Due to the fact that Mongoliangers are simple to up and dismantle, they have become extremely popular among Mongolia’s numerous nomadic populations, who migrate about three or four times each year.

In a Mongolianger, the furniture is designed in a box-like manner, which can be readily folded down into boxes for transit convenience.

The horses or yaks pulling the sled were traditionally used for this.

It is possible to purchase a Mongolianger for between $500 and $600 USD, however the price might increase significantly depending on the materials used and how the Mongolianger is ornamented.

A fully equipped Mongolianger would set you back around $6,000 USD.

If you take proper care of your Mongolianger, it will be able to remain in your family for many years and be passed down to future generations of Mongoliangers.

Mongolians are highly environmentally conscious and do not want to throw things away.

With few options when you’re stuck in the midst of a desert, recycling is the only option.

Unlike other animals, a Mongolianger is not water resistant.

The water will fall to the sides as a result of the design of theger.

a.

After then, it will be up to the youngest member of the family to scrape the snow off the roof, which will be done by the tiniest of the family.

No two Mongoliangers are same on the inside, and this is a guarantee.

But there are some aspects of everyger that have remained the same across time, mostly for practical and cultural reasons.

Considering that women are in charge of preparing the family’s meals on a regular basis, it seems sense that the kitchen is on the right.

In addition to serving as storage, the spokes of the wood beams that hold the structure together are frequently seen with pouches hanging from them to keep various items.

Mongolians are accustomed to experiencing very cold temperatures.

As a result, how can you stay warm if you don’t have central heating or hot water bottles?

With a flat, low roof, the Mongoliangerdesign is able to trap the heat within.

The top flap may be opened and closed to regulate the temperature of the refrigerator.

To remain warm in bed, thermal underwear is worn, and blankets are thick and heavy to keep you warm and out of the elements.

Animal feces is used to provide the tinder for the fire.

Once it has been dry, it may be applied to the skin.

When you visit Mongolia for the first time, staying in a Mongolianger is an experience you will never forget.

It is also an excellent opportunity to acquire a feel for the Mongolian nomadic way of living. Consider one of ourMongoliatours, which all include an overnight stay in a Mongolianger, to obtain the true, ethical experience you want!

Name

It is believed that nomadic pastoralist peoples of northern East Asia have been using yurt tents since before written records were kept. As semi-temporary dwellings, they were both practical and light enough to carry when tribes moved on with their herds in search of other pastures in the area. Westerners are better familiar with the term yurt, which comes from the Russian word yurta (circle tent). However, the Russian name itself is derived from the Turkic wordjurt, which literally translates as ‘people’ or ‘land’ in which they live and wander.

DesignMaterials

Historically, nomadic pastoralist peoples of northern East Asia have lived in yurt tents long before written records were created. As semi-temporary dwellings, they were both practical and light enough to carry when tribes moved on with their herds in search of greener pastures in the wilderness. Westerners are better familiar with the term yurt, which comes from the Russian word yurta (meaning tent). However, the Russian phrase itself is derived from the Turkic wordjurt, which literally translates to ‘people’ or ‘land’ in which they live and move about in.

To cure and preserve the nomad’s cheese, the flattish top of the yurt proved to be an excellent location.

Yurt Camps

Despite the fact that a family can create a yurt in less than an hour and that it can be quickly transported on a horse, camel, or cart, there was (and still is) an even more handy option available at the time. It was thekhibitkha(orgertergen) that was observed in the medieval period, which was a form of yurt that was permanently fixed upon a cart and used for transportation. A big team or perhaps multiple teams of yoked oxen might be necessary to move these very wide carts, which could be quite heavy when fully loaded.

  1. Other accounts tell of Shiremun, the grandson of Ogedei Khan (r.
  2. However, there is archaeological evidence to suggest that even after conquering towns, the nomadic Mongols occasionally put up their yurts within the city walls to protect themselves from being attacked.
  3. Similarly, more senior families in a tribe may have many yurts apiece, which might be utilized to accommodate various members of the society in separate locations, such as elder children, bodyguards, servants, and junior spouses.
  4. Do you enjoy history?
  5. For more common nomads, the traditional method of setting up camp consisted in erecting a perimeter circle of yurts, within which the tribe’s vehicles and cattle were stationed.
  6. The imperial encampment, where the khan himself was present, appear to have been set up in the opposite manner, with the carts creating an outside square perimeter around the yurts within.

It was eventually used to refer to any walled camp, and then to the basic social and military unit of the Mongol Empire, known as the ‘thousand,’ which was also known as the amingan (thousand). Khibitkha, often known as a wagon yurt, was built by Omer Karamollaoglu. (Creative Commons Attribution)

The Evolution of Yurts

The yurt was unquestionably important to the well-being of a family, yet there was an odd tradition among the Mongols that the youngest son received his father’s yurt as well as his personal belongings. It was precious even to have an ordinary yurt, but by the time the Mongols had established their empire, some of these tents had developed into magnificent works of art in their own right. In addition to being typically white on the surface owing to a layer of chalk or clay, or powdered bone, they were richly adorned on the interior with goldbrocade, diamonds, and pearls, with beautiful carpets serving as the flooring.

  • A yurt was the home of Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire, during his rule.
  • Kublai Khan (r.
  • There was another set of tents in Beijing, where the Khan went one step farther and recreated a whole steppe ecosystem by transporting tons of steppe dirt, plants, and even robotic tigers into the city.
  • Yurts continued to be utilized in urban contexts for a variety of purposes, including banquets, formal audiences, as guest homes, and as birthing rooms for expectant mothers.

Yet, yurts, in addition to their appeal to tourists who want to experience life in a traditional setting for a while, are still in use by nomadic peoples in places like the Gobi desert for their practical functionality, even if they now have glitzy additions such as aluminum chimneys and solar panels.

Prior to publication, this paper was checked for correctness, dependability, and conformance to academic standards by two independent reviewers.

MONGOLIAN GER

The Mongolian Ger tent is a one-of-a-kind technical marvel – a clever constructed dwelling. It is mostly constructed of wood and other readily available materials, such as wood, sheep wool felt, and animal hair ropes, among other things. It can be moved on camelback or by truck because it is readily erected and disassembled in a short period of time. Mongolians now carry their gers on narrow pathways, rather than horses. The lower half of the ger is made up of sections of trellis-like wood walls, with the entryway set within a frame that runs the length of the structure.

  • Roof poles might be as many as 108 in number, depending on the size of the ger (a sacred Buddhist number).
  • The roof ring is the most difficult component of the ger construction to construct.
  • The first rays of the morning sun signal the start of milking and pasturing animals.
  • For protection against inclement weather, a piece of felt or canvas known as Urkh is placed over the single roof “ring window.” When putting up the ger, there is an unique protocol to follow.
  • Then, because they are too large to fit through the entrance, the building is built around them to accommodate them.
  • According to old custom, each object in the Mongolian yurt interior has a precise location within the yurt.
  • The roof ring is left open for ventilation.
  • Canvas is used to waterproof the ger.
  • In the summer, the wall felt may be pulled up from the ground level to allow for more ventilation.

The Mongolian ger tent is erected on the ground, and the floor space is covered with carpets unless the ger is intended to remain in situ for an extended period of time, in which case a hardwood floor is installed.

Mongolia ger size

Throughout Central Asia, Mongolian Gers have been a distinguishing part of daily life. There are some old rock paintings that demonstrate that the gers/yurts were utilized by the ancient inhabitants around 10 thousand years ago. Over the millennia, nomads have made use of this folding shelter. The ger is the most appropriate dwelling for a nomadic lifestyle. Since the 13th century, when Genghis Khan’s Great Mongolia Empire ruled Mongolia, the Mongolian ger has been put to the greatest possible use.

  1. The Mongolian ger took on its current shape and look around the 16th century.
  2. Nomadic herders and sedentary people equally make their homes in gers, which have four to five walls.
  3. Depending on where they are, Mongolian nomads may live in a variety of ger configurations.
  4. The willow tree ger is small and easy to transport.
  5. As a result of their reduced mobility and larger families, the inhabitants of western Mongolia live in larger gers.
See also:  What Are Tent Poles Made Of

Mongolian ger interior

The north side is considered to be the most important. The family shrine is placed on a table in front of the altar. Stacks of colorful cushions, blankets, and nicely folded bedclothes are arranged near to the east and west ends of the room, where the beds will remain for the night. Everything is maintained neat and orderly. The labor equipment, such as saddle and gear, is kept in the west front of the ger (the man’s side), and the calfskin sack, which is used specifically for fermenting mare’s milk, is kept next to it (airbag).

  1. In addition, find a cabinet for utensils for cooking and consuming meals.
  2. In addition to providing heat, this stove also acts as a cooking surface.
  3. The entire family lives, sleeps, and eats within the ger, which provides no privacy.
  4. By the gers of the nomads, you will observe a solar panel and a satellite antenna installed.
  5. They installed a sink on the west side of the ger’s entrance door, which they use to wash their hands and faces.

During the hotter seasons, the sink is moved outside for hygiene reasons. In this room, you can discover the old wood frames painted in bright orange and blue colors. The colors orange and blue represent the sun, moon, and fire, respectively, while the color blue represents the sky.

MONGOLIA – Yurts of Mongolian nomads: description and history

It is customary for nomadic families in Mongolia to live in theyurts, which are referred to as Gerby by the locals. It is made up of a number of orange meshwalls that are all the same size and curved. The size of the yurt is determined by the number of walls it has; in typically, 3 to 5 walls are used, resulting in a floor space ranging from 15 to 30m2. In the center of the yurt, two central poles, which are likewise orange and frequently heavily painted with motifs, support a circle of wood that acts as the ridge at the top of the yurt’s roof.

  • It is covered with a felt covering whose thickness fluctuates according on the season, which is produced by the walls, center posts, the circle, and the ceiling of slats that make up the wooden construction.
  • We noticed an internal temperature of around 25 degrees inside the theyurt in February, owing to the combined benefits of the felt and the stove, despite outside temperatures of -40 degrees!
  • The entire construction is supported by lengthy straps made of braided horsehair that run the length of it.
  • The residents of the yurt are protected from the cold and dampness of the earth by a hardwood floor and carpets installed inside.

Furnishing of a traditional Mongolian yurt

The furniture of traditional Mongolian yurts is painted in orange, just like the rest of the timber building, and has brightly colored symbolic motifs inspired by nature. Both to the left and right of the entryway are beds that may also be utilized as sofas. You can locate a third bed or a cabinet directly opposite the entrance, where you can frequently find the family altar, as well as portraits and things to which the family is particularly attached. The coffee table and tiny stools are located on the opposite side of the room from the entryway, on the opposite side of the center pillars.

If there is a little cabinet with a sink and a water reserve to the left of the entry door, you can wash your hands there before entering the theyurt, which is occasionally available.

The sun shines down from heaven in a very natural and pleasant manner!

History of Mongolian yurt

Theyurtis has been in this form for generations, since since Guillaume deRubrouck, writing in the 13th century in his bookTravels in the Easterncountries, described it as follows: “These people build their homes on wheels, with braided rods serving as the walls of their dwellings. The walls of the home are enclosed at the top, producing the roof of the structure. They are covered with white felt, which is frequently dusted with lemon or bone powder to give them a glistening sheen. They occasionally place a black felt covering over the roof opening, which is embellished with exquisite motifs based on various themes.

During that period, which was defined by several conquering battles, yurts could be transported on big carts drawn by yaks, allowing for more convenient travel without the need to deconstruct and reassemble them, even if the process is rather quick.

Symbolism of Mongolian Yurt

This sort of theyurtis has been in existence for hundreds of years, ever since Guillaume deRubrouck described it in his bookTravels in the Easterncountries in the 13th century as follows: “They build their dwellings on wheels and use weaved rods as walls to keep the elements out. In the top of the home, the walls are enclosed, making the roof. White felt is used to cover them, and it is frequently dusted with lemon or bone powder to provide a glimmer. It is not uncommon for them to place a black felt covering over the opening in the ceiling, which is covered with exquisite drawings on various subjects.

The Yurts could be transported on big carts drawn by yaks during that period, which was defined by multiple conquering battles.

Orientation of the yurt in Mongolia

Orientation is a response to specific commands or instructions. The door of the temple should open to the south in Mongolia, but the door of the temple should open to the east among the Altaic peoples. This discrepancy in orientation might be explained by a number of different factors. The first thinks that all people put the sun at the entrance to theyurtto, with the Mongols adopting the solar star at its zenith, rather than sunrise, as the entry to theyurtto. Second, the Mongols would be pitted against the peoples of the south, who have been their historical opponents for ages, according to the history and culture of the Mongols.

Is it a Ger or Yurt – About Mongolian tents

Is it a ger or a yurt, exactly? What do you name the Mongolian tents, by the way? The solution is straightforward. A ger, which is a Mongolian tent, is shown here. A yurt is a tent that is transported from Russia, Kazakhstan, or Turkey.

What is a ger?

In Central Asia, a number of nomadic tribes live together in a semipermanent round-the-clock residential existence. Russia, Turkey, and other countries are all home to them, each in their own way. When compared to our concrete castles, we prefer to refer to this as tent houses, which can accommodate a number of people. Keep in mind that although Western Europe was locked in the Middle Ages for hundreds of years, rich cultures blossomed in the East throughout that time period. The level of life in these residences, where up to 15 people may be found in one place, was quite high, and continues to be so now.

What is a yurt?

The term Yurt is one that we come across in both Turkey and Russia. Yurt is a Turkish word that meaning “dormitory.” In Mongolia, we refer such dwellings as Gers. Gers are quite popular and are becoming increasingly valued throughout Europe. Where there is often a Mongolian origin and construction with a round crown in the centre where the roof poles to support the roof are located. Ger is the owner of all of these. However, they may be found anywhere.

The grasslands of the Central Asian steppes may be quite windy, therefore having this ability comes in useful. The wind also states that you are constantly in good spirits when you are with Ger. Yurt is translated as “Sleep Stay” in Turkish. means ‘House’ in Mongolian and is pronounced Ger.

What does a Ger or Yurt look?

A Yurt and a Ger are both circular structures. It is a wooden contraption in the shape of a checkerboard stage-gate system, the kind that you and others have used in your performances. To build the walls, you slide four, five, or six of those walls against each other in a circle, sliding them against each other. The roof beams that come together in the middle of the crown are then supported by this structure. In a Ger, the top of the tent is supported by two enormous poles that go across the center of the tent.

  1. In many cases, there are no poles in the middle.
  2. With the onset of communism and the rise of Russian domination, a standard German language has formed.
  3. The proportions and architecture of this structure still serve as the foundation for the modern Ger.
  4. Furthermore, Ger has always been associated with the southern entrance; Ger relocates two to four times a year, on average.
  5. Then so be it, it may as well be a Yurt!
  6. Drinking salted milk thee in Ger is a tradition.

Where you buy a yurt or ger?

Do you wish to live in a ger (german hut)? This is a good concept. It is a unique way of life that you will derive great pleasure and satisfaction from. Froid is the one who created the Ger that we are in. There is a workshop in Ulanbatar, Mongolia’s capital, where they are made. During our time in Mongolia, we carefully selected the Gers, which we then transported to the Netherlands in a container. As a result, they purposefully crossed the Trans-Siberian Railroad. They are genuine Gers who are still alive and well.

You can clearly notice the flawless finish.

Never be in a rush.

Never rush through it; it’s well worth your time to read and get the answers to your questions!

Overnight in a Mongolian Ger

Would you want to spend a night in a Mongolian Ger to get a feel for the experience?

You are more than welcome to stay in one of our Gers. Here you may learn about the various sites and their availability. That is, of course, if you want to have a good time! On the Veluwe, there is Ger.

What is a Mongolian Ger — Young Pioneer Tours

Few things are more evocative of the Mongolian nomad culture than the white spherical tents that dot the Mongolian grasslands. The classic Mongol hut is one of those things. But what exactly is a Mongolian Ger, and where did it come from? Allow us at YPT to take you on a journey through a Mongolian Ger.

What is a Ger

A Mongolian Ger (also known as a Yurt outside of Mongolia) is a spherical tent that can be swiftly erected and dismantled in order to be carried according to the demands of nomads traveling around the country. Generally speaking, a Ger is constructed of a few wooden columns that are then covered with a felt-covered tarp. A circular entrance is cut into the centre of the roof of the Ger to allow for the lighting of a fire in the center of the hut, with the smoke rising from the opening in the middle of the roof.

While there are currently Gers manufactured entirely of plastic, original Gers were constructed entirely of natural materials.

Gers are often only equipped with one door, which is typically located on the south side of the building.

A single room, the Ger may be used as a living room, a bedroom, a kitchen, and a dining room at the same time!

History of the Ger

Outside of Mongolia, a Mongolian Ger (also known as a yurt) is a spherical tent that can be swiftly erected and disassembled to be transported according to the demands of nomads. For the most part, a Ger is constructed of a few wooden columns that are then covered with a felt-covered tarp. It is customary to cut a circular opening in the centre of the Ger’s roof in order to allow a fire to be set in the center of the hut, with smoke rising from the opening. Whereas nowadays there are Gers manufactured of plastic, traditionally, Gers were constructed from materials that the Mongol people could forage for in the wild.

Both animal skins and ropes are used to bind the building together.

With no internal barriers, a Ger allows the entire family to remain together without the need for division or seclusion.

Customs involving Gers

When entering a Ger, it is considered proper etiquette for males to enter from the left and for ladies to enter from the right. When traveling around the Ger, it is vital to walk through it in the opposite direction as the clock. Because of the Mongols’ Buddhist ancestry, this is the case (the same happens when Buddhist go around temples) When entering a Ger, it is recommended that you keep your hat on. In Mongolia, it is forbidden to throw trash into a fire since fire is considered sacred. Throwing rubbish in the middle of the Ger is, of course, an acceptable practice.

When you first walk through the door, they will very certainly offer you tea and some small nibbles.

For example, even if you are not hungry, you should nevertheless nibble on whatever food is served to you since failing to do so would be regarded quite disrespectful.

The failure to do so would convey the message to your host that they are not doing a good job of hosting you because they are not supplying enough heat for you to feel comfortable.

In the event that you are wandering near a Ger and have not yet been spotted or invited in, make your presence known by welcoming anyone in the vicinity of the Ger. The fact is that some Mongolians have guard dogs, and approaching a Ger without first being invited might result in disaster!

Hang out in Ger with Mongol nomads as part of our yearlytour of Mongolia!

Pier works as the regional manager for YPT’s operations in Africa and the Middle East. Whenever he isn’t blasting his way through the night on top of iron ore trains in Mauritania or battling off iguanas in Socotra, he likes to talk about the revolutionary history of China or sing pop songs in an intolerably high-pitched voice in his spare time.

Ancient Mongolia for Kids – GERS (Ghers, Yurts, Yerts, Tent Homes)

A ger (also known as a yurt) is a Mongolian tent that serves as a house. Assume you live in a house that is 9 feet high and 15 feet around, and it is shaped like a piece of candy (a Hershey’s kiss). Actually, a ger can appear to be a bit strange, but they were quite comfy. Giants, also known as gers, are hollow balls that have been sliced in half, with the flat surface of one half resting on the ground. Each ger has a single entryway, no windows, and a little peak at the top to allow smoke to escape when necessary.

  • Every ger was constructed in the same manner.
  • To go into the ger, you had to cross the threshold rather than walk through it.
  • Moving around inside was considered bad luck if you did it in the opposite direction of the clock.
  • Mongolians continue to live in this form of house to this day.
  • A Yurt is a temporary structure.
See also:  How To Keep A Roof Top Tent Warm

How Yurts Work

GER (also known as yurt) is a Mongolian tent that serves as a place of residence. Assume you live in a house that is 9 feet high and 15 feet around and has the appearance of a piece of candy (a Hershey’s kiss). Despite the fact that gers appeared to be strange, they were really rather comfy. Giants, also known as gers, are hollow balls that have been sliced in half, with the flat side of each half resting on the ground. A single entryway and no windows are provided in each ger, with a small opening at the top to allow smoke to escape.

It was the same manner for every ger to be put up.

The ger could only be entered by crossing the threshold, not by walking through the doorway.

Traveling counterclockwise was considered bad luck while moving around the interior of the building.

Mongolians are still living in this form of house today. A Yurt in Mongolia A Yurt is a traditional shelter. In this section, you will find information on the Mongols and their culture.

Yurt Structure

The yurt is constructed in an inventive manner. Even while it may be dismantled into a few small, lightweight parts for transportation, when fully erected, it can withstand even the strongest winds. A yurt in Japan was even able to withstand a tornado that destroyed the nearby homes. The walls of a yurt are constructed of wood, such as hazel or willow, and are comprised of a few latticed sections that unfold like an accordion to create the structure. These are joined and fastened together to create a circle, with enough space to accommodate a door frame.

  1. Yurts have domed or conical roofs with a circle at the top and rafters that radiate down to meet the walls on each side.
  2. An enormous tension band is used to connect everything together on the exterior of the yurt, which gives the structure its incredible strength.
  3. Additionally, due of the form of the construction, it is particularly wind resistant because the wind can flow around it rather than getting caught on the walls and corners of the building.
  4. Mongolians have long depended on the wool of their sheep to create felt covers for their homes and livestock.
  5. Weight and water absorption are two disadvantages of the handmade cloth, which is why yurt producers nowadays employ canvas or vinyl for the wall coverings.
  6. In Mongolia, nomads are permitted to just lay down thick rugs and mats on the ground.
  7. If you’re taller than 6 feet (1.8 meters), you may find yourself stooping a little, however contemporary yurt builders may be able to expand the walls as an extra convenience.
  8. Because the yurt does not require internal support, it is possible to utilize the whole interior area.
  9. If you want additional space, you might put multiple yurts together to create a 30-foot yurt, which is on the larger half of the yurt spectrum.
  10. Even in Central Asia, Mongolian gers are distinguished from Turkic gers, which are constructed of bent poles that are long enough to serve as both walls and roof.

Yurt producers in North America began employing a variety of textiles for the walls and aviation cables for the tension band as soon as the yurt made its way to the continent. What’s it like inside a conventional yurt, you might wonder. Turn the page to find out what it’s like to visit Mongolia.

Mongolian Yurts

Despite its simple design, the yurt is quite functional. However, when completed, it is capable of withstanding even the strongest gusts. It may be transported in a few lightweight parts for convenience. A yurt in Japan even managed to withstand a tornado that destroyed the nearby homes. Wooden yurt walls, such as those made of hazel or willow, are constructed from a few latticed sections that unfold like an accordion to provide shelter. Each of these is built and fastened together to make a circle, with enough space to accommodate a door frame.

  1. Yurts have domed or conical roofs with a circle at the top and rafters that radiate down to meet the walls on all sides.
  2. An enormous tension band is used to hold everything together on the outside of the yurt, which gives the structure its incredible strength and durability.
  3. Additionally, due of the design of the construction, it is particularly wind resistant since the wind can flow around it rather than getting stuck on the walls and corners of the structure.
  4. For centuries, Mongolians have relied on the wool of their sheep to create felt covers for their homes and livestock.
  5. Weight and water absorption are two disadvantages of the handmade cloth, which is why yurt makers now employ canvas or vinyl for the wall coverings on their structures.
  6. A thick rug or a mat on the ground is all that the nomads need in Mongolia.
  7. Although contemporary yurt builders may be able to stretch the walls as an extra feature, if you’re over 6 feet (1.8 meters), you may find yourself leaning over.
  8. Given that there is no internal support required, the yurt may make use of all of its available interior space.
  9. If you want additional space, you might put multiple yurts together to make a 30-foot yurt, which is on the larger half of the yurt spectrum.
  10. The Turkic gers, which employ bent poles that are long enough to serve as both the walls and the roof, are distinct from Mongolian gers, which are found even in Central Asia.

In a traditional yurt, what does it feel like to be in there? Change pages and you’ll find yourself on an adventure in Mongolia.

From Camping Yurts to Luxury Yurts: The Yurt Today

Yurts first appeared on the North American landscape in the 1960s. An East Coaster named Bill Coperthwaite was inspired by photographs of gers published in National Geographic and used his dissertation as a chance to construct the buildings in his backyard. As a result of their experience living in the Oregon forests and planting trees, a group known as the Hoedads recognized that the structure fit their way of life. As a result of their collaboration, Bill Coperthwaite founded the Yurt Foundation, which in turn inspired others to establish the first yurt manufacturing enterprises in North America, including the Hoedads.

  1. According to one manufacturer, there are around 10,000 yurts in use across North America at any given time.
  2. The trend began in Oregon, when parks manager Craig Tutor was inspired by yurts on display at the Oregon State Fair and purchased several for use in state park facilities.
  3. When the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department conducted a study in 2003, yurt users stated that the building made camping much more enjoyable because of advantages such as heat, a dry shelter, and convenience.
  4. For a basic yurt that beds five people, Oregon parks presently charge $27-$30 per night; for a luxury yurt that sleeps seven people, the cost is $45-$66 per night.
  5. Traditional sheep herder’s tents were transformed into structures that could be used as a residence, workplace, school, sauna area and gym thanks to the addition of luxury facilities.
  6. If you need extra space, many yurts may be joined together to make a larger area.
  7. Because they are now available practically anywhere in the globe, whether you’re planning a vacation to Costa Rica or Europe, sleeping in a yurt may be an option.
  8. The Sushi Yurt, a nomadic restaurant that specializes in Japanese food, may be seen at various festivals and events around the United Kingdom.
  9. Skiers in Idaho and Utah can lodge in yurts, and those in Park City, Utah, can take a sleigh trip to the Viking Dinner Yurt, which serves a traditional Viking dinner.

What is it about the yurt that has so many people falling in love with it? On the next page, we’ll have a look at some of the causes.

Benefits of Yurt Living

Yurts were advantageous to Mongolian nomads since they were easily transportable. The nomads only required a horse or two to transport their dwellings, and smaller yurts may still easily be transported in a vehicle or a truck for a weekend camping trip with the family. It is very simple to set up and take down, even for those who have no prior expertise. It might take as little as half an hour, while it is more likely to take many hours. You could perform the job on your alone, but having a helping hand or two will make it much more convenient.

For example, in Mongolia, the yurt has shown to be extremely resistant to the elements; rain, snow, wind, and high heat have all been experienced there.

For those who live in colder areas, several of today’s versions are equipped with additional insulation.

The yurt is extremely resilient, even when exposed to the most extreme weather conditions.

One manufacturer offers a 15-year warranty on the canvas, which is far longer than the average shingled roof.

In a yurt, you may listen to the sounds of the rain and the wind while remaining secure and protected from the elements.

Not only does staying in a yurt bring you closer to nature, but the building is also environmentally sustainable.

In addition, the construction is secure.

If you’re sharing a place with wild animals, this will also keep the animals out of your space.

The fact that the structure is not much taller than 6 feet (almost 2 meters) means that it may be put among some tall bushes or trees to provide seclusion.

Building your own yurt is also an option if you have carpentry and sewing abilities; a quick Internet search will turn up hundreds of helpful instructional instructions.

Because the yurt is not a permanent building, it may not be subject to the same taxation as a house if it is erected on a property.

For example, one yurt maker advises his customers not to refer to their structures as “yurts” while dealing with financial institutions because of its unorthodox nature, but rather to highlight that they were created by an architect.

Check with your local planning offices to find out what the regulations are in your region.

Last but not least, there’s no denying that yurts are a lot of fun. One disadvantage of staying in one may be that everyone wants to speak about it with you while you’re not there. See the links on the next page for additional information about yurts and other types of housing.

Lots More Information

  • It was advantageous for Mongolian nomads to have Yurts since they were easily transportable. It only took a couple of horses to transport the nomads’ houses, and smaller yurts may still easily be transported in a vehicle or a truck for a weekend camping excursion. In addition, even someone with no prior knowledge may easily set up and take down the system. The process may be completed in as little as half an hour, however it is more likely to take a few hours or more. The procedure may be completed by yourself, but it is much simpler with the assistance of one or two other individuals. Furthermore, after the structure is up, you can easily transfer it to another plot of land just yards away should you determine that one is a better location. For example, in Mongolia, the yurt has shown to be extremely resilient to the elements
  • Rain, snow, wind, and high heat have all been experienced there. With its modest height and circular form, it is simple to heat, requiring only a fire in the stove and a few additional layers of insulation. For those living in colder climes, several of today’s versions are equipped with additional insulation. The layers may be folded back to allow for the passage of a breeze, and lighter reed mats can be employed to provide seclusion when it is warm. The yurt is extremely resilient, even when exposed to the most extreme conditions. It is possible to make Turkish yurts with pine frameworks that survive for 50 to 70 years. For example, one manufacturer offers a 15-year warranty on canvas roofing, which is far longer than the average shingled roof. When it comes to camping, one of the yurt’s most appealing features is its proximity to nature without being very near to it. The sounds of rain and wind may be enjoyed in a yurt while yet remaining secure and dry. At night, you may hear the sounds of neighboring animals and see the stars, yet you are still provided with appropriate security and comfort. Yurts are not only a great way to get closer to nature
  • They are also environmentally sustainable. In addition, because there is no permanent foundation utilized in the construction of a conventional yurt, moving a yurt has no long-term influence on the land underneath it. In addition, the structure is sturdy. Door locks are available, and even if someone were to pull up the canvas sheeting, it would be difficult to pass through the latticed wood. In addition, if you happen to be sharing space with wild creatures, this will keep them out. Yurts are also rather unobtrusive in their setting. Because the building is not much taller than 6 feet (almost 2 meters), it may be tucked away behind some tall bushes or trees to provide seclusion and protection. The cost of a Yurt, as a structural housing, can be very low, however the additional additions will definitely increase the overall price. Construction of a yurt is also doable with carpentry and sewing abilities
  • A simple Internet search will turn up several instructional instructions on how to do so, though. Taxes are another area in which you may be able to save. In addition, because the yurt is not considered a permanent building, it may not be subject to the same taxation as a home if it is erected on a piece of property. A yurt, on the other hand, may be difficult to finance or obtain financing for because of the nature of the construction. For example, one yurt maker advises his customers not to refer to their structures as “yurts” while dealing with financial institutions due to their unorthodox nature, but rather to highlight that they were built by an architect. Aside from that, placing your yurt according to construction standards may prove to be difficult. You should check with your local planning offices to find out what the restrictions are in your neighborhood. It’s also impossible to dismiss the enjoyment element associated with the use of yurts in the first place. Staying in one may have the disadvantage of attracting the attention of others who want to talk about it with you. See the links on the next page for additional information about yurts and other forms of accommodation.

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