How To Scotchgard A Tent

Scotchgard™ How to use Scotchgard™ Heavy Duty Water Shield

  • Is ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield suitable for use on what types of surfaces? The fabric patio furniture, sporting equipment, boat coverings, backpacks, tents, outerwear and leather may all benefit from the use of ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield. How long does it take for ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield to dry completely? It is expected that your cloth will dry overnight at approximately typical room temperature (70 degrees Fahrenheit, 50 percent relative humidity), but verify before you begin using treated surfaces again. The drying time for your surfaces may be prolonged when the weather is cooler or more humid. Making the space more ventilated by opening windows, using a fan, or putting the product outside will assist in drying ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield more quickly. If you’re only drying between applications, 2 – 4 hours is generally sufficient
  • Otherwise, longer is recommended. What types of materials may be treated with ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield? ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield may be used on a variety of fabrics, including cotton, cotton blends, leather, suede, nylon, canvas, and polyester. If in doubt, test a tiny, inconspicuous area first to ensure that your cloth will maintain its colorfastness after washing. In the event that you apply ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield to treat outdoor gear with white rubber soles, the soles may go yellow
  • If this occurs, wipe the affected area with rubbing alcohol as soon as possible. What is the recommended frequency of reapplication of ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield? Reapply ScotchgardTM Heavy Duty Water Shield on a seasonal or as-needed basis to keep the repellent properties.

Tent Waterproofing: Top Tips on How to Waterproof a Tent

It may seem bizarre to have to waterproof tents since one of its primary functions is to keep the rain out, but tent waterproofing is a necessary evil. Even the highest-quality camping tents, however, can degrade with time and lose their ability to protect the user from the elements. In order to give your wilderness home a little TLC, you’ll need to know what you’re doing and how to waterproof a tent when the occasion arises.

Why do you need to waterproof a tent

The majority of half decent tents are waterproof when you purchase them; nevertheless, there are some low-grade tents on the market that simply pretend to be water-resistant when purchased. These tents are not waterproof in any way, and they will begin to melt as soon as there is even a slight suggestion of moisture in the air. Not nearly, to be honest. However, when the wind picks up and the rain starts pouring, they will almost likely be insufficient protection. In this case, applying a tent waterproofing treatment will not make the tent impermeable, but it will increase its water resistance.

Sun damage

Just as dangerous ultraviolet (UV) rays may cause irreparable damage to human skin, so too can continuous exposure to the sun cause irreversible damage to textiles and other materials. Even a couple of weeks of camping in the hot summer heat may do severe damage to your tent’s fly sheet, limiting its ability to withstand heavy rain and other elements. One of the most effective strategies to extend the life of your tent is to keep it out of the sun as much as possible. If you want to camp in sunny areas, continue reading to learn how to do it safely.

Use and age

It is inevitable that fabric that is continuously beaten by the weather, that is coated in filth and dust, that is left to dry out in the sun, and that is then folded up in a bag and left for months, will degrade. As a result of the weather and dirt, water gets absorbed into the fabric, making it less efficient against rain and wind protection. Tent waterproofing treatments, such as DWR coatings, assist to extend the life of tent fabrics by covering the surface of the fabric with a water-repellent coating.

Damaged seams

The strength of the tent seams will be compromised as a result of time and exposure to the environment. When you purchase a tent, the majority of them will have fully sealed seams. However, seals can become compromised with time, resulting in leaks at the seams. This issue can be resolved by using a seam sealer.

Identify the problem

Consider this: before you spend a lot of money treating the entire tent and all of its seams with pricey tent waterproofing treatments, figure out which section of your tent is not performing properly. Examine your tent during the next downpour, or put it up in your backyard and spray it down with water to check for the following things: Have you ensured that it is correctly installed? Tents that are improperly set up will not perform as well as they should. Take care to ensure that all of the guylines are properly staked out.

  1. In order to maintain a proper separation between the inner and outer fly, make sure the outer fly is staked out well.
  2. Is there any evidence of water leaking through the seams?
  3. If there is water dripping through the seams, you will need to reseal them using a seam sealer to prevent further water damage.
  4. It is necessary to pitch your tent on damp ground and then sit in your tent for a period of time in order to thoroughly test this.

Is there any evidence of water leaking through the main fabric of the tent fly? This is most often caused by use, age, and/or UV damage, and necessitates the use of a waterproof tent spray to remedy the situation. The tent appears to be missing a tarp.

How to waterproof a tent

Some individuals waterproof their tent after every few uses, while others do it on a more regular basis. Others may only do tent waterproofing once over the lifetime of their tents! Your tent’s waterproofing frequency is determined by the amount of time you spend in it, how well you care for it, and under what conditions you use it. We recommend that you do this at least once a year, at the start of the camping season.

01 Clean your tent

It is necessary to thoroughly clean your tent before using a tent waterproofing solution, seam sealer, or tent repair tape.

  • Set up your tent as soon as possible. Toss some mild detergent or a tech wash into a pail of warm water and set it aside. Clean it with a gentle sponge until it is completely clean, giving special care to the seams. Before drying the tent, spray it with a tent waterproofing agent.

TOP SUGGESTION: Do not wash your tent in the washing machine!

02 Apply a tent waterproofing treatment

  • Set up your tent as soon as possible. Make certain that the tent is clean and moist
  • Using a spray, brush, or sponge, apply the treatment to the tent fly from top to bottom. Any surplus product should be cleaned up with a wet towel. Allow it to dry completely before putting it away.

03 Seal the seams

  • Make sure your tent is clean and dry before you begin. Lay the tent out on a clean, level surface with the inside of the seams facing up
  • This will ensure that the tent stays dry. Apply a tiny amount of rubbing alcohol on a dry towel and wipe the seam to remove any remaining stains from the fabric
  • Remove any portions that are flaking away with care. Apply the seam sealer using a tiny brush in accordance with the manufacturer’s directions. Allow it to dry completely before putting it away.

The best waterproof tent sprays

Tent waterproofing solutions are available in a variety of various formulations. Some people choose to wash their tents in addition to treating them with waterproofing. Others include ultraviolet (UV) protection. Here are a few of the greatest alternatives:

Nikwax Tent and Gear Solarproof

  • One of the most effective techniques of tent waterproofing is really a preventive measure. As a result of the Solarproof treatment, the fabric is strengthened and protected against UV damage, in addition to providing water repellency and strengthening the fabric. Use of your tent should be preceded by the application of this product.

Kiwi Camp Dry Heavy Duty Water Repellent

  • In contrast to the Nikwax products, this Kiwi Camp treatment has a high concentration of chemicals. It is recommended to apply two applications for the optimum effects, and it may be used on objects other than tents.

Nikwax Tech Wash

  • Nikwax Tech Wash is generally used as a washing treatment for technical textiles, but it also has the added benefit of revitalizing breathability and water repellency. It is a good idea to include some waterproofing as a preventative measure

Star Brite Waterproofing Spray, Stain Repellent + UV Protection

  • In the same way as Nikwax Solarwash protects your tent before you use it, this product protects your tent before you use it. However, it should only be used after the tent is completely dry, and it may be used on a variety of various goods.

Scotchgard Outdoor Water Shield

  • Waterproof tent spray that is simple to apply and can be applied in a single application
  • It may also be used to provide water repellency to other items of outdoor gear.

Canvas waterproofing

Cotton canvas is used to construct some of the most comfortable and long-lasting tents for camping and glamping. Bell tents and teepee tents, for example, function exceptionally well in inclement weather. This high level of performance may be attributed to both the structural design and the durability of the canvas fabric. Camping enthusiasts have relied on cotton canvas for generations because of the inherent qualities of the fibers to make a highly waterproof fabric that has proven to be durable and long-lasting.

This is not due to the fact that they are defective, but rather due to the fact that the waterproofness of cotton canvas actually increases when it is wet.

Preventing your tent from becoming wet first can save you money on a time-consuming and expensive canvas waterproofing treatment.

It will become more waterproof when it has been allowed to dry.

Tent waterproofing with a tarp

It’s always possible to add a waterproof tarp to your camping set up if the notion of treating your tent with a chemical-based treatment isn’t appealing to you or if you’ve put off tent waterproofing until the last minute. Build a tarp over your tent in the same manner as you would normally, making sure that your entire tent is completely covered. Consider where the water from the tarp will be draining to, and make sure this area is free of gear, shoes, and other items of clothing. Tent waterproofing may appear to be a time-consuming task, but it will help to extend the life of your tent by many years.

Read our post on eco-friendly camping for additional information on how to be a more environmentally conscious camper. Disclaimer: We utilize affiliate links and may gain a small reward if you make a purchase via one of our links.

How to Waterproof a Tent

The product has had 274 reviews, with an average rating of 4.4 out of 5 stars The sound of water trickling into your tent is one of the sounds of nature you don’t want to hear while you’re camping in the outdoors. If you’ve been through it, it’s time to reinforce the waterproofing of your shelter’s foundation. There are three different methods for waterproofing your tent:

  • Seal the seams: Using a seam sealant can help prevent moisture from leaking through the seams. The urethane coating on the interior of your rainfly and the floor of your tent are the principal barriers against moisture
  • Thus, it is important to keep them in good condition. Refresh the DWR: A durable water repellent (DWR) coating helps your rainfly drain water
  • Nevertheless, it can become brittle with time.

Video: How to Waterproof a Tent

A lot of tents are sold with seams that are sealed, but the sealant can wear out with time, allowing water to seep through the seams. If you discover a leaking seam, you’ll need the following supplies:

  • A rag, rubbing alcohol, seam sealant (be sure you acquire the proper type for your tent), and a pair of scissors are all needed. Cloth that has been silicone treated requires a different sealer than fabric that has been polyurethane coated. However, if you’re not sure what sort of fabric your tent is made of, you should check with the tent manufacturer.)
  • The majority of tents are made of polyurethane-coated textiles, but if you’re not sure, check with the tent manufacturer. Optional: a drop cloth to collect spillage

The following are the steps to seal seams:

  1. Set up your tent in a dry, sunny location or a well-lit room so that you can readily inspect all of the seams and gussets. Sew the underside of the fly and the inside of the tent body together to create a watertight seal. It is beneficial to put the fly on inside out so that you can get to the seams more easily. Remove any peeling parts of seam tape from the underneath of the fly, but leave the sections that are still in place if you locate any loose seam tape on the underside of the fly. Prepare the seams by carefully cleaning them with a cloth and rubbing alcohol before sewing them together. Then, using the new seam sealant, seal the seams. If one seam is beginning to break, it’s possible that the rest may follow suit soon after, therefore it’s a good idea to apply seam sealer to all of them. Allow the seam sealer to dry completely before using it.
See also:  What Is The Best Tent For Rain

Refreshing the Urethane Coating on a Tent

If you’ve observed anything peeling off of the interior of your rainfly or on the floor of your tent, it’s time to apply a fresh layer of urethane coating to the surface. Here’s everything you’ll need to get started:

  • The following items are required: a sponge with an abrasive side
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Tightening agent (again, be certain to use the correct type for your tent). Cloth that has been silicone treated requires a different sealer than fabric that has been polyurethane coated. However, if you’re not sure what sort of fabric your tent is made of, you should check with the tent manufacturer.)
  • The majority of tents are made of polyurethane-coated textiles, but if you’re not sure, check with the tent manufacturer.

The following is the procedure for applying tent sealant:

  1. With rubbing alcohol and a sponge, carefully clean the peeling coating off your rainfly and/or tent floor. Follow the directions on the container of tent sealant to apply a thin coat of the new tent sealer to the whole fly or tent floor
  2. Allow at least 24 hours for the new coating to cure before removing your tent from the ground. To eliminate any residue from sealant and coated tent materials, wash your hands well.

Refreshing the DWR on a Tent

If the rain is no longer beading up on your fly, you may reapply the durable water resistant (DWR) coating. Here’s everything you’ll need to get started:

  • A water-repellent substance that may be sprayed on
  • Water
  • A clean, moist cloth
  • A clean, damp cloth

The following is the procedure for applying the waterproof spray:

  1. Assemble the tent and clean the rainfly (if you just washed your tent, you don’t need to wait for it to dry before adding a fresh DWR coating)
  2. Spray the outside of the rainfly with the waterproofing spray, ensuring that it is uniformly coated. After a couple of minutes, use a moist towel and wipe away any extra coating that has accumulated. Prior to packing up the tent, allow it to thoroughly dry out.

Water-Repellent Treatments are available for purchase.

Related Articles

  • Tent Care Fundamentals
  • How to Repair a Tent
  • How to Set Up a Tent
  • Tent Maintenance

Contributing Experts

Chris Pottinger works at REI Co-op in Kent, Washington, as a senior tent designer.

Amazon.com: Scotchgard Outdoor Water Shield, 10.5 Ounces : Health & Household

3.0 stars out of 5 for this product Although there is some shelter from water, Atsko is preferable. On May 15, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States. Despite the fact that Scotchgard’s “Heavy Duty” Water Shield is effective at protecting fabrics from water, it is not without flaws. According to me, perfection is 0% absorption by the cloth, but I haven’t yet discovered it. Atsko Silicone Water-Guard has been my go-to product for many years. It appears to be a better alternative to Scotchgard, albeit it is still not ideal.

  • The label on the inside of my duster defines the fabric as follows: “Shell face is made entirely of cotton, with a polyurethane coating applied to the back.
  • A sleeve that has not been treated.
  • If you look at the photographs side by side, you’ll notice that the untreated sleeve contains water beads as well as dark patches where the water has been absorbed into the material (i.e., soaked through).
  • The Atsko region has the greatest amount of beading and the least amount of saturated patches.
  • Neither of them is without flaws.

Top reviews from the United States

On May 15, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States. 10.5 inches in height Review by an OunceVine customer of a free product (what exactly is it?) Purchase that has been verified Despite the fact that Scotchgard’s “Heavy Duty” Water Shield is effective at protecting fabrics from water, it is not without flaws. According to me, perfection is 0% absorption by the cloth, but I haven’t yet discovered it. I’ve been using Atsko Silicone Water-Guard for many years, and it appears to work better than Scotchgard, albeit it’s still not ideal, in my opinion.

  • The label on the inside of my duster defines the fabric as follows: “Shell face is made entirely of cotton, with a polyurethane coating applied to the back.
  • A sleeve that has not been treated.
  • If you look at the photographs side by side, you’ll notice that the untreated sleeve contains water beads as well as dark patches where the water has been absorbed into the material (i.e., soaked through).
  • The Atsko region has the greatest amount of beading and the least amount of saturated patches.
  • Neither of them is without flaws.
  • 3.0 stars out of 5 for this product Although there is some shelter from water, Atsko is preferable.
  • Despite the fact that Scotchgard’s “Heavy Duty” Water Shield is effective at protecting fabrics from water, it is not without flaws.

My experience with it has been positive, and it appears to be better than Scotchgard, albeit it is still not flawless.

The label on the inside of my duster defines the fabric as follows: “Shell face is made entirely of cotton, with a polyurethane coating applied to the back.

A sleeve that has not been treated.

If you look at the photographs side by side, you’ll notice that the untreated sleeve contains water beads as well as dark patches where the water has been absorbed into the material (i.e., soaked through).

The Atsko region has the greatest amount of beading and the least amount of saturated patches.

Neither of them is without flaws.

On December 23, 2018, a review was conducted in the United States.

Currently, I’m using the same can that I purchased eight months ago, and there is still some remaining in it.

After treating the hiking backpack (polyester bag) the night before, I made the mistake of putting it to the test earlier today.

Fortunately for me, all of my belongings were completely dry when I opened the box.

I recently purchased a pair of boots that will be worn largely outside.

The leather on the boots was exactly the same color as it had been before they were dried.

While they look to be a touch darker, I didn’t do a rigorous enough test to determine whether this is due to the spray or just to the boots being used on a regular basis.

Despite the fact that my boots have only been subjected to mild rain, damp grass, and puddles, the Scotchgard appears to be performing as intended.

Even if it were possible, I would not put my life at danger in this situation.

I usually glimpse a sliver of something that eventually gets absorbed.

So far, both my stuff and I have been completely dry in the rain, and I am really pleased with this product.

It performs just as intended, and there is no color degradation.

Size: 10.5 ouncesProduct Purchased with Confidence I bought this to waterproof some new Brooks running shoes, but when it arrived, I saw that the label said that it would turn the white rubber of the shoes yellow when exposed to sunlight.

Also, I was unable to return the scotchguard since it was deemed dangerous to send – despite the fact that it had only recently been delivered to me?

Size: 10.5 ouncesProduct Purchased with Confidence A lifesaver for those who want to camp in the Pacific Northwest.

This product worked like a charm!

In preparation for our most recent vacation, we set up our tent and I immediately began spraying it with the spray to ensure that it dried fast and that the fumes from the spray could be ventilated well.

On the second night, it poured buckets of rain.

We went back in and retracted that location, and from that point on, we were leakproof.

It did a good job of covering, and some of the cushions were twice sprayed.

If they come into contact with anything wet, they will absorb the moisture and remain wet until they are allowed to dry naturally.

If I had the option, I would give this a zero-star rating.

As previously said, I pointed out that the photo on Amazon depicts water beads rising to the top of a surface that has been treated with this product.

Based on my own experience, I would not suggest this product.

Size: 10.5 ouncesProduct Purchased with Confidence In the winter, use this for gloves, hats, shoes, and a snow suit to let youngsters play without getting soaked through their clothes and limit the number of outfits they have to change into.

No moisture helps youngsters keep comfortable, and snowball fifths endure longer, allowing for the completion of snowmen!

It is also important to spray in a well-ventilated area or outdoors because the fumes are intense and overspray on surrounding goods is unavoidable unless you put down plastic or use an outside door to apply the product.

Size: 10.5 ouncesProduct Purchased with Confidence So far, everything is going well.

It wasn’t until the next day that I realized what had happened.

Aside from that, we’ve been getting a lot of rain recently, and even though my outside furniture is beneath a covered patio, some of the rain still gets on the pieces.

This product has exceeded my expectations.

Size: 10.5 ouncesProduct Purchased with Confidence However, I had a pair of hiking shoes that would have been excellent had they been waterproof, which I typically avoid using hazardous things on myself.

So far, it’s lasted around 3 months (no need to repaint yet), and it hasn’t stained any of the fabrics (I don’t have leather, so I can’t speak on that). I’ve gone through low puddles and muck, and I’ve walked in the rain. There will be no damp feet!

Top reviews from other countries

4.0 stars out of 5 for this product good Size: 10.5 OunceVerified Purchase excellent. Reviewed in India on December 13, 2018Size: 10.5 Ounce (-) lasted for the duration of the delivery lead time.

The Best Way to Waterproof a Tent 2022

The following article is for you if you have ever gone camping in a downpour and woken up with drips on your face and a soaked-through tent, like described above. After years of trial and error, I’ve finally figured out the most effective technique to waterproof a camping tent. Continue reading to find out all you need to know!

Best waterproof products

What is the most effective method of waterproofing a nylon tent? Make use of a spray! I’ve discovered that spraying your tent with a waterproofing spray is the most effective and simplest method of making it waterproof to date. However, there are other excellent tent waterproofing products available on the market, like Nikwax waterproofing spray, which is my personal favorite. Following that, I’ll go into further detail about each of them.

Does Waterproof Spray Work on Tents?

Tents are extremely well-suited to the use of waterproofing spray. Despite the fact that it may require some maintenance over time, depending on what you use and how you handle your tent, it is a quick and effective way to protect yourself from adverse weather conditions.

Should You Waterproof Your Tent?

If you have recently acquired a new tent, there is a good probability that it is already water-resistant. Over time, though, it is possible that you may need to recoat it in order to maintain it watertight. The first step in waterproofing a tent is identifying the points at which water is leaking in. There there a tear in the tent’s fabric, or is the water soaking through the cloth. Make a visual inspection of the seams to see whether there is a leak in the seam that is allowing water to enter your tent.

Using a waterproofing spray on the exterior of your tent is a good idea if you notice that water is seeping through the fabric of your tent’s structure.

How Do You Make a Cheap Tent Waterproof?

If you have purchased a low-cost tent that does not have any actual water repellency, spraying it with a waterproofing spray is a perfect answer to your problem. The majority of fine tents are equipped with a waterproof covering and sealed seams, although these may be rather expensive! In order to conserve money or if you do not camp frequently, getting a low-cost tent and a can of waterproofing spray can save you a lot of money.

See also:  How To Build A Wedding Tent

Do Tents Lose Their Waterproofing?

Tents can lose some of their waterproofing properties over time, making them less resistant to moisture infiltration. A waterproofing spray should be used any time you see water seeping into your tent or if you can see the coating peeling off on your tent’s surface. It is possible for waterproof coatings to fall off when your tent is not properly cared for or stored. If your tent is excessively dirty or if it is not allowed to completely dry after being used, it might cause the waterproof coating to wear off more quickly than normal.

When not in use, take excellent care of your tent by keeping it clean and storing it in a sealed, dry location. This will help to extend the waterproofing of your tent’s fabric.

How Often Do Tents Need Waterproofing?

This is dependent on the material of your tent, the type of spray you use, and how often you use your tent. Waterproofing your tent may be determined by spraying it with a hose and seeing if the water beads up and rolls off, or whether it soaks into the fabric at any time throughout the process.

What Is the Best Tent for Rain?

Instead of constantly waterproofing your tent, you might consider purchasing one that is particularly designed to endure rain. After extensive testing under severe weather conditions, I’ve discovered that the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx is the best rain tent available. It is constructed of entirely waterproof fabrics, such as polyester, that completely wick away water and keep the inside of the bag completely dry. It features water-resistant seams and is designed to survive wet and rainy weather conditions.

Product Reviews

After years of testing product after product, I’ve whittled down my list to provide you with the information you need to select the finest waterproofing spray for your individual requirements. Here are my top five picks for the best waterproofing sprays for tents to use in 2021, based on my research.

Nikwax Tent and Gear Cleaning, Waterproofing, and UV Protection

Nikwax’s tent waterproofing spray is excellent, and it is widely considered to be the finest tent waterproofing spray on the market. It totally waterproofed my tent and gave UV protection, which prevented it from degrading as rapidly as it would have if left out in the sun. It helps to preserve your equipment in better shape and to resuscitate outdated equipment that you may no longer be able to use. This versatile spray may be used on a variety of items such as tents, backpacks, boat coverings, umbrellas, outdoor furniture, and so much more.

It is also environmentally friendly.

What makes this product even better is the fact that it is reasonably priced and does not require frequent repurchase.

Although it did not give the long-term durability that some of the other products did, the convenience with which it could be applied and the fact that it provided sun protection propelled it to the top of my ranking.

Pros:

  • Provides both UV protection and waterproofing in one package
  • Easily degradable and non-hazardous to the environment As you spray it on, it begins to remove dirt. A single bottle is plenty for practically every tent.

Cons:

  • It is possible that discoloration will occur
  • Thus, a spot test should be performed before usage. Not as long-lasting as other sprays

KIWI Camp Dry Water Repellent

Kiwi Camp Dry water repellent is a convenient spray that can be used to protect nearly everything from the elements. The material totally wicks away all water droplets, resulting in your gear being waterproof rather than water-resistant instead. Because this spray was designed particularly for camping gear, it is extremely robust and will last for an extended period of time. The fact why this spray repels water so well is due to the presence of silicone in it, which prevents water from seeping into any fabric or seams while still enabling the garment to breathe.

It has no odor and is quite simple to use.

One can is enough to coat my seven-person tent twice as thoroughly as two other cans! I discovered that you will need to spray more than one layer over your tent, but once you get it well covered, there is no moisture passing through at all!

Pros:

  • Using silicone, it is possible to make a totally watertight barrier
  • One may purchase a big tent and other items more than once, and one can last for several months. A fine mist of product is sprayed over the surface and does not drop or run down the material. In my view, the most durable waterproof spray available on the market

Cons:

  • Fabrics may become discolored or darkened as a result of this product
  • Test a small area first. It will take some time for the waterproofing to completely function

New Waterproofing Spray Fabric Protector Spray

Although designed for use on boat covers, this waterproofing spray from a better boat also works well on tents! It totally waterproofs any fabric or vinyl, causing the water to ball up and wick away from the fabric or vinyl surface. With this spray, you may add or repair water repellency to any of your camping equipment, including tents, boat coverings, chairs, tarps, RV canvases, shoes, and other items of clothing. Spraying upholstery with this non-hazardous, water-based product will keep it dry and prevent it from becoming saturated by rain or other water sources.

According to my research, this product was the most effective at restoring previously waterproof materials.

Pros:

  • Product that is reasonably priced
  • Simple to use
  • Does not have an impact on the color of the material
  • Restores the water repellency of materials that were previously water resistant

Cons:

  • Using it on materials that aren’t already water-resistant is not a good idea
  • It must be reapplied at least once every season, if not more frequently.

Bayes High-Performance Fabric Protectant Spray for Indoor and Outdoor Use

It is appropriate for both indoor and outdoor use, according to Bayes. It is designed to repel water, stains, and UV rays, among other things. It is created using a water-based spray, which means it does not include any potentially dangerous ingredients such as petroleum distillates or acetone. It is completely safe to use on your household furnishings as well as on your harsh outdoor equipment. In the event that you are seeking for a wonderful all-around protectant to preserve your tent in immaculate condition, this is the product for you!

It keeps your belongings dry and prevents stains from forming.

It prevents your tent from being dehydrated or bleached as a result of exposure to the sun.

Pros:

  • Excellent for practically any application
  • Use with confidence on your camping equipment as well as on your home’s furnishings. The product is water-based and non-toxic. The product is environmentally friendly. It is simple to use
  • Water, filth, and the sun are all kept at bay.

Cons:

  • Although it is not totally waterproof, it helps tents to be more water-resistant. The spray is not as long-lasting as the other products on the list.

Scotchgard Outdoor Water Shield

Each of the sprays in this list is effective at preventing waterproofing on polyester and nylon tents, but what if you have a canvas tent to contend with? When it comes to waterproofing canvas, this Scotchgard spray is the best option available! There are several applications for this non-toxic spray, which includes boat covers, backpacks, boots, outdoor furniture, tents, rain fly and a variety of other items. When I tested the other sprays on my canvas tent, I was underwhelmed by their results.

Although it is inexpensive, the one disadvantage I discovered was that you would need to purchase numerous cans of the product in order to completely cover any tent.

Two and a half bottles of water were required to thoroughly cover my biggest tent.

Pros:

  • Canvas tents are the only type of tent I’ve discovered that works well with this product. Despite the fact that it is sprayed on, it enables your cloth to breathe. Affordably priced
  • No lingering smell

Cons:

  • In order to cover a tent, at least two cans are required. It is necessary to reapply as time progresses

Conclusion

There you have it, a step-by-step instruction to properly waterproofing your tent. If you have observed moisture escaping into your tent or drops dropping over your sleeping bag, investing in an excellent waterproofing spray may make your old tent seem like it is brand new once again. I recommend usingNikwax spray for complete waterproofing as well as UV protection and a clean surface to avoid any future problems. There are several comparable items, on the other hand, that function excellently and have outcomes that are comparable.

For example, if you have a canvas tent, you will need to use a product such asScotchgard Outdoor Water Shield to protect the fabric from moisture.

No matter which sprays you use, make sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully and to keep your tent in excellent condition in order to get the greatest effects. Have a great time camping!

can it be used on tents?

Unread, 11th of January, 1999, 9:00 a.m.1/11/99to Hello there once more. I’ll keep it short and sweet. When I asked the guy at the hardware shop for advice on how to better waterproof my tent, he advised using Scotch Guard. It appears to be a nylon synthetic material on the Coleman 2-man dome tent. Would Scotch Guard be detrimental to the tent, or are there any other products that would be more appropriate? Some of the brands that have been mentioned, such as Seam Grip, Seam Seal, and others, are not readily available in Malaysia.

Regards, Jason [email protected] is an email address.

H. Paul Jacobson

Unread, 11th of January, 1999, 9:00 a.m.1/11/99to Jason Khoo wrote on the 11th of January, 1999, “Just a fast one.” Inquiring about other possibilities for waterproofing my tent, I spoke with the gentleman at the hardware shop, who recommended using Scotch Guard. What is the best product to put on a Coleman 2-man dome tent? I believe it is composed of nylon synthetics; would Scotch Guard harm the tent, or is there anything else I should apply instead? Some of the brands that have been mentioned are not readily available in Malaysia, and I am unable to locate them: Seam Grip, Seam Seal, and so on.

  1. Scotch Gard is a water repellent for outdoor clothes, according to the label on the can that I have in my possession.
  2. They also specifically mention “shiny surface synthetics (nylon, etc.).
  3. There are different Scotchgard products available for carpets, leather, and other surfaces.
  4. Instead, the water condenses into tiny beads that slide off the cloth.
  5. Depending on whether or not you have something to plug the seam holes, it may even be possible to limit the quantity of water that seeps through them.
  6. There is a greater requirement for protection from standing water in that location.
  7. One of the most straightforward methods of boosting the waterproofness of the floor is to place a wide sheet of plastic (a few mils thick) inside the tent and wrap it around the floor and up the sides a few inches.
  8. Seam Seal is used to seal the gaps in a seam that might allow water to seep through.
  9. Essentially, it is a form of thin adhesive that is used to fill in the gaps and holes in a seam joint.

You might also verify with the folks that work on the boats. Sailboats require a variety of different types of waterproofing. While the materials they employ on cotton or acrylic canvas are unlikely to be of assistance, coated dacron or nylon may prove to be beneficial. Paul

ORBS Free Outdoor Classifieds/ORBS Escrow

Unread, Monday, January 12, 1999, 9:00 a.m.1/12/99to As a result of the [email protected],[email protected] was able to contact the author. XXXwrote: Scotch Guard, Thompsons, and a number of other firms provide silicone-based sprays that are particularly designed for use on outdoor textiles. For lighter fabrics, it may be necessary to test a patch to determine whether the spray discolors it beforehand, and to read any warnings that may be included with the product. Thompson Water Seal should not be used on textiles.

Using TWS will void many warranties and other agreements.

DANIEL OWEN FIELD

Unread, January 12, 1999, 9:00 a.m.1/12/99toSnip big posting, January 12, 1999, 9:00 a.m. If you’re looking to use 3M Scothch or any other waterproofing spray, the long and the short of it is “If its a breathable membrane fabric,dont spray it.” Warm water in a net stuff bag placed through the washing machine will do the trick. Once the clothes are out of the washer, a 30 minute spin in the dryer will do wonders (The fabrics properties are enhanced if heated after washing) Dan Field is an American actor and director who is most known for his role in the film The Great Gatsby.

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John Oliveri

Unread, Monday, January 12, 1999, 9:00 a.m.1/12/99to The only time I’d use it is on an old tent, because it makes the tent waterproof but not breathable at all. Eugene Miya replied to message77e4qi$ [email protected] with a message.

Eugene Miya

Unread, January 13, 1999, 9:00 a.m. to January 13, 1999, 9:00 a.m. to January 13, 1999, 9:00 a.m. to John [email protected] wrote the following in [email protected]: I would only use it on an old tent since it makes the tent waterproof but not breathable, which is what I was looking for. It’s all up to you. Thompsons has issued the customary warning, and I’m just passing it along to you. They notably mention Sport Seal as an example.

John Reece

Unread, 14th of January, 1999, 9:00 a.m. to 1st of January, 1999, 9:00 a.m. to Thompson Water Seal should not be used on textiles, according to Eugene Miya. Sports Seal is a different product from the rest of the line. Using TWS will void many warranties and other agreements. It also causes a fire danger since it effectively transforms your tent or clothing into a wick for a campfire. Keep in mind the warnings regarding how to store paint rags. Actual spontaneous combustion may even be a possibility in some circumstances.

This is not an Intel spokesperson.

Waterproofing tent with “scotchguard”?

Unread, April 25, 1995, 9:00 a.m.4/25/95to4/25/95 Hello there, everyone! In my Eureka tent, which is five years old, I’ve noticed that it has been becoming damp/wet after recent rainstorms. Is this typical for tents that are this old? When I originally acquired it, I had no problems with it, even in torrential downpours.

Originally, I had considered spraying the entire tent with “scotchguard” to help keep it watertight. Is this a good idea or a bad one? Exist any other items that are effective for water-proofing tents that I should be aware of? If you tell me my tent is done, please don’t tell me! Carl

Douglas Murray

Unread, April 26, 1995, 9:00 a.m. to4/26/95to4/26/95to4/26/95to It is fairly uncommon for a tent to begin leaking after a couple of seasons of use. My experience with coated nylon tents has shown me that whether you buy a cheap tent or an expensive tent, they are both good for around 150 to 200 service days of usage. Following that, leaks begin to appear, and the tent eventually becomes more hassle than it is worth. It is best to base your selection on the fairly worst conditions you anticipate using your tent in when deciding whether to invest $100 or $500 on a tent.

If you’re on an exposed ridge with 50 mph winds, a bomb-proof adventure “A-frame” is definitely the best option for your shelter needs.

Ultimately, it is less expensive to purchase a gallon of Thompson’s Waterseal or another bulk waterproofer and apply it to the tent using a brush or a sprayer.

A gallon of bulk waterproofer will coat a modest mountain tent two or three times, as well as a nylon windbreaker or two; this is far more cost-effective than purchasing individual aerosol cans of waterproofer.

Dale Lindsley

Unread, April 26, 1995, 9:00 a.m. to4/26/95to4/26/95to4/26/95to CarlHK posted the following message on April 25, 1995: “Hey everyone! In my Eureka tent, which is five years old, I’ve noticed that it has been becoming damp/wet after recent rainstorms. Is this typical for tents that are this old? When I originally acquired it, I had no problems with it, even in torrential downpours. I was thinking of spraying the entire tent with “scotchguard” to help it become more water resistant. Is this a good idea or a bad one?

If you tell me my tent is done, please don’t tell me!

D.L.

Andy Hiltz

Unread, April 27, 1995, 9:00 a.m.4/27/[email protected]/27/[email protected] Hi there, everyone! (CarlHK) wrote: In my Eureka tent, which is five years old, I’ve noticed that it has been becoming damp/wet after recent rainstorms. Is this typical for tents that are this old? When I originally acquired it, I had no problems with it, even in torrential downpours. If you’ve been using your tent on a regular basis, the problem is most likely related to a breakdown in the fabric/urethane covering as a result of ultraviolet damage (UV degradation).

  • I had a similar problem with an NF VE-24 in my previous job.
  • I attempted to seal the seams using seam sealer since I suspected that this was the source of the leaking problem, but it made absolutely no difference at all.
  • To my astonishment, they had made a tiny modification to the VE’s measurements, and they advised that I return the entire tent to them for review.
  • Talk about putting your money behind a “Lifetime Guarantee.” Before you do anything further, I would recommend that you try to re-waterproof the fly.

I know it sounds weird, but nylon can only withstand so much exposure to ultraviolet radiation before it begins to fade. In order to mitigate some of the UV problems, several of the older tent makers made their tents with dacron. Andy

Dale Brown

Unread, April 27, 1995, 9:00 a.m.4/27/[email protected]/27/[email protected] Hi there, everyone! (CarlHK) wrote: In my Eureka tent, which is five years old, I’ve noticed that it has been becoming damp/wet after recent rainstorms. Is this typical for tents that are this old? When I originally acquired it, I had no problems with it, even in torrential downpours. Carl, First and foremost, pay close attention to the fabric. Thoroughly clean the surface, being sure to remove any peeling Urethane. Isopropyl alcohol should now be used to thoroughly clean it.

(about $5?) Use any methods required to get the fabric as taut as possible.

Just make sure to follow the manufacturer’s directions.

Give it a chance; Thompson’s W is good down to about -30 degrees Fahrenheit or something comparable.

Stuart Hayes

Unread, April 27, 1995, 9:00 a.m.4/27/95toIn article3nk6gl$ [email protected]/27/95toIn article3nk6gl$ [email protected] [email protected] Hey there, everyone! (CarlHK) writes: In my Eureka tent, which is five years old, I’ve noticed that it has been becoming damp/wet after recent rainstorms. Is this typical for tents that are this old? When I originally acquired it, I had no problems with it, even in torrential downpours. When I took a number of my Eurekas Timberlines to the Canadian distributor (Johnson Distributors, S.

The substance appears to be weakened by ultraviolet light.

These days, nothing is built to survive indefinitely.

Amdahl Corporation, nor Amdahl Canada Ltd., necessarily hold the same viewpoints as me.

Bud Kuenzli

The time is 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, April 29, 1995. 4/29/95to Hello there, everyone! In my Eureka tent, which is five years old, I’ve noticed that it has been becoming damp/wet after recent rainstorms. Is this typical for tents that are this old? When I originally acquired it, I had no problems with it, even in torrential downpours. I was thinking of spraying the entire tent with “scotchguard” to help it become more water resistant. Is this a good idea or a bad one? Are there any other products available that are effective for water proofing tents?

  • Carl Carl, I’m going to email you a file that I created for someone else who was looking for information on seam sealing.
  • Preparing my tent for the summer is an important part of my summer preparations.
  • I carefully scrutinize the fly and double-check all of the seams.
  • Then it is dried by air (not a drier).
  • Spray the fly with a little mist over the entire outer fly, being sure to cover the entire outer fly.
  • This applies to tents and apparel that is intended to be water resistant.
  • This will actually make waterproof gear more comfortable to wear.

If the outer layer does not bead and shed water, the gore-tex will not perform as effectively as it could otherwise.

The flaking problem is caused, I believe, by the fact that individuals are still using the Seam Sealer product from K-Kote, which has been on the market for more than two decades.

It is by a long shot superior.

If you want to perform a fantastic job for severe weather, just putting up the tent will take a couple of hours.

If you want to use Seam Grip to its full potential, you must start with clean seams.

However, if the flaky patches on an old seam are not too large and if you can adequately cover the entire old seam sealer with new seam sealer, it will not be necessary to entirely remove the old seam sealer from the tent.

This Seam Grip material is extremely durable, wears well, and adheres well as well.

This will stretch the cloth and allow the pores of the fabric stitching holes to become more visible and accessible.

(This is not critical.) Then prepare the seam grip and brush, as well as some Isopropyl alcohol and a little sponge, before you start working on the seam.

Remove a length of seam from the machine and clean it down with an alcohol wipe.

The objective is that all seams must be clean and free of oil from your hands and body.) It is not necessary to soak the surface with alcohol; simply brush it with a sponge to clean the surface is sufficient.

Then, using the brush, apply the seam sealer UNDER the seam fold as well as on top of the seam where the stitching is clearly visible.

Add an extra 1/16″ or 1/8″ on either side of the seam fold and past the stitching itself, then continue down the seam to the bottom.

This is really fantastic stuff.

I use tent sealant on both sides of a seam to keep my tent in place.

With time and experience, you will develop a decent brushing technique that will save you time and effort.

You’re not painting with a brush, as you may think.

It has a substantial thickness.

I’m not sure what they name it, but it reduces the amount of time required for setup, which is generally approximately 12 hours.

You won’t be able to discern a difference in the finished product; it simply takes less time to put together.

Prepare a small container (which can be open or closed) in which to store the brush.

When you hunt for isopropyl alcohol, you will discover that the majority of it is made up of water.

It is available and will perform far better.

I cleaned it, dried it thoroughly, bent it, then applied a mixture of seam grip and catalyst (this was out on an Island in Prince William Sound while paddling with my wife).

When I was on that trip, I used Seam Grip and catalyst on a number of “repairs.” After duct tape, it is a staple in my repair kit, and it is the item that I reach for the most frequently.

I strongly advise you to use an isopropyl alcohol solution to remove the old flaky seam sealant material before proceeding with this.

Even if you are successful in getting the flaky material off everywhere, you will not be successful in getting it off everything.

It may be used to repair minor tears and is really effective! No way, don’t sell it, especially in this business. Just an Alaskan outdoorsman who is quite pleased with this product! [email protected] Bud Kuenzli lives in the North Pole region of Alaska. wl7cik

[email protected]

I haven’t read anything yet today, June 12, 2018, 1:57:51 PM 6/12/18to Hello, did you use a solvent-based sealer or a water-based sealer?

[email protected]

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[email protected]

Unread, The time is 7:29:23 p.m. on July 23, 2020. 7/23/20to Hey! If you are still offering those loans, we would want to inquire about a $100K loan for a business endeavor that has been provided to us. Please respond with your corporate email address as well as your bank account details so that we may send you information about a $25,000 cashier’s check as security for my $100,000 business venture finance. Thank you. With best wishes, Sara Burns and Esther Proof-Vestiturian are two of the most talented women in the world.

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