How To Set Up A Cabela’S 6 Man Tent

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Model Geodesic 6-Person Tent

Orders must be placed by 4 p.m. E.T. for the purpose of delivery Size: 10’3″ x 11’10” x 6’1″ Dimensions: 10’3″ x 11’10” x 6’1″ Color: greenish-grayish Select All of Your Alternatives Please see the table above for availability. The Cabela’s® Alaskan Guide Model® Geodesic 6-Person Tent is a time-tested, field-proven classic that is engineered to resist nature’s most harsh circumstances. It provides real 4-season protection. The tent’s state-of-the-art geodesic form, innovative 7-pole system, and durable materials are designed to withstand severe winds that would otherwise destroy weaker tents, providing outdoorsmen with the benefits of 25 years of Alaskan field testing and upgrades.

This full-coverage rainfly also serves as an integrated vestibule, providing you with covered storage space for your belongings as well as protected access into the tent through the D-style door.

The Alaskan Guide Model is available in two sizes.

Smooth-operating No.

  • 10 YKK® zippers are used throughout the tent, ensuring a smooth-operating experience you can rely upon.
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced for strength and extended life.
  • seam sealant, and a repair kit to get you started.
  • Imported.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts will appreciate this ultra-rugged, four-season tent. Built to resist the most harsh circumstances found in nature – and field tested in Alaska – Extreamly stable – modern design and robust frame comprised of seven shock-corded fiberglass poles provide an extremely solid structure. Waterproof rainfly made of durable 75-denier polyester ripstop fabric with a 2,000mm polyurethane covering that keeps out rain and snow
  • Protection for gear storage and entrance is provided by an integrated vestibule. Tent body is made of 210-denier polyester oxford
  • It has three mesh roof vents and two D-style windows for ventilation. Bathtub-style floor made of 210-denier polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated covering
  • Abrasion-resistant carpeting
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced YKK zippers in the numbers 8 and 10 provide a smooth operation throughout. Several panels and compartments for storing equipment
  • It comes with twenty-four metal stakes, sixteen tie downs, two ounces of seam sealant, and a repair kit.

More information may be found here. 100154322 is the web ID for this page.

Cabela’s Instinct Alaskan Guide 6-Person Tent

Orders must be placed by 4 p.m. E.T. for the purpose of delivery Dimensions: 10’10” x 9’5″ Grey is the color of choice. 6-Person Capacity Select All of Your Alternatives Please see the table above for availability. Backcountry hunting gear that can withstand blizzards, strong winds, and pounding rain is required for everything from Dall sheep to high-country mulies. Instinct® Alaskan Guide® 6-Person Tent uses 25 years of field-tested Alaskan Guide technology and improves on it, giving 63 percent more strength, 6 percent less weight, and 36% more useable internal area than the previous model.

  1. It is possible to put up cots along the sidewalls because of the straight-wall design, which increases living space.
  2. A huge vestibule with 86 percent more space than the original Alaskan Guide series is accessed by a D-shaped door, making it ideal for cooking and storing gear during the day.
  3. The use of two ventilation windows allows for on-demand airflow.
  4. This Cabela’s tent has a gear loft and two mesh pockets that allow you to store your items more efficiently than regular big camping tents.

Setup is simplified by the use of six poles. Stakes, man lines with line tensioners, and a carry bag are all included. Liner for the floor (not included). Imported.

  • Heavy rain and snowfall are shrugged aside
  • 75-denier polyester fly with a polyurethane covering of 2,000mm in length
  • 210-denier nylon floor with a polyurethane finish certified for 3,000mm water resistance
  • 7001 aluminum poles were used. The straight-wall design increases the amount of available living space. Extra headroom is provided by the high-rise frame. Make use of hidden pockets for convenient storage
  • The vehicle was tested in a state-of-the-art wind tunnel. Included are stakes, man lines with line tensioners, and a carry bag. Description:

Web ID 100101932.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6-Man Reviews

This tent is a typical design with six sides, is freestanding, and is of the dome style. In terms of weight, the tent weighs 25 pounds and has an internal height of 6 feet 6 inches. Because the footprint is six-sided and approximately ten and a half feet in diameter, a big location must be found in order to accommodate the tent’s footprint. This is not a lightweight trekking tent that sacrifices durability for the sake of weight savings. Base camp tent has a tough, heavy duty, and high weight construction.

  1. There are three enormous zipper-closing roof vents as well as three large windows, one of which is in the entryway and the other two on the other side of the room.
  2. Strangely enough, the mosquito netting on the two windows that aren’t doors zips up.
  3. Opening up the mosquito netting makes it feasible to reach out and close the window flaps from within the tent if it begins to rain and the tent is closed.
  4. It would be considerably more difficult to set up in the wind or rain.
  5. The poles are made of aluminum that has been shock corded and is incredibly long.
  6. A seventh pole that is shorter than the others fits into the fly and makes a covered arch above the entryway.
  7. In addition to the entrance, each of the other two side poles has an arch over a window on the opposing side of the building.

All six poles come to a stop at ground level, in the opposite direction of where they began.

The short length of the pole sleeves is the source of the difficulty in erecting the tent.

The sleeves and fabric holders for the clips are color coded, which is useful once the initial clips have been appropriately attached to the fabric holders and sleeves.

The most difficult element is getting the poles into the right sleeves and using the correct ring and pin fittings.

It’s possible that Cabela’s will extend the sleeves in future designs.

Then, with the three poles that arch to the side in place, you’re finished.

Check to see that all of the clips are securely fastened to the poles.

A pole is threaded through a sleeve in the fly and is used to create a hoop over the entryway.

One of the roof vents is positioned under the hood that covers the entrance, and this vent is particularly effective.

Oddly enough, there are two hooks at each of the fly’s six ground points, which makes sense.

It should be noted that each hook exerts stress on a fly seam that corresponds to a tent pole in the tent.

They have a tendency to get caught in the poles and cloth, making it difficult to set up smoothly.

Once it has been assembled, it may be lifted up and moved a short distance if necessary.

There are a dozen massive steel tent stakes included in the package.

Inside, there is a detachable mesh drying loft, as well as a dozen compartments sewed into and along the sides of the walls, as well as can holders in the corners.

In comparison to building the tent, striking the tent is far quicker and faster since there is no work put into positioning the poles appropriately.

Remove all of the clips from all of the poles, and then remove the poles themselves from the scaffolding.

Tent from a bygone era Three years ago, I acquired a tent that was very identical to this one.

I returned the tent to Cabela’s, and they swapped it for a new one with a reasonable adjustment ($90) for the three years of use that the previous tent had accumulated.

The zippers, while not enormous, are more than suitable for their intended purpose, and there are three roof vents rather than one.

The three vents on the new model are situated lower in the chassis, where they will provide improved ventilation.

The inclusion of the can holders and revised compartments is a welcome improvement.

In the FieldLike the majority of six-man tents, this one can fit four adult males, or in my family’s case, two adults and three children, depending on the size of the tent.

In fifteen to twenty minutes, two adults can have the tent, fly, and all guy-outs up and running.

In preparation for a night of thirty-three degrees rain, we staked the fly out to provide for maximum clearance between the sidewalls and the fly on our most recent trip.

Although there was no rain that night, the water vapor emitted by five persons in those conditions resulted in the expected condensation on the fly around the tent’s peak.

Previous rain experience demonstrated that the door could be zipped half-way open and yet be protected by the fly that arches over the opening.

It also has a tendency to snag while closing the door with the zipper.

At first, I felt all of the pockets and tie points on the interior of the tent were unnecessary extras.

The greater the number of people and the greater the amount of clutter in the tent, the more difficult it is to find items.

The pockets are a big assistance.

When there are a lot of youngsters in the tent, having three entrances and exits is really convenient.

I wish I could claim that the kids are respectful of the tent and that it is a happy place for them.

In addition to being spacious and airy, the tent is also rather dark, giving the impression that you are “within.” This tent provides a sense of security for the children.

That will never be seen by anybody in my tent.

In those situations, the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide tent, which sleeps six people, comes highly recommended. Freestanding dome is the design. Sleeps a total of 6 or more people. Setup was a little difficult at first. 25 pounds is the maximum weight. Paid in full: $450

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Reviews – Trailspace

Review of the Alaskan Guide (Cabelas) 4-man TentI acquired this four-person tent for a number of important reasons. Primary considerations were that it be a robust tent that could endure moderately high wind gusts, rain, and snow while remaining durable over time, and that it be constructed as a four-season tent while being readily transportable. I like the 6 man model because of the increased room it provides; nevertheless, the four guy form is perfect for canoe camping and other similar activities.

  • With its outstanding six-pole construction (I highly recommend the aluminum upgrade), the Tent is extremely robust, and it is capable of supporting 1 litre water bottles in each of the four holders without drooping or straining the tent structure.
  • The ceiling height is well than acceptable for a tent of this size; despite my 6’6″ height, I never once bumped my head on the LED bulb in the gear loft when using the tent “This is something I’m picky about.
  • The stake straps are quite effective, but setting up this tent is not a one-person job since you will need an additional person to hold the first pole over the anchor pin and offer some support so that the pole does not over bend and fail.
  • The tub floor has been thoughtfully designed, and the materials used are of high quality.
  • To give you an idea of how big it is, it’s about the same size as a bikini bottom.
  • There is room for improvement.
  • While these stakes are superior than most, you may give them to your cousin and replace them with a pair of 12 inch steel spikes.
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Steel spikes are the most common form of spike for every sort of ground; you can’t go wrong with them, but they are heavier.

I’ll be looking about for a more suitable alternative.

The Fly is a kind of insect.

For starters, the fly is far too short for a four-season tent of this kind.

Furthermore, you may open both doors in warm weather to let in some fresh air, and you can always open the well-designed three-section vestibule for additional ventilation when needed.

The distance between the ground and the tent is approximately 8 feet “as well as possibly a little more in the vestibule area A significant amount of snow would be required to lessen the drafts, and you would be unable to keep anything on the inside margins of the vestibule without it being wet in rainy circumstances as a result of this.

Although it is ridiculously small (on the tested four-person model) and almost unusable for any day-to-day activity other than a small amount of storage, it would be fantastically effective if it were extended out another two feet or so and included the adjustable awning poles I previously mentioned.

  1. The fly is equipped with two brass hooks on shock cording at each anchor point, and these will certainly drive you insane if you don’t pay attention.
  2. When you fling the fly over the tent and attempt to arrange it, they latch onto every pole, loop, and possible protrusion, making this process a pain and requiring you to circle your tent incessantly just to get the fly in place, which is time-consuming and frustrating.
  3. This is simply plain stupid, to be honest.
  4. I pulled the eyelets from the fly and reinstalled them on the rings attached to the thick gauge nylon floor straps that I had used for staking out the tent after opening the eyelets.
  5. In addition, you’ll want to secure the velcro loops sewed on the bottom of the fly (which are used to wrap around the tent poles during storms) because they like to catch on things.
  6. Vent Windows are always open to provide for proper ventilation.
  7. Any amount of wind appears to be able to simply pass through the fly and through these vent ports.

Please excuse me, but I was under the impression that this was a four-season tent.

I didn’t have much spare time between trips, and I didn’t want to get myself into a sewing bee, so I skipped it.

Nighttime temps were just above freezing during a recent overnight test, and presto!

Despite the cold, my heater was able to keep the tent nice and warm.

Problem solved, and I can easily remove any of the covers if necessary without exerting too much effort.

ConclusionI am shocked that this tent has been around for a number of years and yet it has so many severe and easily solved design defects, especially considering how inexpensive it is.

The fly, on the other hand, is something you’ll have to put up with until a redesign is finalized and implemented.

I’d even be prepared to pay for mine if it were that much required.

If given the opportunity, I would be delighted to write another review that incorporated some of these adjustments. I am confident that the outcome would be a 5 Star rating without a doubt. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6-person Tent Review

In recent testing, the Gear Guys discovered the Alaskan Guide series tent from Cabela’s and were really pleased with the quality and performance of the product. We put the tent through its paces after getting three days of rain, followed by a fast freeze that resulted in two inches of snow and a temperature of 18 degrees throughout the testing period. The space around the door vent and roof vent is seen in the front image. “data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” data-small-file=” src=” alt=”” width=”609″ height=”341″ srcset=” h=341 607w, h=682 1214w, h=84 150w, h=169 300w, h=575 1024w” sizes=”(max-width: 609px) 100vw, 609px” alt=”” width=”609″ height=”341″ “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized The door vent and roof vent area are visible in the front perspective.

  • Use in all four seasons
  • D-frame construction for strength
  • Integrated vestibule that shields the entry and serves as a storage area for gear
  • Poles made of fiberglass with shock cords
  • Polyethylene floor with corner clips for an optional clip-in place floor liner
  • Abrasion-resistant polyester floor
  • Fly made of polyester ripstop (waterproof rating of 2000 mm thick)
  • Floor having a waterproof rating of 3000 mm in thickness
  • YKK zippers are used. Floor dimensions: 10’8″ x 11’9″ Height: 6’3″
  • Weight: 32 pounds
  • Center height: 6’3″

As a result of acquiring and testing the KeltyDiscovery 4 Tent and discovering that the tent had a significant moisture problem when temperatures dropped below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, we began looking for a winter-specific tent to use on winter trips. We discovered the Alaskan Guide 6-person tent set-up for exhibition at Cabela’s and were immediately pleased by the center height and integrated vestibule, which allows us to store goods outside the tent while also keeping it clean and dry while also keeping it clean and dry.

  • As a result of reviewing customer evaluations, one of the most common complaints about this tent was the amount of time and effort it took to set it up by yourself.
  • If you purchase this tent, however, the likelihood are that you will have at least one other person with you when you put it up, and while build-up is fairly efficient with two people, it is still time-consuming.
  • When bending and elevating the fiberglass poles to reach the mounting pins, it is important not to put too much strain on the fiberglass poles.
  • This allows the other person to rapidly move around the tent and secure the pole ends into the mounting pins while the first person is still working.
  • The robustness of this tent, as well as its capacity to withstand severe winds and snow loads, have been praised in other online customer evaluations.
  • The Gear Guys spend a lot of time camping in cold weather, and waking up to damp gear in the morning from a poorly ventilated tent is really inconvenient.
  • Despite the fact that we have not had an opportunity to test the tent in severe rain, many of the reviews from those who have done so have said that the tent keeps water out even in the most intense storms.
  • The disadvantage of this tent is that it requires a significant amount of effort to set up, but if your journey will last many days, it will be well worth the effort.

src=” alt=””> Morning view of a rain-fly that effectively kept freezing rain and snow out while venting moisture” data medium file=” data large file=” src=” alt=””> Morning view of a rain-fly that effectively kept freezing rain and snow out while venting moisture” data large file=” data medium file=” src=” alt=””> Side view displaying the second door zipper at the left rear” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” src=” alt=””> Side view showing the second door zipper at the left rear” data-large-file=” src=” alt=””> Side view showing the second door zipper at the left rear Elastic cable with hooks for the rain fly and adjustable webbing for optimal pole tension are both included.

There is adjustable webbing for the correct tension of the poles, as well as an elastic cord with hooks for the rain fly.

This tent has a rating of 4 stars from us (out of 5).

How to pitch the Cabela eight-person tent – Mary Donahue

There are instructions for erecting Cabela eight-person tarp tents printed on the tent bag, as well as instructions for pitching tents from a variety of other brands, manufactures, and models. However, they only give line drawings, so we thought additional illustrations could be beneficial. Although the tent’s instructions state that it must be pitched by a minimum of two people, four or even six individuals make the job considerably simpler. The rain fly is attached to one of the shorter poles.

  • Begin by extending the folded-up poles and bringing them closer together.
  • Following that, three of the long poles are inserted into the three mesh pole sleeves at the top of the tent, forming a triangle shape as follows: Make sure the first three poles are tucked into their sleeves.
  • The color of the pole sleeves is harmonized on the majority of them.
  • (On some of the tents, we used a different color permanent ink marker to indicate where each pole should be placed.) and then into the ring pins of their shoes All of the poles are inserted into ringpins at the bottom corners, and they are clipped onto the tent.
  • Neither of the other three long poles is threaded through any of the sleeves.
  • Finally, when all six long poles have been secured in place with clips along their lengths and in their ring pins at their ends, locate the clips or velcro that wrap around at pole intersections and wrap two poles together with each of them to complete the installation.
  • After all six poles have been correctly inserted, the tent should look like this: After that, you’ll thread the small pole through a sleeve on the rainfly and drape the rainfly over the tent while looking for the ring pins for the long pole.
  • There are lines that may be pulled outside to tent pegs or even to a tree to secure the tent.

This page contains information about the following topics:- This section contains examples of nice tents, but it also contains examples of blunders made when using or pitching them, which you may wish to skip: In the event you pitch your tent by yourself after midnight, you may find that you have put the rain fly and poles on the tent upside down when you wake up the next morning: He realized that he had not entirely dried out his tent the previous time he had used it, resulting in mold growing in it.

Instead, he and a companion were able to sleep peacefully in the Chevy Suburban: This page contains information about the following topics:- During the winter trip in 2017, these individuals erected their tent inappropriately.

  • If they obtained it from a third party, did they seek guidance on how to pitch it to the audience?
  • It appeared to the other campers, who were watching from a distance, that everything was OK with them.
  • They were arrested and charged with felony assault and criminal mischief after being discovered trying to sleep in their car in the morning.
  • As a result, there was insufficient tension in the tent fabric to allow it to fully burst out into shape.
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Like you can see in the picture above, all decent tents will have pockets or ring pins for the ends of poles to be inserted into, as in the following example from this website: This page contains information about the following topics:- Furthermore, a poorly designed tent with a rain fly that is not pitched taut and does not extend all the way down the outside, allowing rain and melting snow to drip down onto the tent fabric and soak in, along with the classic mistake of having a tarp under the tent that sticks out the sides, has resulted in a soaking situation.

  1. The rain that drips off the rain fly pools on the tarp, where it soaks into the tent’s bottom fabric and soaks into the tent’s floor.
  2. Would you put an 8-foot-diameter tent in a puddle with an 8-foot-diameter diameter?
  3. • • • • • • • • • • • • • This many campers may be accommodated in an eight-person tent just for fun.
  4. When we got the photo below of too many people sleeping in an eight person tent, we removed the rainfly to allow for more light to enter the tent.

For information on the mechanics of where to pitch your tent and how to be warm and comfortable when camping in a tent in the snow, see First-advice timer’s for tent camping in the snow. Do not purchase a low-cost tent.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Model Geodesic 4-Person Tent

Orders must be placed by 4 p.m. E.T. for the purpose of delivery Size: 9’5″L x 8’W x 4’8″HColor: Green/Gray Dimensions: 9’5″L x 8’W x 4’8″HColor: Green/Gray 4-Person Capacity Select All of Your Alternatives Please see the table above for availability. Incredibly durable and engineered to resist nature’s most extreme circumstances, the Cabela’s® Alaskan Guide Model® Geodesic 4-Person Tent provides full four-season protection in a time-tested and field-proven classic design. The tent’s state-of-the-art geodesic form, innovative 7-pole system, and durable materials are designed to withstand severe winds that would otherwise destroy weaker tents, providing outdoorsmen with the benefits of 25 years of Alaskan field testing and upgrades.

  1. This full-coverage rainfly also serves as an integrated vestibule, providing you with covered storage space for your belongings as well as protected access into the tent through the D-style door.
  2. The Alaskan Guide Model is available in two sizes.
  3. Smooth-operating No.
  4. 10 YKK® zippers are used throughout the tent, ensuring a smooth-operating experience you can rely upon.
  5. Guy line loops that have been reinforced for strength and extended life.
  6. seam sealant, and a repair kit to get you started.
  7. Weight to be transported: 24 lbs.
  8. Imported.
  • Outdoor enthusiasts will appreciate this ultra-rugged, four-season tent. Built to resist the most harsh circumstances found in nature – and field tested in Alaska – Extreamly stable – modern design and robust frame comprised of seven shock-corded fiberglass poles provide an extremely solid structure. The rainfly is made of durable 75-denier polyester ripstop with a 2,000mm polyurethane waterproof covering that keeps out rain and snow. Protection for gear storage and entrance is provided by an integrated vestibule. Tent body is made of 210-denier polyester oxford
  • It has three mesh roof vents and two D-style windows for ventilation. Bathtub-style floor made of 210-denier polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated covering
  • Abrasion-resistant carpeting
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced YKK zippers in the numbers 8 and 10 provide a smooth operation throughout. Several panels and compartments for storing equipment
  • It comes with twenty-four metal stakes, sixteen tie downs, two ounces of seam sealant, and a repair kit.

Web ID 100102896.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent Review –

Anyone who has gone on a weekend vacation or a longer out-of-state journey understands how important it is to have a high-quality tent with them. Despite the fact that an RV is desirable, they are not always feasible. Having a high-quality tent is essential for staying dry, warm, and comfortable when camping. The last thing you want is to be unpleasant or have to cut short a trip due to a tent breakdown. However, this is exactly what might happen.

Having purchased and used several tents over the years, this post is an honest assessment of the Cabela’s 6-Person Alaskan Guide Tent, which I have owned for two years and have thoroughly enjoyed. The 6-Person Alaskan Guide Tent from Cabela’s has the following specifications:

Height 6’ 3”
Length 10’ 8”
Width 10’ 8”
Packed Size 31” x 9” x 10.6”
Weight 33 pounds

Overview of the Product

  • Built to endure nature’s most harsh circumstances — field tested in Alaska – this ultra-rugged 4-season garment is perfect for any occasion. Made of seven shock-corded fiberglass poles, this structure is extremely stable, has cutting-edge design, and is extremely sturdy. This durable, 75D polyester ripstop rainfly is protected from rain and snow with a 2,000mm PU waterproof covering. Integrated vestibule for storing and entering items in a safe environment
  • 210D polyester oxford tent body with three mesh roof vents and two D-style windows for ventilation
  • Lightweight and durable. Bathtub-style floor made of 210D polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated coating
  • Abrasion-resistant floor made of 210D polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated coating
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced YKK® zippers in the numbers 8 and 10 provide a smooth operation throughout. Several panels and compartments for storing equipment
  • It comes with twenty-four metal stakes, sixteen tie downs, two ounces of seam sealant, and a repair kit.

Experiment in the Field Since purchasing the Cabela’s 6-Person Alaskan Guide Tent for myself two years ago, I’ve used it on countless camping excursions as well as two week-long deer hunts in Southern Illinois on public lands in November. The following are some of my key takeaways: Durability– The first thing I noticed about this tent was the thickness and durability of the walls, ceiling, and rainfly, which I thought was a great feature. When the tent is put up, you can see it is made of high-quality materials.

  • In addition, the floor has been strengthened with extra material to increase its longevity and thicken it.
  • This liner connects to loops in each corner of the tent, making it simple to put up, take down, and clean the tent.
  • There is a bundle of long heavy-duty pegs included with the Alaskan Guide tent to ensure that the tent does not move while in use.
  • This helps it stand out from the crowd.
  • When compared to a standard square or rectangular tent, the geodesic design provides significantly more inside space, providing for plenty of area for cots (such as Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Cot), a big air mattress, clothes, and other supplies.
  • The vestibule space at the entrance of the Alaskan Guide tent is another feature that makes it a worthwhile investment.
  • The boot rack is a fantastic place to store boots and other belongings, which frees up more space within the house.

I chose the 6-person model over the 4-person model because the middle height allows me to stand up more comfortably than the 4-person model, and the 8-person model appeared to be a little too large for my needs.

For ventilation, the Alaskan Guide tent features a few small built-in mesh vents in the ceiling, which is unlike other budget tents, which have mesh walls beneath the rain cover to save money.

Heater Portable Buddy Heat in this tent throughout the night in frigid weather and it has remained nice and toasty inside while still being able to properly vent out the roof.

This tent also stands up well in the wind, with the walls rarely moving even when the tent is entirely staked down.

The rain flap opens on both sides with a zipper, and the internal windows may be pulled down to allow for increased circulation and to chill the interior if necessary.

In comparison to previous tents I’ve used, this one keeps me entirely dry all of the time.

When it rains lightly to moderately, water droplets condense on the rain fly and flow down it.

When I put up my tent, I place a heavy-duty tarp below it to provide additional moisture protection.

One of the primary factors in my decision to acquire this tent was the ability to keep dry when camping.

In the evenings, I put a tiny light up there to illuminate the entire tent space.

For additional storage and organizing possibilities, the tent comes with one huge removable storage compartment that can be placed on the wall for enhanced convenience.

This is due to the fact that there are more poles, straps, and stakes to erect than with a standard camping tent.

I would much rather spend the few extra minutes it takes to set up a high-quality tent than to save a few dollars.

Certainly, it was more expensive than I had anticipated spending on a tent at the time, but I’ve been absolutely delighted with my decision to purchase it.

This tent has been in pristine condition for the past two years, and there are no indications of wear or tear on its outside.

This tent comes highly recommended by me for any hunter or serious outdoorsman searching for a high-quality product, as you can see from the review above. Check out some of the other entries from Bowhunting Depot for relevant information!

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6 Person Geodesic Tent

When traveling in my Rubicon, I’m looking for a tent to utilize as an additional sleeping space. The interior height and features of the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6 Person Geodesic Tent appeal to me, but I’ve read a couple of reviews that indicate that it is difficult to impossible to set up by one person. I intend to sleep on cots in order to save money. I had been considering The North Face Mountain 25 tent, but it would not enable me to stand up comfortably, and I would most likely wind up sleeping on a mattress in that situation.

  • Is there anyone who has had any experience in this area that they would be willing to share?
  • The only difference is that the door is on the long side, which is more to my liking than the short side.
  • It’s a fantastic option for a bombproof 2-person bunker, and I strongly suggest it.
  • I was able to get a Halo 6 for less than $425.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent 4-Person Review

This is a comprehensive evaluation of the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 4-Person Tent, which you can read here. This isn’t your typical tent review, so bear with me. We’ve been putting this bad boy through the ringer for for a decade and counting, in rain, snow, and wind alike. Because the tent’s design has stayed essentially same throughout the years (with the exception of minor aesthetic modifications), you can be confident that our evaluation is still relevant for new models today. So, what are our thoughts?

Even though it is fairly pricey, it should survive for at least ten years (if not two).

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Initial Thoughts

When I went to Father Hennepin State Park in 2013, I wrote down my first impressions of the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 4-Person Tent, which you can read here. You’ll notice that when you first pull the tent out of the bag, everything is a bit disorganized, with poles, stakes, and tarps all over the place. Putting this tent up for the first time might be a bit intimidating (ours didn’t even come with any assembly instructions!). Fortunately for you, I’ve put up a helpful video setup tutorial (as well as extensive written instructions, which you can see below).

When we’ve gone RV camping in the past, we’ve mostly utilized the tent for our children and their friends.

It has kept my family warm and dry in all types of weather. I would absolutely purchase this tent for my family again in the future. But I’m convinced that my present Alaskan Guide Tent will survive for another ten years at the very least.

Long-Term Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 4 Review

We’ve been using this 4-season tent for over a decade and are still happy with its performance. Here’s what we’ve found to be the most satisfying:

Durability

What astonished us the most was how long it lasted. However, it’s possible that the Alaskan Guide Tent’s long-term endurance shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. Cabela’s is well-known for the exceptional quality of all of their camping equipment. Furthermore, this tent has been continuously developed over the course of more than 25 years of field testing to become the beast that it is today. Our tent has seen better days, yet it continues to operate as well as it did when we first bought it.

4-Season Weatherproofing

The Alaskan Guide series tent is popular because of its ability to be used in all four seasons. No, we haven’t actually used our tent in Alaska, but my family has put it through its paces in all kinds of weather, including the wind, snow, and rain that Minnesotans experience throughout the winter months. The fabric is completely waterproof, and the floors are made of 3000mm thick abrasion-resistant oxford nylon material (to prevent tears and keep moisture out), while the rain cover is made of 2000mm thick material to keep out the elements.

And that’s not even taking into consideration the sturdy frame, heavy-duty rainfly fabric, and geodesic form, which provides better protection against stronger winds than the majority of other tents.

Convenient Features

The vestibule of the tent is one of the most useful characteristics of this model. It’s a perfect spot to keep soiled hiking boots, camp shoes, and other camping equipment out of the way. This saves space while also keeping the interior of the tent clean and dry. Because the vestibule is totally waterproof, you won’t have to be concerned about your belongings becoming wet while traveling. The interior of the tent is lined with several gear compartments that run around the outside. Despite the fact that such amenities are now typical on tents, the Alaskan Guide’s profusion of pockets is a significant benefit.

A Few Drawbacks

The Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent 4-Person is a substantial piece of equipment. Canoeing in the Boundary Waters is a favorite activity for our family, but this tent is a little too hefty for such excursions. The MSR Hubba Hubba NX2 is an excellent choice for canoeing and camping adventures since it is lightweight and compact. According to the information provided above, this tent is likewise tough to erect, at least the first couple of times. However, even though I’ve mastered the procedure (which I discuss in detail below), it is still a bit of a nuisance for one person to do it all by themselves.

As is true of most 4-person tents, there isn’t enough space for four persons (particularly with all of their stuff) in this one.

Yes, two adults and two children are OK. Yes, four (or more) children are OK. However, the maximum number of adults who can sleep comfortably is three. It’s not a good idea unless you’re all really comfortable with one another.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent Pros and Cons

There are pros and downsides to this Cabela’s 4-person tent, just as there are to any camping equipment (and especially tents). After more than seven years of continuous use, we have a strong understanding of the advantages and disadvantages.

Pros:

It’s a long-lasting product. Because, as I’ve stated several times before, this baby will last a lifetime with good care and storage practices. In addition to the rock-solid structure, the tent’s bottom is extremely thick and abrasion-resistant, and even the rainfly is composed of 75D ripstop fabric for further durability. It is impervious to water. There is no way for rain to get inside this tent. The same may be said about snow. No matter how hard the wind blows or how heavy the rain falls, the full-coverage rainfly and 3000mm-rated covered tent floor keep wetness to a minimum.

  1. The Alaskan Guide tent’s seven shock-corded fiberglass poles and state-of-the-art geodesic dome shape provide excellent wind protection (I’ve read accounts from owners who claim to have hunkered down in the tent during gusts of more than 65mph).
  2. Keep your boots outside and the interior of your vehicle clean.
  3. Vestibule is a portion of the waterproof rainfly that provides covering all the way down to the ground to keep anything within of it dry.
  4. I understand that buying a tent isn’t about appearances.
  5. In addition, the Alaskan Guide is, in my opinion, really well-designed.

Cons:

It’s a big piece of equipment. The latest (2021) model of the 4-person Guide Tent weighs 24 pounds 11 ounces, which is a significant reduction from the previous model. It’s a pain to get everything set up. At first, it’s difficult to set up this tent! It’s lot simpler to do with a partner, though I’ve become good at doing it in under 15 minutes on my own as well. It is too pricey. If you’re seeking for a winter tent on a tight budget, there are far better solutions available. To counteract this, the Alaskan Guide’s durability ensures that the tent will survive for an extremely long period before it has to be replaced.

Best Uses for the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent

The Cabela’s Four-Person Alaskan Guide Tent is designed to withstand tough climates and heavy use in the wilderness. Hunting, fishing, and other outdoor activities are popular uses for it, and it is especially popular when severe weather is forecast. It’s the perfect tent for camping in all four seasons. It continues to work admirably after over ten years in all situations, including Minnesota winters, according to the manufacturer. When I’m hunkered down in this Cabela’s 4-person tent, I never have to be concerned about it collapsing since the pole structure is really robust and durable.

Because of the mesh windows, walls, and vents in the tent body, it is extremely breathable. In reality, my family has mostly utilized this Cabela’s Guide Tent for family camping in state parks and private campgrounds when the weather has been pleasant, rather than for winter camping in bad weather.

Who Do I Think the Alaskan Guide Tent Is Best for?

This isn’t an ultralight or even a lightweight tent, so don’t expect that. It’s big and heavy, and it’s not the most straightforward thing in the world to put together. However, it is built to last. This is how your grandfather used to construct tents when he went camping with his family. There’s nothing fancy about it; simply tough materials that will last a lifetime and keep you dry. My experience with camping tents has been extensive (see my previous camping tent reviews), and this is one of the top choices for the BIFL (buy it for life) community.

How to Set Up the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent 4-Person Model

When setting up the Alaskan Guide Tent, it is easier to do it with two people, however as you can see in my video above, it is feasible to do so with one person (takes me about 15 minutes). Tent should be spread widely. Open the tent body on the ground, with the top facing up and the door pointing in the direction you want it to go. Stakes are a pound. Install the anchors at a 45-degree angle away from the tent to ensure a secure fit. I prefer to start with all of the stakes high up in the air.

Tent poles should be assembled.

The smaller of the two poles is for the vestibule, while the rest of the poles are for the tent body.

Pushing the poles through the sleeves of the tent will help to place them on the ground.

Insert the pole ends into the holders.

Do both sides of a pole at the same time before going on to the next.

After the first one or two poles have been set in their end holders, the tent will begin to take shape and stand erect on its own.

Following the installation of all of the tent’s poles and the setting up of the tent, you’ll most likely need to tweak a few of the stakes in order for the tent to grow to its maximum size.

Do you expect rain or snow?

It should be inserted through a sleeve towards the rear of the vestibule.

Attach the shockcorded hooks on the rainfly to the holders on the sides of the tent using the shockcorded hooks on the tent.

Attach stakes to the front and back corners of the vestibule to hold it in place.

The Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Geodesic Tent may be put up in exactly this manner.

Larger Models Are Available

The Alaskan Guide Tent model for four people is the subject of my review. Cabela’s presently sells it in two different sizes: a 6-person model and an 8-person model, both of which I have not personally utilized. Following the specifications and user evaluations for these, it appears that both bigger variants are constructed using the same design and materials as the 4-person model, with the exception of having somewhat greater internal room (remember this adds slightly more weight).

When it comes to the Alaskan Guide Tent, if you like the way it looks but need something a little larger than the 4-person model I reviewed today, I am confident that my experience will translate well to the 6-person and 8-person models as well.

Is the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide the Right Tent for You?

My Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 4-Person Tent is still one of my favorite camping accessories. It’s still going strong after more than a decade of use, and I’m optimistic that we’ll be using it in another decade. If you’re searching for a “lightish” winter tent or a family tent that appears to be bulletproof, I believe this is the tent for you. Camping is a blast!

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