What Is An Oxygen Tent

Oxygen tent – Wikipedia

A baby that has been placed beneath an oxygen tent It is a canopy placed over the patient’s head and shoulders or over the complete body in order to supply oxygen at a greater level than is normally provided. Some gadgets are only effective on a portion of the face. Some people confuse oxygen tents with altitude tents, which are used by athletes and anyone who want to adapt to greater altitudes. However, the oxygen concentration of altitude tents is far lower. This type of medication is frequently offered in cases when patients are having difficulties breathing, such as asthma.

Most of the time, the tent is composed of a translucent plastic material.

The container frequently features a zippered side entrance on one side.

Benefits

Patients generally benefit from oxygen treatment because it allows them to get more oxygen into their lungs and, as a result, into their tissues. In most cases, the therapy increases the amount of oxygen in the blood, reduces the burden on the heart, and makes breathing easier to do. It can help to alleviate symptoms of respiratory disorders such as coughing and dry secretions by reducing inflammation. Oxygen treatment may be recommended for patients suffering from lung disorders, heart issues, carbon monoxide poisoning, and it may also be supplied to patients undergoing surgery.

Hazards

Increased oxygen levels enhance the risk of fire, both in terms of igniting and spreading, as well as in terms of causing damage. Many things that do not burn in air will ignite and burn when exposed to a high concentration of oxygen. Extinguishing a fire in an atmosphere with high oxygen content is more challenging.

Precautions

When utilizing an oxygen tent, it is generally suggested that you take certain precautions. One of the precautions is to avoid opening the tent on a regular basis. If the tent is opened to provide care for the patient, the edges must be tucked in to prevent oxygen from escaping through the opening. General caution should be exercised while smoking or having any combustible materials in the presence of an oxygen device. In addition, using an electronic device while inside an oxygen tent might be dangerous.

See also

  • Oxygen therapy is the administration of oxygen for medicinal purposes. Oxygen mask: This device serves as a link between the oxygen delivery system and the user.

References

  • Medical breakthroughs include the use of an oxygen tent. What is the definition of an Oxygen Tentat? Store for oxygen concentrators
  • What is an Oxygen Tent, and how does it work?

Oxygen Tent – What You Need to Know

Drugs.com has conducted a medical review of this product. The most recent update was made on February 1, 2022.

What is it?

  • An oxygen tent is a foldable piece of translucent plastic that is supported by a frame and placed over your child’s bed or cot. After that, the plastic is tucked under the mattress. A croup, mist, or Ohio tent are all names for this type of tent. The tent is filled with either oxygen or ordinary air. Oxygen is a colorless gas that cannot be detected by the human senses, yet it is a critical component of the air we breathe. If oxygen is blown into the tent, the oxygen content of the air surrounding your youngster will be significantly greater than normal. Aside from that, the tent allows your youngster to roam around on his bed without the need to wear an oxygen mask. Your child’s caregivers may determine that he or she requires humidified (hew-mih-dih-fide) air or oxygen. The term “humidified” refers to the addition of moisture to the oxygen or ordinary air that is being blown into the tent. As your child breathes, the humidity in the air helps to prevent the loss of water from his body. It is also possible that high humidity will thin your child’s phlegm (lung mucus and saliva or spit).

Why does your child need an oxygen tent?

It is no longer necessary to utilize oxygen tents on a regular basis. However, they are still employed in the treatment of severe respiratory disorders in children, such as croup. It is a viral illness that affects the vocal cords as well as the voice box, windpipe, and lungs (upper airways of the lungs). Croup causes these tissues to expand and constrict, making it more difficult for air to enter and exit the lungs as a result of the disease.

This illness is frequent in babies and children between the ages of three months and three years. Inquire with your caregiver about the CareNotesTM handout that contains information on your child’s breathing problem.

Care:

If your kid is experiencing severe breathing difficulties, he or she may need to be admitted to the hospital. It may be necessary to utilize an oxygen tent to provide your youngster with humidified oxygen. It might take up to 5 to 6 days for your youngster to feel better.

  • A hospitalization may be necessary in the case of severe respiratory issues in your youngster. If your kid need humidified oxygen, an oxygen tent may be employed. It might take up to 5 to 6 days for your youngster to feel more normal again.
  • You will be able to view your child, but you will not be able to physically hold him. Maintain a close proximity to your youngster where he can see you and, if at all feasible, inform him that you will not be leaving
  • As soon as your child starts crying, the carers will instruct you how to reach inside the tent and touch his head or back. Taking your youngster out of the tent every time he screams is detrimental to his or her development. Your youngster will receive a “prize” for weeping as a result of this. It won’t take long for him to realize that crying will allow him to be let out of the tent. Bring a favorite toy, stuffed animal, or blanket for your child to the hospital with you. Your youngster can play with toys that are not sharp or hazardous inside the tent if they are not sharp or harmful. This will assist him in reducing his fear. Because of the noises made by the machine that supplies oxygen and humidity to the tent, your youngster may be afraid of it. Inform your youngster that the machine will not cause him any harm. In order to prevent a baby’s hearing from being damaged by loud noises, caregivers may put a gauze pad over his ears.
  • You will be able to view your kid, but you will not be able to physically hold him or her. Ensure that you are visible to your youngster and, if at all feasible, inform him that you will not be leaving. If your infant screams, carers will instruct you on how to reach inside the tent and rub his head or back with your fingers. Taking your youngster out of the tent every time he screams is detrimental to his well-being. Your youngster will receive a “prize” for weeping as a result of this action. As time progresses, he will come to understand that crying will allow him to exit the tent. Bring a favorite toy, stuffed animal, or blanket for your child to the hospital with him or her. Toys that are neither sharp or harmful can be used by your youngster to play inside the tent. As a result, his anxiety will be lessened. Because of the noises made by the machine that supplies oxygen and humidity to the tent, your toddler may be afraid to enter. You should assure your youngster that he will not be harmed by the machine. In order to prevent a baby’s hearing from being damaged by loud noises, caregivers might tape a gauze pad over his ears.
  • You will be able to view your child, but you will not be able to hold him. Maintain a close proximity to your youngster where he can see you and, if at all feasible, inform him that you will not be leaving. If your kid screams, caregivers will demonstrate how to reach inside the tent and touch his head or back. It is critical that you do not remove your infant from the tent every time he screams. Your youngster will feel “rewarded” for weeping as a result of this. It won’t take long for him to realize that crying will allow him to be let out of the tent
  • Bring a favorite toy, stuffed animal, or blanket for your child to the hospital. Inside the tent, your kid may play with toys that are neither sharp or potentially hazardous. This will assist him in reducing his fear
  • Because of the noises made by the machine that supplies oxygen and humidity to the tent, your toddler may be afraid to go inside. Inform your youngster that he will not be injured by the machine. Caregivers may tape a gauze pad over a baby’s ears to prevent his hearing from being damaged by loud noises.
  • Other precautions you should take to ensure your child’s safety while in an oxygen tent are as follows:
  • Never leave your child’s bed or crib without first lowering the side rails to their level. This is easy to overlook since the tent gives the impression that your kid cannot fall off the bed
  • But, if the plastic tent presses against your child’s mouth and nose, he or she might suffocate (not obtain enough oxygen). Keeping the tent tightly tucked beneath the mattress can help reduce the likelihood of this happening. Additionally, staying with your child will assist him in remaining calm. This reduces the likelihood of his being entangled in the tent when attempting to exit
  • It is possible that your youngster will require feeding while inside the tent at first. This is due to the fact that sucking and feeding consume a significant amount of oxygen. Your kid’s caregivers will demonstrate how to reach inside the tent, or how to lift the canvas and lean inside to feed your child. The caregivers will inform you when it is safe to begin feeding your kid outside of the tent. Even if your child is permitted to eat outside the tent, he or she may require more oxygen. The oxygen is administered by the use of a nasal cannula. On one end of the tube, there is a connection to the oxygen supply. The other end is equipped with short, thin tubes that are inserted into his nostrils.
See also:  How To Shade A Tent

Care Agreement

You have the right to participate in the planning of your child’s care. Understand your child’s respiratory condition and how an oxygen tent can aid him or her before you can assist with this strategy. You and your kid’s caretakers can then review the many therapy choices available to your youngster. Work with them to determine the type of care that will be provided for your kid.

Further information

Always check with your healthcare practitioner to confirm that the information contained on this page is accurate and applicable to your specific situation. Disclaimer of Medical Importance

Oxygen Tents are a Training Technique for Athletics.

Ensure that the information shown on this page is accurate for your specific situation by consulting with a healthcare practitioner. Affirmation of medical need

About Scott Ridl:

Always check with your healthcare practitioner to be sure the information on this page is accurate for your specific situation. Notice of Medical Obligation

Oxygen Tent

Galeviews were last updated on June 27th, 2018. Around the year 1900, French physician Charles Michel (1850-1935) understood the value of oxygen in the recovery process from respiratory disorders. Michel was the first to recognize the importance of oxygen in the recovery process from respiratory ailments. Through the delivery of pure oxygen to the lung tissues, and ultimately into the bloodstream, oxygen assisted the patients in breathing better and being more awake. Michel began by wrapping a tiny foldable container over the patient’s head, but the oxygen tent, as it was subsequently known, was quickly enlarged to encompass the full bed of the patient.

Tent Use and Design

When a patient is suffering from respiratory issues, oxygen tents are the most commonly employed treatment option. The oxygen tent can be used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning as well as diseases such as pneumonia. Additionally, the tents are employed after an occurrence in which the patient’s body has been deprived of oxygen. There is a greater concentration of oxygen in the gas within the tent than is ordinarily present in the surrounding air. With each breath taken while a patient is enclosed in the tent, he or she is consuming more oxygen per unit of time.

The tent completely isolates the patient from the surrounding environment, allowing him or her to breathe only the oxygen-rich air that is pushed into the tent from the top.

Additionally, the quantity of moisture (humidity) in the tent is regulated in order to prevent the lungs from becoming too dry.

oxfordviews was last modified on May 17, 2018.

An enclosure of material surrounding a patient in bed (typically made of clear plastic) that allows gas or vapour to be introduced as part of the treatment process a tent into which oxygen is introduced 2.a piece of dried vegetable material, generally a seaweed stem, that is fashioned to fit into an opening, such as the cervical canal, in order to relieve pain.

A Nursing Terminology Dictionary Updated on June 8, 2018 at oxfordviews An oxygen tent is an enclosure in which the air supply may be enhanced with oxygen in order to assist a patient in breathing more easily.

The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English (also known as the Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English)

Amazon.com : Oxygen Tents

THE RESULTSPrice and other information may differ depending on the product size and color selected. Get it between Friday, February 11 and Tuesday, February 22. extremely well-liked sponsored | based on the number of customer ratings and the number of stars At the time of purchase, a $20.00 coupon was applied. With the voucher, you may save $20.00. Ships to the Netherlands are available. Only 7 of these items are left in stock – purchase soon.

KTT Large Tent 8~10 Person,Family Cabin Tents,2 Rooms,Straight Wall,3 Doors and 3 Windows with Mesh,Waterproof,Double Layer,Big Tent for Outdoor,Picnic,Camping,Family,Friends Gathering.

A 5% discount is applied at the time of purchase. Save up to 5 percent with this discount (on certain sizes and colors). Ships to the Netherlands are available. Only 9 of these items are left in stock – purchase soon. Ships to the Netherlands are available. Only 19 of these items are left in stock – purchase soon. It’s yours. From Wednesday, February 23 through Thursday, March 10 Order quickly as there are only 5 left in stock. At checkout, a ten percent discount is applied. With the voucher, you may save 10%.

  • With the coupon, you may save 5 percent.
  • Only 11 of these items are left in stock – purchase soon.
  • With the voucher, you may save 10%.
  • There are only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
  • There are only 4 left in stock, so act quickly.
  • Order quickly as there are only 5 left in stock.
  • Save Ships to the Netherlands are available.
  • Brands that are associated with your search

Oxygen Enclosures – Virtual Museum

Oxygen tents, hoods, incubators, and hyperbaric chambers are among the equipment on display. Tents for containing oxygen In this section, you will find photographs of emergency oxygen tents. The Oxygen Tent from the 1920s An early oxygen tent, dating from the 1920s, is depicted here. Image courtesy of Steve Adult Oxygen Tent, designed by Mary DeGenaro in 1932. An oxygen tent from the year 1932 is displayed. courtesy of Felix Khusid1932 Pediatric Tent picture A pediatric oxygen tent is seen in this photograph taken in 1932.

  1. The 1934 Oxygen Tent, courtesy of Steve and Mary DeGenaro.
  2. The 1934 Oxygen Tent, courtesy of Steve and Mary DeGenaro.
  3. 1930s Premie Tent photo courtesy of Steve and Mary DeGenaro This photograph from the 1930s depicts an oxygen tent that was used to treat a preterm newborn at Boston Children’s Hospital in the early 1900s.
  4. The Oxygen Tent from the 1940s In this photograph, an adult oxygen tent from the 1940s is displayed.
  5. The Bunn Oxygen Tent was built in 1956.
  6. Their refrigomatic type, which could be used in conjunction with Alevaire and could “generate 100 percent oxygen,” was featured in this 1956 advertisement.
  7. This photograph, taken in April 1950, depicts an adult oxygen tent.
See also:  How Much Does A Camping Tent Cost

Mechanette Original Equipment Manufacturer Between 1956 and 1964, the OEM Mechanette Pediatric Tent was in use in the United States.

Tent for OEM Mechanette The components of an OEM Mechanette oxygen tent are shown in this illustration.

Croupette The Air-Shields Croupette made use of ice to keep the temperature in the canopy at a comfortable level.

1960 Ad for Pediatric Tents That Do Not Require Ice When INHALATION THERAPY magazine published this advertisement for the “ice-free” OEM Mechanette pediatric oxygen tent in the 1960s, I thought it was kind of cool.

Through a panel at the head of the bed, chilled water was piped in from the refrigeration unit.

1967 Cameto’s Patent on an Oxygen Tent The 1967 Patent for “Oxygen Tent Atmospheric Conditioning Apparatus” by L.

Cameto was issued.

Warning labels were posted to pediatric canopy enclosures to remind visitors to get clearance before placing toys within the canopy enclosure to verify that they were safe.

A completely erected Ohio 360 Pediatric tent is displayed in this photograph.

Chamber for Oxygen This section contains information about oxygen chambers that are meant to provide greater FIO2 throughout a complete room, rather than simply into a canopy.

The “Oxygen Chamber” is seen in the design for J.F.

Image courtesy of David Lucas Oxygen hoods are a type of protective clothing that protects the wearer from the elements.

Oxygen hood from the 1940s A non-disposable, transparent chamber was used to administer supplementary oxygen to the patient’s head, which was not disposable.

Image courtesy of Steve Mary DeGeneres is a well-known actress.

The “Hood for Oxygen Therapy” invented by C.

Lamberteen was given a patent in 1947.

Using an Oxygen Hood By using an oxygen hood, a regulated oxygen-enriched atmosphere may be supplied to a newborn baby.

1995 Using an Oxygen Hood In this photo from 1995, a respiratory therapist is shown watching a newborn who is wearing an oxygen hood to keep him warm.

DisposaHood was popular in the 1990s.

Illustrated with an image from the Illinois Central College Archives from 1999 to 1995.

Karen Schell provided the image.

Hyperbaric Chamber built in 1924 The Mt.

Aracely Bigelow provided this image from a collection she has amassed.

In 1928, Dr.

Cunningham established a massive hyperbaric chamber in Cleveland, Ohio, which is still in operation today.

Following the stock market crisis of 1929, the institution experienced financial difficulties and was forced to shut.

Image courtesy of Roger Huber The Oxygen Sanitarium is a facility that provides oxygen to patients.

According to the information on this postcard, the facility is an oxygen sanitarium.

Photograph courtesy of Steve and Mary DeGenaro Linde’s Mobile Hyperbaric Chamber from the 1960s This advertisement for Linde’s transportable hyperbaric chamber was published in a 1960s edition of the magazine INHALATION THERAPY.

Diffusion is responsible for delivering oxygen to the wound’s surface.

In hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the entire body is subjected to supra-atmospheric pressure, and the patient is subjected to higher oxygen pressure through ventilation-thus, the increased oxygen pressure is given to the wound by perfusion in this procedure.

In this way, the systems of oxygen supply are fundamentally distinct from one another.

Because neither the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) nor private insurers compensate for this therapy, it has fallen into disuse.

Perry Hyperbaric Chamber with Two Places of Pressure This photograph depicts a Perry dual-place hyperbaric chamber from 1987.

Image Roger Huber is a co-founder of Incubators.

Protective Equipment from the 1940s It was necessary to wear a cap, mask, and gown before providing care for preterm children in the 1940s, and everybody who entered the Premature Station was subjected to this requirement.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

This photograph from the archives of OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois, taken in the 1940s, shows a preterm newborn in an incubator made by Clark.

The Clark Incubator was built in the 1940s.

Francis Hospital in Peoria, Illinois during the 1940s.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

This photo from the archives of OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois depicts a preterm newborn in a Davidson incubator from the 1950s, according to the hospital.

1949 A patent for a “Portable Infant Incubator” was awarded to J.L.

Pragel’s Portable Incubator from the 1950s This photograph depicts a Pragel portable incubator from the 1950s.

The inside of Pragel’s Portable Incubator in the 1950s.

Dennis Glover1951 Incubator and Nursery Equipment, image courtesy of Dennis Glover.

Francis Hospital in Peoria, Illinois, is seen in this 1951 photograph, which displays an incubator and a supply wagon.

Photograph courtesy of Joseph Witherspoon Bunn Baby’s Haven, about 1950 When the Inhalation Therapy journal published this advertisement for the Bunn Baby’s Haven in December 1959, it was a big deal.

1955 The Armstrong Incubator is a research and development facility.

The patent was granted on April 19, 1955, according to the U.S.

The Armstrong Incubator was built in the 1960s.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

Photograph from the archives of OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois, this image shows two incubators with their lids raised to allow staff access to the babies.

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in the 1960s The Neonatal Critical Care Unit of OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois in Peoria, Illinois, is seen in this 1960s photograph from the hospital’s archives.

Preliminary Examination of Premie Photo courtesy of the archives of OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois, which shows a doctor inspecting a premie in an incubator.

NICU in the 1960s An early neonatal intensive care unit room, complete with incubators, at OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois in Peoria, Illinois, may be seen in this shot from the 1960s.

Incubators were used for transportation in the 1960s.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

In this photo from the archives of OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois in Peoria, Illinois, taken in the early 1970s, a member of the Neonatal Center’s staff is shown monitoring the oxygen concentration in the Isolette, which is located in the Neonatal Center.

In an Isolette, you can keep track of your weight.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

OSF HealthCare Children’s Hospital of Illinois provided this image.

Ad for the Ohio Intensive Care Transport Incubator appeared in the December 1970 issue of INHALATION THERAPY, which was published in the United Kingdom.

Photograph courtesy of Trudy Watson 1995 Isolette In this photograph taken in 1995, a premie is seen in an Isolette incubator.

Do you have any images to share?

Cookies are used on this website to enhance your browsing experience. We’ll presume you’re okay with this, but you have the option to opt out if you so choose. Accepting cookie settingsACCEPTING cookie settings

McKesson Oxygen Tent: The Role of the Rubber Sheet

Using the Skip Nav to Get to Your Destination Reflections on Anesthesiology from the Wood Library-Museum|June 2018 Anesthesiology Vol. 128, No. 1192, June 2018. The principles that would later become the McKesson Oxygen Tent were being developed by Elmer Isaac “Ira” McKesson, M.D. (1881–1955), a physician-anesthesiologist who lived from 1881 to 1935. (above). A rubber sheet was put below the patient’s sheets and mattress cover in order to “block oxygen from going through the mattress and escaping from the tent,” according to the report.

  • The carbon-dioxide absorber was then refilled with soda lime and returned to the cabinet through a smaller door in certain hospital-model cabinetry.
  • McKesson assisted in deciding which of his several eponymous oxygenating inventions would be utilized to relieve his hard breathing.
  • McKesson died the following year.
  • Instructions for utilizing McKesson Oxygen Tents would be included in 1943 U.S.
  • (Source: The Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, copyrighted.) The principles that would later become the McKesson Oxygen Tent were being developed by Elmer Isaac “Ira” McKesson, M.D.
  • (above).
  • A big door in the cabinet led to an ice box that was totally packed with “cracked ice the size of a fist,” according to the author.
See also:  How To Clean Spray Tan Tent

While dying of cancer in 1935, Dr.

Dr.

Following McKesson’s death, his eponymous oxygen tents were rented to hospitals by the Ohio Chemical and Manufacturing Company, a former competitor of McKesson’s.

Army manuals, just a few years after Ohio’s advertising above was first published.

Bause, M.D., M.P.H., is Honorary Curator and Laureate of the History of Anesthesia at the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology in Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

His e-mail address is [email protected], and he can be reached at UJYC at AOL. The American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. retains ownership of the copyright for the year 2018. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. is a health information company. All Intellectual Property Rights are Reserved. 2018

Oxygen tent – All medical device manufacturers

  1. Anesthesia, resuscitation, and an oxygen tent are all available in the surgery unit.

This is an example of how to use the phrase “I’m sorry”: “I’m sorry.” Remove this product from consideration in the comparison tool If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected] or [phone number]. This product is comparable to others. Remove the item from the comparison tool • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • Intended for use in the treatment of respiratory issues by supplying a high concentration of moisture and oxygen in the atmosphere. Characteristics in terms of technology: – The format is trapezoidal.

  • This product is comparable to others.
  • Remove the item from the comparison tool.
  • The mask is equipped with a latex-free head strap made of elastic, which not only ensures a secure fit, but also helps to reduce skin irritation caused by traditional masks.
  • This product is comparable to others.
  • CAM4 full-body oxygen tent by GaleMed Corporation The outstanding CAM4 child/adult thermoelectric misttent from Allied instills a high degree of confidence in patients undergoing misttenttherapy.
  • This product is comparable to others.
  • This product is made entirely of medical-grade PVC material.

Patients might benefit from a soft and clear facetent.

Remove the item from the comparison tool Take a look at the other goods.

Facetentmask equipped with an oxygen adapter Color:Green Polyethylene (PE) for the fitting; PVC for the mask This product is comparable to others.

Thank you for signing up for our newsletter.

The email address entered is invalid.

Please see our Privacy Statement for more information on how MedicalExpo handles your personal information.

Contact the manufacturer to get a quote or a price |

View PDF catalogues and other online documentation * Prices are quoted before taxes.

They do not contain extra prices for installation or activation options, nor do they include delivery charges or customs fees. Prices are simply indicative and may vary from nation to country due to fluctuations in the cost of raw materials and currency rates. Up to ten goods can be compared.

Oxygen Tent for Animals

In this case, the answer is “no,” because there is no such thing as “no” in this case. Remove this product from consideration in the comparison tool. If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected] or [phone number protected]. This product is similar to another. Remove the item from the comparison tool’s list If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected]. . • Intended for use in the treatment of respiratory issues by creating an atmosphere with a high concentration of moisture and oxygen.

  1. Transparent acrylic is used in the construction of the structure.
  2. Remove the item from the comparison tool’s list This product is similar to another.
  3. This facetent is soft and lightweight, making it ideal for trauma victims to use.
  4. a two-meter-high concentration of oxygen This product is similar to another.
  5. CAM4 full-body oxygen tent by GaleMed Corporation.
  6. The use of thermoelectric cooling technology creates an optimum atmosphere for administering in the CAM4 computer.
  7. Remove the item from the comparison tool’s list the use of a mask with oxygen OM-81311 Component Part Number OM-81311 FacetentwithOxygen6mm connection This product is made entirely of medical-grade PVC.

Patients benefit from a soft and transparent facetent.

Remove the item from the comparison tool’s list Other goods are available to see.

Remove the item from the comparison tool’s list Become a member of our newsletter list.

Unfortunately, there was an issue with your request.

This area will be updated once a month by email.

4.0 out of 5 stars is the average (1 votes) When you search on MedicalExpo, you can: Find a local distributor or reseller|

Examine the product features and technical specifications of major brands |

a b c d e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e f g e Shipping and customs fees are not included, and there are no additional expenses for installation or activation choices included in the price.

Only illustrative, prices may vary from country to country depending on the cost of raw materials and the value of the dollar at the time of publication. a maximum of ten items can be selected for comparison

Size Dimensions Patient Size
S 10x8x8″ Small rabbit and pocket pet
M 20x13x14″ Average cat and small dog
L 31x21x24″ Maine coon and middle-sized dog

Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Oxygen Tents

Thorax, vol. 19, no. 6, 1964, pp. 568–570. Several other papers in PMC have mentioned this article in their own work.

Full text

There is a scanned copy of the original print version accessible with the full text. Obtain a printed copy (PDF file) of the whole article (423K), or click on one of the page images below to navigate through the article from page to page. Selected References are also linked to PubMed, if that is something you are interested in.

Selected References

These citations may be found in PubMed. This may not be an exhaustive list of all of the sources mentioned in this article.

  • BALL, J.A. (2001). The administration of oxygen. The Lancet, vol. 1, no. 7177, March 18, 1961, pages 591–593
  • CAMPBELL EJ. The relationship between oxygen concentrations in inspired air and arterial blood is known as respiratory failure. The Lancet, vol. 2, no. 7140, pp. 10–11, July 2, 1960. CATTERALL M. A novel mask for the delivery of oxygen or other gases is being developed. BMJ. 1960 Jun 25
  • 1 (5190):1941–1942
  • JAHN RE. 1960 Jun 25
  • An investigation of the amounts of oxygen and carbon dioxide in adult oxygen tents was conducted. MILLER WF. Oxygen treatment. Br J Anaesth. 1953 Jul
  • 25 (3):188–203
  • MILLER WF. Oxygen therapy. Catheter, mask, hood, and tent are all included. Anesthesiology, vol. 23, no. 4, july-august 1962, pp. 445–451.

Articles from Thorax are made available to you courtesy of the BMJ Publishing Group.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *