What Is A Tent Vestibule

What is a Tent Vestibule?

The Hilleberg Akto Side Vestibule provides enough of gear storage space while remaining out of the way of the tent’s entrance. Tent vestibules, which are similar to mudrooms, are located at the front of a tent or along the sides of it. If you’re in a crowded multi-person tent, they give extra room to store your stuff out of the way, or a spot to change out of wet, muddy gear before getting into the clean, dry end of your tent. During the winter, they may also be extremely helpful for getting out of the wind and cooking supper, provided that you take precautions to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning or putting your tent on fire.

Type of Tent Vestibules

Tent vestibules are classified into two categories: front vestibules and side vestibules. The majority of vestibules do not have a floor and rely on the construction of your tent to keep them upright.

Front vestibules

The front vestibules of a tent provide protection for the tent’s front entryway. Even though they’re often incorporated into the tent body, some tents feature add-on vestibules that you may carry along on journeys when inclement weather is forecast, like as in the winter. Front vestibules may be rather spacious, allowing you to keep a significant amount of equipment out of the elements. In situations when the interior of your shelter is limited or where you have big equipment that requires more rain protection, such as a bicycle, this is advantageous.

In this 2 person HMG Echo II tent, gear packed in the front vestibule makes it difficult for both occupants to enter and depart the tent.

Side tent vestibules

Side vestibules are often large enough to allow you to easily enter and exit your tent by keeping your belongings on one side of the vestibule and utilizing the other half as a door. Because of this, many one-person tents, such as the MSR Hubba NX Solo 1 and Gossamer Gear’s The One, include large side vestibules on the sides. There are two side vestibules on the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 that are broad enough to be used for both gear storage and doors. In a two-person tent, it’s preferable to have two entrances, such as theBig Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2or theREI Quarter Dome 2, each with its own vestibule for gear storage.

Doors on these tents are often angled in such a way that it is simple to go into and out of the side vestibules, even if they are stuffed with equipment.

Is a Tent Vestibule Necessary?

Some tents, such as the Black Diamond Firstlightand the Mountain Hardwear Direkt2, do not come with built-in vestibules, despite the fact that they are considered essential (although you can buyadd-on vestibulesfor both). On the other hand, consider the situation. Vestibules may significantly increase the livability of a tent while it is raining or snowing. However, whether you choose to purchase a tent with a vestibule or not is primarily determined by your willingness to handle the additional weight.

  1. The rain is very heavy in the United Kingdom, and hence having a tent vestibule is considered standard practice.
  2. In the United States, however, a tent vestibule is not normally required for less intense three-season camping and hiking activities in the summer.
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What is a Tent Vestibule? And Do You Need One? [

A Vestibule Is|Is It Necessary To Have One?|What Types Of Vestibules Are There?|Should You Have One?|Alternatives|Cooking|Pictures

What is a Tent Vestibule?

Tightly enclosed areas around the sides or front of your tent that give additional room just outside the inside of your tent but protected from the elements by a rain fly are known as tent vestibules. In order to save space, this is an excellent location to keep stuff outside the tent, to change out of muddy or damp clothing, to leave boots, or even to cook if campers are extremely cautious to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning or putting your tent on fire. Those seeking for a tent with a vestibule can check out our post on the finest budget hiking tents for the money.

Types of Tent Vestibules

Despite the fact that all tent vestibules are almost identical, the functioning and position of the vestibule vary slightly from one another. Some tents do not come with vestibules, and you will need to purchase one as an add-on. Additionally, campers can construct their own vestibules out of waterproof materials.

Front Vestibules

The vestibules of a tent are only found at the front and major entrances of the structure. Depending on the tent, they might be of varying sizes. While it is possible to enter and depart your tent by a single front vestibule with a single entrance, it can be a bit difficult to do so when you have goods stowed in the vestibule.

Side Vestibules

The tent has two side vestibules, one on each side of the structure. Two vestibules and two doors inside your tent are a wonderful feature to have in a camping tent. This doubles the vestibule area and allows you to load one vestibule with gear while using the other vestibule as an escape at the same time.

Add-On Tent Vestibules

In the tent, you will find side vestibules on both sides of the structure. To have two vestibules and two entrance entrances to your tent is a wonderful luxury. As a result, you have twice the vestibule space and may load one vestibule with gear while using the other vestibule as an escape.

Should You Have a Tent Vestibule?

A tent vestibule is absolutely not required, but they do come in useful on practically every occasion. This is especially true if you live in a region where there is a chance of precipitation. Having more storage space is wonderful for freeing up room within your tent while also keeping the interior clean and dry. The trade-off for having a vestibule is negligible in comparison. Because it adds fabric to your whole tent, your packed-down tent will be somewhat larger and heavier as a result of the addition of fabric.

When sharing a tent with another person, vestibules become even more important.

This excellent feature allows you to take off your wet boots outside of the tent while still remaining shielded from the weather.

We frequently sit down inside the tent with our boots just outside the zippers, unlace them, and then pop the boots off before squeezing fully inside the tent’s interior. As a result, dirt and mud are prevented from entering the tent.

Vestibule Alternatives

Campers may simply construct their own vestibules out of whatever waterproof material they want. If you want a waterproof room with sufficient ventilation, you may use any type of rainfly material, including tarps, to make one. Many people prefer to bring additional fabric to their campground in order to make it more comfortable and functional. By bringing a tarp, campers may cover any sections of their campsite that are not tied to their tent with a waterproof covering. A sitting space or a cooking area a short distance away from your tent might be a terrific addition to your camping experience.

Can You Cook Inside a Tent Vestibule?

The quick answer is yes, although extra caution should be exercised in this situation. Cooking inside your tent or vestibule is almost usually discouraged, and you will hear and read about it as well. Not only may you burn a hole in your tent, but the carbon monoxide emitted by camping stoves can cause death or illness in certain people. The most important thing to remember is to keep your space adequately ventilated. If the air is not moving through the system at a reasonable rate, you may be accumulating deadly quantities of carbon monoxide.

Bears are another factor to consider in this situation.

When camping in bear territory, it is strongly advised to cook a short distance away from your tent or campfire.

Please get in touch with us and let us know!

Additional Pictures

Vestibule on the Side Tent Vestibule Max DesMarais is a Canadian actor and director. HikingFishing was founded by Max DesMarais in 2007. He has a strong desire to be in the great outdoors and to share his experiences with others. Max is a published author who has written for a number of outdoor websites as well as digital marketing websites. More information about him may be found at: hikingandfishing/about.

What Is A Tent Vestibule? (And Do You Need One?)

Vestibule on each side of the tent Maxime DesMarais is a Canadian actor and filmmaker. HikingFishing was founded by Max DesMarais in 2008. The outdoors and sharing his experiences with others are two of his greatest passions. In addition to his writing for outdoor websites and digital marketing websites, Max is a published author. His biography may be found at: hikingandfishing/about.html

Types Of Tent Vestibules

Vestibule Tent Vestibule on the Side Max DesMarais is a Canadian actor. HikingFishing was founded by Max DesMarais. He has a strong desire to go outside and to share his experiences with others. Max has been published as an author on a number of outdoor websites as well as digital marketing websites. More information about him may be found at hikingandfishing/about.

Front Vestibules

The vestibule in the front is quite large. These vestibules are attached to the front entrance of the tent.

A variety of sizes are available, with some being big enough to keep substantial equipment away from the outdoors. Keeping your camping goods in a front vestibule, on the other hand, may make accessing and departing your tent more difficult, especially if your tent has just one entrance.

Side Vestibules

Two vestibules are included in the price of the tent. Side vestibules are located on either side of the tent’s perimeter. Some tents are equipped with or have the ability to accommodate two vestibules. This choice often gives more space and allows you to utilize one as extra storage space and the other as a door. It is also more cost effective.

Add-On Tent Vestibules

If your tent does not come with a vestibule, you may be able to purchase an add-on vestibule for a little additional fee. A range of kinds and combinations are available for these products. If your tent model does not have a tent vestibule add-on available, finding a universal tent vestibule add-on can be difficult. Additionally, they often do not fit directly onto your existing tent.Unfortunately, if your tent model does not have a tent vestibule add-on available, finding a universal tent vestibule add-on can be difficult, and they often do not fit directly onto your existing tent.

Should You Invest In A Tent Vestibule?

Tent vestibules are not strictly essential, but they are a wonderful addition to have on hand as an alternative. In particular, if you live in a region with a lot of precipitation or if you’re planning a long camping trip, you should be prepared. It is impossible to exaggerate the value of the additional room and convenience. Vestibules increase the weight and dimensions of a packed tent by a little amount. Having said that, the additional weight is generally little, making the investment in a vestibule a small tradeoff.

They are quite useful due to the increased storage and optimization of inside tent space that they provide.

DIY Tent Vestibule

It is rather simple to construct a DIY tent vestibule using only a few materials, some of which you may already have lying around the house. What you’ll need is the following:

  • A tarp or other water-resistant covering
  • Stakes
  • A rope or cord
  • And other materials

Vestibule for a Tent Constructed from a Poncho Tarp

Should My Tent Footprint Extend To My Vestibule?

First and foremost, it’s important to understand what a tent footprint is and what it’s intended to achieve. A tent footprint is a protective covering that is placed beneath your tent to assist minimize friction between the tent and the ground while you sleep. In essence, it helps to extend the life of your tent. However, it also aids in the reduction of condensation and the preservation of the warmth of your tent. Consequently, why would you want a tent footprint beneath your vestibule? Some campers like to extend their tent footprint into the vestibule area in order to reduce the likelihood of dampness, mud, and other external debris being tracked inside their tent during the camping trip.

You might also use a tarp or a mat to cover the area.

Can I Cook In My Tent Vestibule?

Cooking inside a vestibule or tent may be exceedingly risky, if not downright deadly. It is possible that you will burn a hole in your tent or suffer from carbon monoxide poisoning if you are outside. Although it is not recommended, you can cook within your vestibule if you take extreme caution.

The most important thing to remember is to make sure there is enough ventilation. If you’re camping in bear territory, it’s also a good idea to cook a little further away from your tent. The last thing you want on your camping trip is for a bear to decide to join you.

How Big Of A Vestibule Do I Need?

The amount of vestibule space you’ll want will be determined by what you intend to use it for and what you intend to store in it. For example, if you only want a tiny vestibule to store your shoes, you do not require a large vestibule space. You’ll need extra space, though, if you want to keep anything like a bicycle in your storage unit. If you’re going to be cooking in your tent during the winter, a bigger vestibule that extends further away from the tent is also advised. For each individual, we propose around 6 square feet of vestibule area on average.

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What Is A Tent Vestibule? What Does It Do?

Your vestibule size requirements will be determined by what you want to use it for and what you intend to store there. It is not necessary to have a large vestibule if all you want is a little entranceway for your shoes, for example. However, if you want to keep something large, such as a bicycle, you’ll need a lot more space. If you’ll be cooking in your tent during the winter, a bigger vestibule that extends further away from the tent is also advised. Our recommendation for vestibule space per person is around 6 square feet.

See also:  How To Waterproof A Tent With Spray

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What Does A Tent Vestibule Do?

Tent vestibules will provide you with a measure of protection from the elements when you are entering and exiting your tent. That implies that if it’s pouring outside, you may enter your tent’s vestibule and dry off before entering the main body of your tent, which would prevent you from tracking mud and water into your tent. They also give additional storage space for both you and your belongings. However, I would not advocate sleeping in the vestibule of your tent because they are often not as well protected from the elements as the remainder of the tent.

Do You Need A Tent Vestibule?

A tent vestibule is not required in this situation. Having one is more of a nice-to-have option for your tent than anything else. In terms of functionality, having a vestibule is comparable to putting an awning over your back patio. Though an awning over your back patio would be wonderful, is it actually required for you to enjoy your patio in the first place? No, not in the traditional sense. A vestibule will not be included with the majority of tents. In most cases, tent vestibules are featured on higher-end tents that have several amenities.

What Are The Benefits of A Tent Vestibule?

The biggest advantage of having a vestibule is that it allows you to remove your shoes before entering your tent, which is something I like. Who knows about you, but it annoys me to track dirt and leaves inside my tent and then have to clean it out afterwards! It is possible to remove your shoes inside of the vestibule of your tent, eliminating the need to worry about tracking all of that dirt into your tent. Cleaning up after your tent when it’s time to pack it up will be considerably simpler as a result of this.

When you are not using your cooler or cooking equipment, you may keep them in your vestibule instead of needing to store them inside your tent at night, which allows you to free up more space within your tent for your other camping gear.

Tent vestibules, as the name implies, are meant to keep you protected from the weather while yet allowing you to exit the main section of your tent.

If you put your cooler inside your tent, you won’t have to leave it except to go to the bathroom, saving you time and money.

Provided you were really in need of more sleeping space, you could even have someone sleep inside your vestibule on warmer nights if they weren’t bothered by the prospect of sleeping beneath the stars. Because they will be mostly covered by mesh, they will be protected from the outside world.

What Are The Downsides To Having A Tent Vestibule?

There aren’t many drawbacks to owning a tent with a vestibule, to be completely honest. The most significant disadvantage is that vestibules are often found on more feature-rich tents, which implies that the tent will typically be more expensive than a tent without a vestibule. While the price of a tent with a vestibule may vary based on the amenities you desire, you should be able to locate one that is equivalent in price to an instant or pop up tent. Because of the design of the tent, most cabin instant tents do not come with a vestibule as standard.

One thing to keep in mind is that you should not cook within your tent’s vestibule unless absolutely necessary.

Even if you leave the front of your tent vestibule open to allow for ventilation of your gas grill, you may be able to get away with cooking within your tent vestibule, but it’s best not to take any chances.

Are there tents with a side vestibule?

Although having a vestibule in a tent has its drawbacks, there aren’t many of them. On the negative, vestibules are typically found on more feature-rich tents, which means that the tent will typically cost more than a tent that does not have one. While the price of a tent with a vestibule may vary based on the amenities you choose, you should be able to locate one that is equivalent in price to an instant or pop up tent. Because of the design of the tent, most cabin quick tents do not include a vestibule.

Keep in mind that you should not cook within your tent’s vestibule, since this might cause fires.

Cooking within your tent vestibule may be possible if you leave the front of your tent vestibule open to allow the propane grill to vent, but it is recommended not to take any chances.

What is the best tent with a vestibule?

Four-person tent by Coleman (Carlsbad). A number of great new features have been added to this Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent in recent years, and I think it’s well worth your time to check it out. Inside, the tent is 9 feet by 7 feet, with a central height of 5 feet. The tent is available in a variety of colors. The screen room’s measurements are 9 feet by 4 feet, and it seats four people. With that being stated, this tent will be of a more standard size, and it should be able to accommodate 2-4 people comfortably.

  1. You should be able to squeeze a queen-size inflatable bed into the space and comfortably sleep two people.
  2. This tent, which uses dark room technology, prevents 97 percent of the sunlight from entering the tent, which would otherwise enter.
  3. Additionally, darkroom technology will keep the tent cooler in the summer months since it will allow less sunlight to enter the tent, allowing it to stay cooler than a comparable tent that does not have darkroom technology.
  4. This tent is also equipped with Coleman’s Weathertec system, which means it is built to withstand rain and wind conditions.

Check out the current Amazon pricing for this Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent if you’re interested in seeing what they’re now offering.

6-person tents

Tent for four people by Coleman A number of intriguing new features have been added to this Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent in recent years, and I think it’s well worth your time to investigate them. Approximately 9 by 7 feet in size on the inside of the tent, with a 5-foot central height, are the inside measurements of this tent. A 9-foot-by-4-foot screen room is available for rental. In light of the foregoing, this tent will be of a more standard size, and it should be able to accommodate 2-4 individuals.

  • The inflatable bed should be able to accommodate two persons comfortably in a queen size.
  • Thanks to dark room technology, this tent effectively blocks 97 percent of the natural light that would otherwise enter it.
  • Additionally, darkroom technology will keep the tent cooler in the summer months since it will allow less sunlight to enter the tent, allowing it to remain cooler than a comparable tent that does not have darkroom technology.
  • Additionally, this tent is equipped with Coleman’s Weathertec system, which means that it is built to withstand rain and wind conditions.
  • Check out the current Amazon pricing for this Coleman Carlsbad 4-person tent if you’re interested in seeing what they’re now running.

8-person tents

Evanston 8-Person Tent from Coleman This Coleman Evanston 8-person tent is one of the most popular tents with a screened area or vestibule, and it’s easy to see why. If you are looking for a tent that is on the bigger side, this tent will be able to accommodate two queen-size air beds or up to eight people sleeping on camping mats comfortably. Given its dimensions of 15 feet by 12 feet with a central height of 6 feet, this tent is on the big side. Aside from providing extra space for storage, the screen room also provides more space for entertaining guests.

  • Check out the current Amazon pricing of this Coleman Evanston tent if you’re curious in seeing how much it costs right now.
  • Inside, the tent measures 11 feet by 16 feet in total length and width.
  • Unfortunately, Amazon does not appear to have an image accessible for use, therefore I will not be able to add it in this section of the review.
  • With a central height of 6.5 feet, this tent should be suitable for those who are somewhat taller than average.
  • With its polyester fabric construction, it helps to protect your tent from the elements, and it comes with a partially covered rain fly to help keep water from getting inside your tent.

If you’re interested in seeing what the current Amazon pricing are for this Wenzel Klondike tent, you can do so by clicking here.

Related Questions

Is it better to have a huge vestibule or a little vestibule? In the event that you want to utilize your tent vestibule for storage and have a considerable amount of camping gear, you may want to consider purchasing a tent with a spacious vestibule. With a spacious vestibule, you will have more space to walk around and will be able to cover more ground to get in and out of your tent while still being protected from the weather. Is it possible to include a vestibule in your tent? It is true that you can purchase add-on vestibules for your tent, but I would recommend purchasing a tent that already includes one if you truly want one.

  • However, you may be able to purchase an add-on vestibule that would operate as a second rain fly, which would assist to avoid rain from coming inside your tent and ruining your camping experience.
  • If you are unfamiliar with the term “rain fly” or are interested in learning how to make your rain fly waterproof, you may want to read my post outlining what the primary function of rain flys is and how to make them as waterproof as possible.
  • If you’re planning on going hiking and require a backpacking tent with a vestibule, I’d recommend opting with the Coleman Hooligan backpacking tent, which has a vestibule and is lightweight.
  • The Coleman Hooligan tent is made of polyester and measures 9 feet by 7 feet on the outside.
  • The rainfly is a full-coverage rain fly that wraps around the front of the tent to provide additional protection.
  • It also has a waterproof floor, which is an added bonus.
  • What is the most effective method of waterproofing my tent?

What Is A Tent Vestibule Used For

Should a huge vestibule be chosen instead? In the event that you want to utilize your tent vestibule for storage and have a significant amount of camping gear, you may want to consider purchasing a tent with a larger vestibule. If your tent has a spacious vestibule, you will have more space to move around and will be able to go in and out of your tent more easily while still being protected from the weather. Does your tent have the option of adding a vestibule? A vestibule may be purchased separately for your tent, however if you absolutely want a vestibule I recommend purchasing a tent that has one.

  1. However, you may be able to purchase an add-on vestibule that would operate as a second rain fly, which would assist to avoid rain from coming inside your tent and ruining your camping trip.
  2. If you don’t know what a rain fly is or are interested in learning how to make your rain fly waterproof, you may want to read my post outlining what the main purpose of rain flys is and how to make them as waterproof as possible before continuing on.
  3. A 4-person tent, the Coleman Hooligan tent is 9 by 7 feet on the inside, and it has a carrying capacity of 50 pounds.
  4. An all-encompassing rain covering that wraps around the front of the tent is known as a rainfly.
  5. It also has a waterproof floor, which is a nice addition.
  6. When it comes to waterproofing my tent, what is the best method?

If you’re interested in understanding the best methods for waterproofing a tent, I’ve created an essay on the subject that outlines the best methods for making your tent waterproof as well as which tents provide the greatest waterproof technology.

First, what is a tent vestibule?

When it comes to tents, the vestibule is a covered compartment that does not function as a part of the sleeping area. Consequently, according to this definition, they all fall into one of the two categories listed below:

  • When it comes to tents, a vestibule is a covered compartment that does not function as a part of the sleeping area. Consequently, according to this definition, they all fall into one of the two categories described below.

It is possible to acquire supplementary vestibules separately, which will provide you with an additional enclosed place for your belongings. That is why you will hear the termgear shed used sometimes, only to familiarize yourself with the phrase in case you come across something similar in the future. Big Agnes Big House Vestibules are an example of this style of structure. They have a variety of sizes available, as you can see by clicking the link. The Huba Huba NX Gear Shed is yet another excellent example that can be seen on the website.

For want of a better phrase, I’ll refer to the second group as tentfly vestibules.

As a result, I’ll say a few words about this kind because it is more commonly seen.

Tent fly vestibules

If you check at the mytents website, you will note that virtually all of them have a vestibule, however there are some outliers. I may have overlooked some varieties, but all of the tents listed here are classified into one of the following categories:

  1. Tents that do not have vestibules
  2. Tents having one or more side door(s) and one or more side vestibule(s)
  3. Tents having one or more side doors as well as a vestibule at the front
  4. Temporary structures that have a front entrance as well as a corresponding front vestibule
  5. Tents with a front door as well as side vestibules are available. Tents with a certain design, with a tarp that serves as a vestibule or an awning
  6. Tents with a specific size and shape
  7. Tents that have a vestibule with two zippers that can be transformed into an awning
  8. Tents with a vestibule that can be transformed into an awning
See also:  How Big Grow Tent For 4 Plants

There are no likely some further sub-types that may be discovered, but the ones listed here should cover all that I have studied on this site.

1. Tents without vestibules

There are no likely some further sub-types that may be discovered, but the ones listed here should cover all that I have studied on this site to this point.

2. Tents with side doors and side vestibules

The term’side’ should be interpreted to refer to the side of the tent that is longer. A large number of the tents on the campsite are of this design. Because there is more space on the side for a large door, this is an excellent design choice for a bathroom. As a result, you get a vestibule that covers the area in front of the entrance door. There are two options: you may have it on one side (like in the Kelty Salida 1 and Salida 2tents) or on both sides (see theMountainsmith Morrison 2 tent).

3. Tents with side door(s) and with front vestibule

The term “front” refers to the shorter side of the tent in this context. Consequently, the door is on the longer side, while the vestibule is on the shorter side. Sierra Designs Tensegritytents provide an intriguing design that you can see in person. Side door and front vestibule of the Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 are shown in this photo.

4. Tents with front doors and corresponding front vestibule.

This design is common in single tents; for example, the Big Agnes Fly Creek Platinum 1 is an example. Also available in tents with one entrance for two people, such as those from the same series as Platinum 2. For a tent for two people with a single door, it is preferable to have a front door rather than a side door so that both occupants are in an equal position in relation to the single door.

5. Tents with front doors and side vestibules

This is a fascinating design, as seen by the Sierra Designs Lightning 2 FL tent, which has this characteristic. The vestibules serve only as storage places for equipment, and the front entrance is only partially covered by a modest awning to provide protection from the elements. As previously said, this is a fantastic alternative because all of the area beneath the vestibule(s) is dedicated to gear storage.

In contrast, when the vestibule is located in front of the door, you can only utilize a portion of the area for stuff, leaving the remaining space available for getting in and out of the tent. As you can see in the video, the vestibules are accessible both from the outside and from the inside:

6. Tents with a particular design, with tarps which serve as vestibules

When combined with a tarp of any kind, every tent from the first group above falls under this category. Some tents, on the other hand, are designed to be used with tarps as vestibules (or awnings). In this case, the Kelty Rover tent stated above is included; the Rover Tarp, which may be bought separately and used in conjunction with the tent, is also included. Another example is the Kelty TN2 tent, which includes a specific buckle that allows you to attach the Kelty Upslope Tarp to the tent’s floor.

The Kelty Mirada tent with a tarp is the greatest example of this style of tent.

7. Tents with a vestibule that has two zippers which allow it to transform into an awning

This might be any of the tents that have a vestibule in front of the entrance door to the event. Two zippers provide considerable adaptability in general, and in particular, when it comes to constructing an awning. This is demonstrated perfectly by the Kelty Horizon 2 tent, which serves as an excellent example. Aspects of the Kelty Horizon 2 tent that stand out include the front entrance and front vestibule, which can be converted into an awning. There are various reasons why this particular tent is unique.

Please visit the following website for further information.

Should you really use a vestibule?

In the case of the tent fly vestibules, you don’t have an option but to use what is provided. It is an integral element of the fly, and it cannot be separated from it. However, if you believe you will not require one, look for a tent that does not include a vestibule. It should be noted that finding any will be difficult. What you do with the supplementary vestibules is entirely up to you and depends on the scenario. If you camp in a location with easy access by automobile, having such a feature can make it much easier to plan your life while you’re there.

Conclusion

So that’s all I had to say about what a tent vestibule is used for. I hope you found it useful. As you can see, it serves a variety of functions:

  • It takes up a little amount of space above the entrance and provides some protection from the weather. It gives a place for you to keep your belongings
  • A lovely awning for sitting in front of the tent is included in some innovative designs, which adds to the comfort of the experience.

I hope you have found this text to be helpful. Using the comment box below, please let me know if you believe that a certain tent and vestibule design should be included in this collection. I hope you have a wonderful day.

10 Best Tents With Vestibules 2022

There are many different kinds of tent accessories available. A tent vestibule is a feature that is particularly useful in a tent. A tent vestibule is a covered section that runs along the front or sides of a tent’s perimeter. It gives additional room outside of the tent’s walls, yet it is protected from the elements by a rain fly. This provides a camper with additional room that is outside of their tent but still within it, which is useful for a variety of uses. This additional area allows you to keep dirty boots or garments outside your tent, store other items outside so it does not take up valuable tent space, and even cook outside your tent, which is much safer than cooking inside your tent.

In other words, having a vestibule is similar to having a tiny porch for your tent on a warm day.

Do You Need a Vestibule?

It is possible to get many different kinds of tent accessories. A tent vestibule is a feature that is particularly significant. Generally speaking, a tent vestibule is a sheltered space that runs along the front or sides of the tent. Outside the tent walls, but covered by a rain fly, it gives additional room for sleeping and lounging. Having extra room outside of their tent while still being a part of it may be really beneficial for a variety of reasons. This additional area allows you to keep dirty boots or garments outside your tent, store other items outside so it does not take up valuable tent space, and even prepare food outside your tent, which is much safer than cooking inside your tent.

Top 10 Tents With Vestibules 2022

After discussing what tent vestibules are and why you should consider purchasing one before going camping, let’s have a look at some of the best tents with vestibules on the market.

Ayamaya Pop Up Tent with Vestibule

The Ayamaya Pop Up Tent is distinguished by a number of unique characteristics. As a result, it can accommodate up to 6 people, making it a very large tent with ample floor area and a central height of more than 4 feet in height. The vestibule design gives plenty of space for all kinds of storage, allowing even a pet to sleep comfortably in the space. There is an electrical cord access port, which allows you to connect a power cable to an external power source. This dome tent is equipped with storage compartments and a lantern hook to help you keep things organized while you’re camping.

  • Camping in both warm and cold weather is made possible by this feature, which permits temperature adjustment.
  • It includes two huge doors with hooded vents on the back, as well as four zippered windows on the front.
  • The use of double-sided zippers is normal, and the entire construction is water-resistant as well.
  • If you compare the Coleman Cabin Camping Tent to other tents meant to accommodate four people, it includes an enclosed screen porch that effectively increases the amount of room.
  • The cabin type tent has a retractable rainfly as well as a tub-shaped floor to accommodate your camping needs.
  • The sturdy construction of this structure allows the tent to withstand winds of up to 35 miles per hour.
  • floor area (sufficient for a stove jack), it is large enough to accommodate a queen-sized air mattress and allow campers of average height to stand straight up inside of it.

However, few cabin tents are as roomy as this one, which features a wide front vestibule, making it a more expensive option in comparison to other options.

It is a significantly more affordable alternative that provides ample space for two individuals to sleep.

It’s simple to put up owing to the color-coded aluminum poles and clip system that make it possible.

You may still bring your sleeping bag without having to worry about adding any more weight to your luggage.

If you’re camping in the woods and have to do a lot of trekking on your own or with children, the total weight is just around six pounds, making it quite light and easy to transport.

It is equipped with gear loft loops, color-coded clips, fly attachments, and folding poles in order to do this.

The tent comes with a roll-top cube carry case, and it is self-supporting and free-standing as well.

However, there is still more than enough space for two persons in this room.

There is just one door in the vehicle.

Its most notable feature is that it is extremely lightweight, making it simple to transport when trekking or traveling in remote locations.

Because it is a pop-up tent, just a minimal amount of building is necessary to set it up and tear it down.

Even though it contains what appears to be a vestibule, in reality it is more of an extended roof.

The vestibule tent has a UPF 50+ certification, which means it provides excellent sun protection.

It should be noted that this tent is not suited for use in heavy rain or in extremely cold conditions.

According to the manufacturer, it isn’t the ideal choice when it comes to tents meant for heavy-duty trekking and camping.

Of course, this also implies that the amount of room available in each tent is determined by the size of the tent that you get from the manufacturer.

The three-person tent has a maximum height of 4.8 feet and a floor size of eight by seven feet, making it suitable for a variety of activities.

To keep things toasty, it includes a whole mesh interior as well as a fully enclosed rainfly.

Waterproof flooring, wind-resistant frames and zipper protection are some of the features of this structure.

In addition, there are storage compartments for storing valuable items.

It has only one door and is quite simple to put together.

The most remarkable feature is the enormous vestibule it has – in fact, it takes up over half of the tent’s floor space, giving campers with a spacious front porch.

It is made of a breathable micromesh that is meant to keep you safe while still allowing air to pass through, boosting your capacity to breathe.

It’s a large, tough, and comfortable tent that can accommodate five people.

It is expensive, but it has many features that make the cost justified.

It is self-supporting and simple to assemble, thanks to two sturdy aluminum poles.

A gear loft, storage pockets as well as guy ropes and stakes are included, as well as two doors on one side of the tent.

Despite the fact that it’s not as light as a hammock, it’s a reasonably durable and rugged tent that is still lightweight.

Despite the fact that it can accommodate three people, there’s no denying that it would be a fairly tight fit.

It’s also UV and water resistant, which means it can withstand exposure to snow and rain.

As a result of how the layers are combined, excellent ventilation is provided in both warm and cold temperatures.

The fact that this two-person tent is so compact is perhaps the most notable feature of it.

Because it is lightweight and compact, it can be easily transported in a backpack by one person, making it an excellent choice for backpacking or hiking.

It’s also one of the lightest tents on the list, weighing in at just over three pounds and standing approximately three feet tall.

The vestibules are small, but they are also color-coded, which makes it easier to set them up correctly in the first place.

A rainfly is included, and its pole geometry has been specifically designed to maximize headroom for the sole occupant.

This one-person tent is equipped with glow-in-the-dark zippers, which make it easier to enter and exit the tent at night.

If you’re concerned about weight, you won’t find a more lightweight option than this.

Vestibules for Tents Come in a Variety of Designs On the surface, most vestibules perform the same functions; the only difference is where they are located and whether or not they are included with the tent in the first place.

Nonetheless, there is enough of a distinction that we will briefly discuss each of these types.

  • Vestibules in the front of the tent – These vestibules are positioned at the entrance to your tent’s front door. The size of the vestibule varies from tent to tent and there is no standard size that must be met. When it comes to some tents, the front vestibules are the only ones you have, which is a disadvantage. When the vestibule is congested, it might be difficult to get into and out of the tent, which can be frustrating. Both sides of the tent include vestibules, which are located on either side of the tent. Some tents feature two vestibules, which provides you with more storage space. It also means that they aren’t usually in front of your door, which is good news. Vestibules that can be purchased separately – Some tents do not come with vestibules, but they do offer add-on vestibules that can be purchased separately and attached to the tent. Once they are joined, they work in the same way as any other vestibule. In terms of whether they may be included, it is dependent on the tent
See also:  How To Fold Up Playhut Tent

What Is a Camping Tent\’s Vestibule? (Find the Answer Here)

Considering that many tents on the market are equipped with one or more vestibules, I believe it is a good idea to have the word “camping tent’s vestibule” stated in one location for convenience. As a result, please continue reading. In a nutshell, the vestibule of a camping tent is an extension of the tent that is sheltered from the elements. Typically, a vestibule is a component of the tent’s shell or tent’s fly, although it may also be an independent structure. The following are the reasons why I distinguish between the tent’s shell and its fly.

Some tents, on the other hand, include an interior canopy as well as a fly as a second layer of protection.

Some tents are also equipped with a detachable vestibule, however this is an unusual feature.

It is possible to get cabin tents with a full-coverage fly, although these tents are typically without a vestibule; an example of this kind is the Coleman Octagon 98 Full Fly Tent, which is seen above.

What is the purpose of a tent vestibule?

  • Because the area beneath a vestibule is shielded from the elements, it is a convenient storage spot where you may store your boots and camping goods. Consider the fact that some tents feature a vestibule with a detachable floor, which provides even another layer of protection, this time against groundwater. As a result, when you keep your belongings beneath a vestibule, they will not become soaked and filthy from the ground. A vestibule can also be used for culinary purposes. I understand that some people are opposed to cooking in a tent in general, but when you are faced with hours or even days of continuous rain, you don’t have much of a choice. In a tent or beneath a vestibule, you may safely prepare food. For additional information, see my separate book. It is possible to simply roll out a section of the vestibule in the area where you cook if the vestibule is flooring. You will be shielded from flying insects by a vestibule with a zipper closure. Even though the carpeted vestibule may appear to be an additional room, you are not protected from crawling insects and snakes in this setting. Therefore, the vestibule of a tent is not a sleeping area
  • Some vestibules are tall and spacious, with plenty of space for sitting. For you to understand what I’m talking about, simply look at this. The North Face Wawona 6 Tent (pictured below) or the North Face Kaiju 6 Tent are also excellent options. The Wawona 6 Tent by The North Face
  • Having a vestibule ensures that the inner entrance is completely protected. As a result, if an inner door includes mesh portions covered by zippered panels, you may leave the mesh sections in place all of the time, increasing ventilation. Occasionally, such inner doors are just made of mesh, which is OK because they are located deep beneath the vestibule, where excellent ventilation is ensured. In certain cases, a vestibule is equipped with multiple zippers, allowing you to form an awning. The awning may be supported by a pair of poles that are supplied, or you can use your trekking poles to support the structure. Check out how it appears in thisMarmot Guest House 6-Person Tent, and keep in mind that this particular tent includes no fewer than three vestibules:

Tent for six people at Marmot Guest House.

Disadvantages of having a vestibule

A vestibule increases the amount of covered area available in a tent, and having such an addition is usually beneficial; nevertheless, it should be noted that a vestibule makes a tent non-freestanding. In other words, the inner tent can be completely independent, but when you put the fly on, you must anchor the vestibule flaps in order to have a practical entry and storage room for your belongings. As a result, there is a certain amount of trade-off. Many tent manufacturers that construct tents with vestibules refer to their products as “freestanding,” however this is not necessarily the case due to the factors described above.

  • As an illustration, consider this well-constructed REI Base Camp 6 Tent: The Base Camp 6 Tent from REI.
  • This may be inconvenient.
  • Overall, having a camping tent with a vestibule may be beneficial if you want additional storage space for your goods.
  • If you are on a cross-country journey and do not have any gear or want to keep it in the car, you can choose a tent that does not have a vestibule.

You might also be interested in reading my text on the subject of single wall tent versus double wall tent. Thank you for taking the time to read this. In the event that you have any questions or comments, please let me know by using the comment box provided below. Wishing you a pleasant day.

What Is a Tent Vestibule and Why Do You Need It?

Camping has been increasing in popularity for quite some time. Most likely because an increasing number of individuals are attempting to break away from their hectic city lives and appreciate nature. A large part of this is made possible by new and improved camping equipment, which makes camping more accessible to even the most reluctant campers today. Today, we’ll speak about tent vestibules, which may or may not be a feature that you missed from your old camping tent, but which is surely something to consider.

Let’s have a look and see.

What is a tent vestibule?

It is a covered compartment located immediately outside your main tent canopy, either on the side or at the front of your tent. You may use it in the same way you would your vehicle porch outside your front door, where you can store your shoes, camping gear, and other filthy items that you don’t want to bring inside your main tent with you. You may also utilize the vestibule area to prepare food and rest on a chair while doing so. In your tent, the vestibule allows you to take advantage of your surroundings without feeling imprisoned within your tent or experiencing the brunt of poor weather.

The sunglasses keep you safe from the hot sun and unexpected rains, while the open front let you to take in the breathtaking scenery of entrancing campgrounds.

What are the benefits of vestibules?

Vestibules are great for taking in the scenery and taking in the weather, but that’s not all they’re excellent for. There are a number of other advantages that make the vestibule well worth the investment.

Mud Room

Keeping your tent clean when camping in the woods is nearly hard (and tents are famously tough to wash). When you go climbing, trekking or even just fetching water, you frequently return with your shoes coated in mud or snow and your raincoat soaked in damp dirt. And entering the tent in this manner is not only disgusting, but it is also quite unsanitary. However, you cannot leave your belongings outside in the rain to be soaked. This is one of the reasons why tent vestibules are so useful. This partially covered area not only serves as a storage area for your muddy belongings, but it also serves as a changing room where you can remove your top layers and get all washed up before entering the tent.

Weather Protection

Votives are manufactured from the intrinsic material of the tent, which in most cases is waterproof. When it rains, opening your tent means letting the water to accumulate inside the tent, which is not a good thing. However, with a vestibule, whether it is light rains, snowfall, or strong gusts, your vestibule is a secure haven where you can put up your chairs, sit, and enjoy the weather without being adversely impacted.

Storage Area

The task of creating room and arranging belongings in a 1-2, 3- or 4-person tent is quite challenging. What I’m getting at is how can one set up a sleeping bed, a travel gear, clothes, and dinnerware in a single tent. Even if you do wind up modifying things, you’ll quickly begin to feel claustrophobic because there will be little room to walk around in the room. Fortunately, vestibules may be of considerable assistance in this situation. Because, when it comes to camping, having extra room is always beneficial.

You may also use this compartment to store your tiny generator if you are camping with one, which is very useful if you are camping on a wet night. Though there may be some generator noise, the area will be protected from rain and snow.

Cooking space

We are all aware of the risks of cooking inside a tent, and we have discussed them. How do you cook if it’s too chilly and windy outside to do so, too? Vestibules are not only covered, but they are also properly ventilated. And it is for this reason that they are ideal for outdoor cooking. In order to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning, which is one of the most feared consequences of indoor cooking and is thus impossible in this situation In this case, you may quickly start your propane burner and prepare your meal.

Types of tent vestibules

There are many different styles, forms, and sizes of vestibules to choose from. However, the most often seen ones are given below.

Front vestibule

The front vestibules of a tent are the ones that are located directly in front of the tent’s entrance door. Although the size of these vestibules varies depending on the tent model, they are the most typically utilized vestibules for solitary camping excursions. These vestibules are mostly used for cooking and sitting, rather than storing things like clothes. Because when you store items at the front door, the accessories make it harder to exit and enter the building.

Side vestibule

Side vestibules are chosen by group campers since they not only give greater room, but they also provide for easier access to the door. The side of these vestibule tents refers to the side of the tent that is longer than the other side. These styles of vestibule tents include two entrances and vestibules, one for entering the tent and the other for storing belongings when you leave it. This is, without a doubt, more spacious, but it may be a touch too large for a lone camper.

Zipper Awning

Those with awnings or porches are the most fantastic form of vestibules since they not only give space for storage, but they also provide a place to rest and relax under an awning or porch. Because the awning is longer than the other two forms of vestibules, they provide significantly more space than the other two types of vestibules. The fact that the awning has a zipper and that it can be zipped back into the tent provides a vestibule where you can store your belongings is another advantage of this design.

Are vestibule tents more expensive than regular tents?

Yes. Vestibules do increase the price of a tent, though. The cost of a tough tent with vestibules varies greatly depending on its features. Those are definitely quite expensive, but there are also some that are reasonably priced and of great quality. ALPS Mountaineering – Taurus 4 Person tent and Coleman Sun Dome Tent are two of my favorite vestibule tents in terms of price. Both are available at REI. Both of these tents are high-end three-season models that are quite inexpensive when compared to other vestibule tents.

The vestibule design on the Taurus 4 Person tent is a large side vestibule with two entryways, but the front vestibule design on Coleman’s robust sun dome is a front entrance design.

Can I buy a vestibule separately?

You will not be able to purchase a vestibule separately since each tent type has a unique design for the vestibule. However, because a vestibule is not a requirement, some tent manufacturers provide vestibules as an optional tent addition, which may be purchased separately. These vestibules are simple to connect and detach, and they are really useful when using the tent. The Eureka – Add On Vestibule Mini Room tent is the greatest example of one of these tents.

Can I make my own tent vestibule?

Yes! Making a tent vestibule on your own is a wonderful concept, and one that I recommend to everyone. It takes no more than 5-7 minutes to build your own vestibule in the size that you want. To build a vestibule, you’ll need a waterproof tarp with eyelets (6-8 or 8-10), a packet of pegs, a coil of strong wax chain, and a mallet to complete the project.

  • Begin by cleaning the rear of the vestibule. To begin, drive the tent’s rear pegs into the earth on either side of the structure. Place it approximately one-quarter of the way along the tent’s length
  • Afterwards, start with one end of the tarp and weave the rope through it from one corner to the other
  • Lie the tarp over the tent and fasten the backside of the tarpaulin with the back pegs on each side, starting with the chord corner. Once the rear ends are fastened, grab two additional pegs and drive them into the ground to complete the installation. Remember to take into consideration the size of the tarp while fixing the front-end pegs. Afterwards, thread the cord through the front eyelets and fasten the front ends of the string to the pegs.

And that’s how you may quickly and easily create your tent vestibule.

Conclusion – Do you need a vestibule?

A vestibule is certainly not required, but having one makes life a little easier in a lot of situations. And, after all, isn’t camping all about being in nature, being comfortable, and being alone? Yes, you are correct. When it comes to camping equipment, vestibules and awnings are among the most useful, as they make the experience somewhat more pleasant and much less stressful. In other words, even if you can’t buy one, you should put one together to make the most of your vacation. Camping equipment that is recommended: I’ve created a list of all of my favorite camping gear in one convenient location.

Check them out on my website dedicated to recommended camping gear.

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