The Tent Life Nj Where Refugees

Music and Cookouts in a Tent City for Afghans Starting Life in the U.S.

Liberty Village is the name given to a tent city that sprouted virtually overnight to have a population that exceeds that of half of the municipalities in the state of New Jersey. It covers a vast area at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, a military post in central New Jersey where around 8,500 Afghans who have been displaced by the longest war in American history are currently residing for a short time. Hundreds of thousands of Afghans who fled Kabul in a mad dash last month are being housed at eight military bases in the United States while health and security inspections are completed and vaccinations against different illnesses take effect.

The new immigrants will eventually be relocated to communities around the country as part of one of the greatest resettlement projects in the United States in many decades.

For the time being, the most of them are content to merely await the next stage in their voyage.

Mr.

According to a military assessment, some refugees may remain on the base and in limbo for up to a year, depending on factors such as the predicted rise in wastewater and generator consumption, as well as the impact of the population spike on a vulnerable bat species that dwells in the vicinity.

  • Greetings from your new home Jersey City, a non-profit resettlement service, has put up temporary housing in a church rectory and is preparing to relocate a family of six into a three-bedroom apartment the first week of September.
  • Mr.
  • “This trickle of need,” he said, “is going to start turning into a constant stream of need.” The enormous military facility southeast of Trenton has a long history of assisting people in need.
  • There were no obvious evidence that a big relocation operation was happening next door, according to Scott Timberman, the mayor of Wrightstown, a small hamlet at one end of the base, which extends for 20 miles from west to east.
  • Timberman said of the newcomers to the base.
  • Featured image courtesy of Bryan Anselm for The New York Times The town hall is a place where people come to talk about their lives.
  • The mayor and deputy mayor are appointed to each hamlet, according to Mr.

Special Forces in southern Afghanistan, and that he is proficient in the Pashto language.

who played songs in English, Dari, and Pashto.

“It’s part of our overall morale-boosting program,” Mr.

“Put on some music.

However, employees from a number of nongovernmental organizations have been there on a daily basis.

Philip D.

According to visitors, children spend their free time playing soccer or volleyball and doing crafts.

One tent is used as a mosque, with distinct parts for men and women to pray in different areas.

Menendez noticed a strong sense of thankfulness in the air.

Murphy’s assistant, three resettlement groups would be in charge of collaborating with smaller community organizations to locate permanent homes in New Jersey for around 535 refugees.

Interfaith RISEin Highland Park andChurch World Service in Jersey City will also aid to relocate the freshly arriving Afghans.

Anintake formcreated to manage the overwhelming level of interest expressed by would-be volunteers says that donations to the base are “at capacity” and that no more can be accepted.

Mr.

Gift cards that can be used to buy cigarettes on the base are coveted, he added, because many of the men there now are addicted to nicotine.

“We can’t do this alone,” Ms.

“We really need community support.” ImageCredit.

1 stormflooded the region — is steep.

Christian Bollwage, the mayor of Elizabeth, a large and diverse city where the International Rescue Committee has offices,asked the groupnot to resettle Afghans there because officials were still seeking housing for 400 residents who had to evacuate afterHurricane Idahit.

Bollwagewrote on Twitter, “now is not the best choice.” Liesa Watson and her husband, Nader Rezai, own a two-family rental property near Journal Square in Jersey City.

Watson heard about the Afghans arriving at the military base, she told Welcome Home that she had a three-bedroom unit available and would be willing to lease it at slightly less than market rate.

“I see something I can do something about,” she said.

They arrived in the United States on Aug.

He is a banker who said he had worked indirectly with U.S. agencies; his wife is a schoolteacher. They are eager, he said, to get the clearance they need to start looking for permanent work. “There will clearly be open doors for many of these newcomers,” Mr. Menendez said.

Sandy refugees say life in tent city feels like prison

OCEANPORT, New Jersey (Reuters) – The town of Oceanport, New Jersey, is a popular tourist destination. Even in the tent city in Oceanport, New Jersey, it’s difficult to get any sleep at night. Superstorm Sandy refugees have been camped out in this muddy camp since Wednesday. It stands out among the Mercedes Benz stores and country clubs in this town near the state’s damaged coastline area, which is a huge oddity. A peek around Ashley Sabol’s lodgings at Tent City at Monmouth Park in Oceanport, New Jersey, where she is 21 years old and from Seaside Heights, New Jersey.

  • Michelle Conlin for Reuters The gigantic klieg lights that hang from the ceilings of the giant billowy white tents beam down on everyone all night long.
  • There is a lockdown in place at the post-storm housing, which is a refugee camp on the grounds of the Monmouth Park racecourse, with security guards at every entrance, even those to the showers.
  • Even to use the restroom, “you have to present your badge,” explained Amber Decamp, a 22-year-old whose Seaside Heights, New Jersey, rental was washed away.
  • Friday night, in front of the mess hall, which was offering fried chicken and ready-to-eat potatoes (just add water), a young child was dancing and dancing – to nothing.
  • “However, we don’t have somewhere else to go.” It represents the situation left by Hurricane Sandy, which includes tens of thousands of individuals who have no place to call home.
  • They are the people that just plan to stay for a brief period of time.
  • Furthermore, they provide a significantly more demanding problem.

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School Professor Susan Wachter explained that while inventory exists in other regions of the country, it is lacking in her home state.

Many, though, claim that they have no other choice in the near future.

“With winter on the horizon, it’s clear that they can’t stay there.” The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) intends to transport trailers into New Jersey in order to improve the availability of temporary housing.

On Saturday morning, inquiries to the state’s Department of Human Services requesting comment were not returned immediately.

The authorities in the region simply do not have access to enough alternative accommodation or hotel rooms to accommodate the large number of people who have been forced to flee their homes.

And all of the issues that this causes are on show here, where evacuees claim that life has been much worse than it was during the hurricane.

BLANKETS AND PARKAS

One of the reasons is a lack of information. On Friday, news was seeping outside of the heavily guarded hamlet that the Department of Human Services planned to relocate people to the racing clubhouse on Saturday. Photographs of individuals huddled under blankets and parkas inside the tents went viral in the media after they were shared on social media. However, no one inside the tent city, which has space for thousands of people but was only housing a few hundred on Friday, had heard anything about a relocation – or about anything else for that matter.

  • Sabol, who is unemployed and whose rental house was destroyed by the hurricane, recalls being awakened up on Wednesday morning at the shelter she was living in at Toms River High School, where she had been staying since the hurricane hit.
  • Sabol had half an hour to pack before the ship arrived.
  • Worse still, the Nor’easter snow storm that has been pounding the East Coast this week was increasing strength and whipping the bus with wind and rain.
  • The passengers were anticipating a hotel with air conditioning and perhaps even a restaurant.
  • They were provided with sheets, a rubbery cushion, a cot, and one blanket on the inside.
  • When the wind picked up speed, snow and slush flew into Sabol’s face because her cot was close to the open tent flaps.
  • Her hands began to turn purple.
  • Power workers from out of state who are assisting utilities in restoring electricity to the region were also beginning to set up camp in the tent city at the time.
  • As a result, there were significantly more males than women or children, and the ladies claimed it was hard not to notice the leering of some of the guys.
  • Skorupski is accustomed to living in his suburban home.

“The only thing that could be worse than this is sleeping in your truck,” he explained. Martin Howell and Vicki Allenfore did the editing. -phone -onlyfor-tablet-portrait-upfor-tablet-landscape-upfor-desktop-upfor-wide-desktop-up

The ‘Tent City’ in NJ Where Refugees from Afghanistan Wait to Start a New Life

A contributing factor is the absence of information. On Friday, news was flowing outside the heavily guarded hamlet that the Department of Human Services planned to relocate inhabitants to the racing clubhouse on Saturday, according to reports. Photographs of individuals huddled under blankets and parkas inside the tents went viral in the media after they were posted on social media sites. Although there is space for thousands of people in the tent city, it was only housing a few hundred people on Friday.

  • As Ashley Sabol, 21, of Seaside Heights, New Jersey, puts it: “They treat us like we’re captives.” The feeling we have is that we are in a concentration camp, which is terrible to say.
  • Sabol said that the conditions were “really rather good.” Everybody would be transferred to motels in Wildwood, New Jersey, where they would be able to reacquaint themselves with baths, mattresses, and the presence of a door.
  • About 50 other passengers joined Sabol on a New Jersey Transit bus that cruised about aimlessly for hours, seemingly with no destination in mind.
  • It took the bus driver four hours to arrive to a gravel parking lot.
  • What they saw instead was a mini-city of portable toilets and a sea of white tents, their flaps breaking in the wind.
  • This particular night, there was no heat, and when temperatures plummeted below freezing, people could see their breath.
  • She felt a shudder run down her spine.
  • After three days, the tents were finally comfortable enough to sleep in.
  • On the muddy roadway, a few empty vodka bottles were found.
  • Tolland, Connecticut-based Asplundh Line Construction manager Brian Skorupski had just arrived with a truckload of 50 employees who were come to assist with the restoration of electricity.
  • Skorupski is accustomed to living in his suburban home.

According to him, “the only thing worse than this is sleeping in your vehicle.” Martin Howell and Vicki Allenfore did the editing for this publication. -phone -onlyfor-tablet-portrait-upfor-tablet-landscape-upfor-desktop-upfor-wide-desktop-up

Understand the Taliban Takeover in Afghanistan

One of the reasons is the absence of information. On Friday, news was seeping outside the heavily guarded hamlet that the Department of Human Services planned to relocate inhabitants to the racing clubhouse on Saturday. Photographs of individuals huddled under blankets and parkas inside the tents went viral in the media after they were posted on social media. However, no one inside the tent city, which has space for thousands of people but was only housing a few hundred on Friday, had heard anything about a relocation – or about anything else.

  • Sabol, who is unemployed and whose rental house was destroyed by the hurricane, recalls being awakened up on Wednesday morning in the shelter she was staying in at Toms River High School, where she had been since the storm hit.
  • Sabol had half an hour to pack before the ship arrived.
  • Worse still, the Nor’easter snow storm that hit the region this week was increasing strength, pelting the bus with wind and rain.
  • The passengers were anticipating a hotel with air conditioning and perhaps even a restaurant.
  • They were given sheets, a rubbery cushion, a cot, and one blanket to use within.
  • Because Sabol’s cot was close to the tent flaps, the wind whipped snow and slush into her face.
  • Her hands became a deep shade of purple.
  • Power workers from out of state who are assisting local utilities in restoring power to the region were also beginning to set up camp in the tent city.
  • There were now many more males than women or children, and the ladies claimed it was hard not to notice the leering of some of the guys.
  • Skorupski is accustomed to his suburban home.

Having a king-sized bed with Hotel Collection sheets made him long for home. As he said, “the only thing worse than this is sleeping in your vehicle.” Martin Howell and Vicki Allenfor the purpose of editing -phone -onlyfor-tablet-portrait-upfor-tablet-landscape-upfor-desktop-upfor-wide-desktop-up

What Life Is Like for Afghan Refugees at NJ’s ‘Liberty Village’

As more than 13,000 Afghan refugees awaited permanent resettlement in various parts of the United States by late October, a massive military installation in the Pine Barrens began to take shape, with a population greater than many towns in the state of New Jersey. Refugees began arriving at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in late August, as part of a frenzied airlift from Kabul during the United States’ departure from Afghanistan. The base is located in the geographic middle of the state of New Jersey.

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They have been kept in barracks and big tents commonly used for military deployments in New Jersey, where they have largely slept on bunk beds, according to Air Force Captain Sarah J.

According to her, the idea was “to make it seem as much as possible like a location our visitors may call home for a short period of time.” According to the Department of Defense, approximately 2,000 service members were assigned to the operation at the Joint Base, which has been dubbed “Liberty Village” and is one of eight military installations around the country that have hosted tens of thousands of Afghan refugees since the airlift began in October 2001.

  1. The Afghan resettlement project received more than $1.5 billion in funding from the federal government, making it one of the largest such initiatives in at least a generation.
  2. Following the 1956 revolution, around 30,000 Hungarians entered the United States through McGuire Air Force Base, and 4,000 ethnic Albanians fleeing Kosovo were accommodated at Fort Dix in 1999.
  3. Today, federal and state authorities are working together with nonprofit organizations and individuals to complete the task.
  4. In addition to meeting urgent needs such as winter jackets, diapers, and strollers, many of New Jerseyans stepped forward to assist with the more complicated chores of finding homes and employment for the refugees.
  5. “I believe people felt that because God had placed them so near to us, it was our responsibility to do what we could,” she adds.
  6. Many of the refugees worked with the United States in Afghanistan and are fluent in English, while others are fluent in Dari (the Afghan version of Farsi) and Pashto, among other languages.
  7. Tea is an important component of Afghan culture and family life.

Many refugees, while grateful for their safe arrival, have become disappointed, according to aid workers, as they wait for the immigration and work authorization documents, as well as the resources, that would allow them to establish permanent status in the United States.

“Everyone’s journey has been shocking and unexpected,” says Alain Mentha, executive director of Welcome Home International.

“For families living in refugee camps, the first several months are an emotional rollercoaster ride.” The length of time spent on the base has varied.

Refugees are allowed to leave the base provided all of the necessary documentation, background checks, and health examinations have been completed for them.

The refugees are provided with some federal monetary support to help them pay for rent, food, and travel expenses.

Refugees may also be eligible for additional federal benefits, such as Medicaid, food stamps, and job training, as well as state-sponsored assistance programs.

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They’ll need to learn English, obtain driver’s licenses and employment, enroll in school, and become acclimated to the variances in cultural practices.

According to Johnson, around 2,800 Afghan refugees had been relocated from the Joint Base Lewis-McChord by the middle of November.

The vast majority of people who have left the base have relocated to other parts of the nation, where they may have relatives or where the cost of living is less expensive than it is in their home state.

On the state level, various agencies and some individual sponsors are involved in the resettlement process in New Jersey.

According to Mentha, a number of families will relocate to Jersey City, while others will go to the Paterson and Elizabeth neighborhoods.

Welcome baskets are being assembled by the local mosque.

Katryna Novelozo, a Marine veteran, has arranged recreational events for some of the estimated 3,000 youngsters who live on the installation.

Volunteering at Liberty Village has helped me to get some perspective.

“It assisted me in realizing that this is the beginning of the next chapter in our relationship.” Patricia Alex is a writer who previously worked as a reporter and editor at The Record in Bergen County, New Jersey.

She received her MFA from Columbia University. To leave a comment, please visit this page.

‘Tent City’ in NJ where refugees from Afghanistan wait to start a new life

The most recent news from across the world Refugees from Afghanistan are camped out in New Jersey’s ‘Tent City,’ waiting to begin their new lives. Liberty Village is the name given to a tent city that expanded to have the population of more than half of the cities in New Jersey in a matter of hours. Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, a military base in central New Jersey where around 8,500 Afghans who have been displaced by the longest war in American history are temporarily residing, is a large area filled with it.

The new immigrants will eventually be relocated to communities around the country as part of one of the most significant resettlement projects undertaken in the United States in decades.

For the time being, the majority of them are simply awaiting the next stage in their voyage.

Ultimately, Mr.

According to a military analysis, certain evacuation sites might be out of commission for up to a year due to a variety of factors including an estimated rise in wastewater and generator usage, as well as how population expansion could affect a vulnerable bat species that may be found in the vicinity.

  1. a non-profit rehabilitation group in Jersey City has put up interim lodging in a church rectory and is preparing to transfer a family of six into a three-bedroom apartment next week.
  2. Also planned for early October is a second family visit by Mr Mentha’s group and his wife.
  3. In 1999, around 4,000 former Kosovo inhabitants sought asylum in the country after fleeing war in the Balkans.
  4. In regards to the base’s new occupants, Mr.
  5. Meetings in the manner of town halls are held on a regular basis at the camp, which is separated into three villages.
  6. Mr Khan, who has spent the past year working for a private company providing assistance to US special forces in southern Afghanistan, claims to be proficient in Pashto.
  7. He credited his volunteer support group for organizing the event.
  8. According to Mr Khan, “this is all part of our morale-boosting program.” “I’m listening to music.
  9. Just when they were about to be evacuated.
  10. Reporters from the media are not permitted to work on the base.
  11. An additional source of aid comes from the New Jersey Department of Health and Military Affairs, which is working as part of a task group established by Governor Philip D.

Murphy. Children spend their time playing football or volleyball, as well as doing crafts, according to visitors. Some individuals choose to take language classes. A tent is used as a mosque, with distinct parts for men and women to pray in different areas.

Understand the Taliban’s takeover in Afghanistan

Card 1 of a total of 6 What is the Taliban’s identity? The Taliban rose to power in Afghanistan in 1994, after the upheaval that followed the Soviet exit from the country in 1989. In order to enforce their regulations, they resorted to cruel public penalties including as lashing, amputations, and even mass killings. Here’s additional information about their history as monarchs, as well as their genesis myth. “What I discovered while wandering around was a sense of thankfulness,” Mr. Menendez explained.

  1. Murphy’s aides stated that three rehabilitation agencies will be in charge of collaborating with local community organizations to locate permanent homes for around 535 people in New Jersey, according to the governor.
  2. Interfaith Rise in Highland Park and Church World Service in Jersey City are among the organizations that will assist newly arriving Afghans in settling here.
  3. The intake form, which was created to deal with the huge amount of interest exhibited by volunteers, declares that donations to Aadhaar have reached “capacity” and cannot be accepted any further.
  4. Mr Khan claimed he had recently been asked to provide bags and blankets, as well as five barber chairs, to assist in the cutting of thousands of people’s hair in a humanitarian crisis.
  5. Many resettlement authorities have stated that finding adequate and inexpensive homes for those who do not have employment or sufficient documents is the most difficult obstacle they have encountered.
  6. Ziv said.
  7. According to J.

On Twitter, Mr.

Lisa Watson and her husband, Nader Rezai, own two family rental houses in Jersey City, one of which is near Journal Square.

Watson learned of the Afghans’ arrival at the military post, she contacted Welcome Home to let them know she had a three-bedroom apartment available and was prepared to lease it for a price that was somewhat below market value.

Then she realized she had a solution: “I see something I can do about it.” Then I thought to myself, ‘Let me just dip my toe in the water.'” The Afghan family who lives in the flat has four children ranging in age from 5 to 14 years old, all of them are fluent in English.

He did not want to be recognized out of fear for the safety of relatives who were still alive.

The Afghan city of Kabul is where you’ll find me.

They are so eager, he explained, that they must begin hunting for permanent employment immediately in order to receive permission. According to Mr Menendez, “There will undoubtedly be doors open for many of these immigrants.” TentCityrefugeesAfghanistanwaitstartlife

About the author

The Joint Base McGuire-Dix-LAKEHURST is a joint military installation in the United States. According to a military estimate, up to 9,500 Afghan refugees might settle in the United States for a year. In accordance with the assessment, the refugees would take up residence in existing and temporary buildings at the South Jersey facility, which would include a vast “tent city” on a 24.6-acre parade field at Fort Dix. According to the paper, which is a draft evaluation of the plan’s environmental effect, the immigrants, who are designated as Afghan Special Immigrants, would dwell “inside the Burlington County section” of the base’s 42,000-acre footprint.

  • Earlier: The Defense Department said that Afghan refugees were being airlifted to a location in South Jersey.
  • As of Thursday, some migrants have already arrived at the facility, which stretches into Ocean County, according to Derek VanHorn, the installation’s public affairs officer.
  • More information:how Here’s you can help with Afghan refugee relief in New Jersey and other parts of the country.
  • As reported by the New York Times, the refugee population on the Doughboy Parade Grounds might number more than 4,500 individuals who will be housed in a complex of 378 tents, each of which can accommodate up to a dozen people.
  • According to the study, temporary shelters would be powered by electric generators and would have access to showers and toilets.
  • According to the article, refugees would be able to stay at the facility for a minimum of six months and as long as a year.
  • Because of the serious nature of the increasing security and instability in Afghanistan, shelter places for (refugees) and U.S.
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Other sites on the base were ruled out for a number of reasons, according to the report, including the state of the buildings, their distance from air terminal facilities, and their “proximity to private houses or schools.” “Several open areas, including the former site of Walson Hospital in the Dix area and undeveloped land in the Lakehurst area of (the base) were eliminated from consideration because they did not meet the screening criteria,” according to the report.

  1. “The former site of Walson Hospital in the Dix area and undeveloped land in the Lakehurst area of (the base) were eliminated from consideration because they did not meet the screening criteria,” the report stated.
  2. Due to “the urgency and time sensitive nature of the plan,” it solicited feedback from the public and from government agencies by Saturday, Aug.
  3. The military post in South Jersey is one of four military locations in the United States that are being utilized to house refugees.
  4. Carol Comegno, a staff writer at the New York Times, contributed to this article.

Jim Walsh is a reporter for the Courier-Post, the Burlington County Times, and the Daily Journal, where he covers public safety, economic development, and other topics. Subscriptions to local journalism help to keep the lights on in the community.

Here’s where 11,000 Afghan refugees are staying in New Jersey

Published at 11:41 a.m., with an update.

What is Liberty Village?

Freedom Village, a part of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst where Afghan refugees await permanent relocation in the United States, was visited by Fox 5 New York and other news organizations. THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY- Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, located in Central New Jersey, is temporarily housing 11,000 Afghan refugees. The military facility, which is the largest in the country, is one of seven that house Afghan refugees around the country. For every adult refugee, there are 40 for every one refugee under the age of fourteen.

  • It consists of three settlements in total.
  • There are 19 tents in village number three.
  • According to Air Force Staff Sergeant Javad Javid, “we assist them in understanding the new norm that they will encounter here in the United States of America.” The migrants are learning how to live in America, which includes learning English and being familiar with American cash.
  • On the website, you may also get legal materials.
  • Officials claim that everyone who is eligible for the COVID-19 vaccination has gotten at least one dose of the vaccine.
  • She and her mother, along with four other members of her family, arrived to the base in October.
  • The American and Afghan flags are depicted together in one of her pieces of art.

According to her, who spoke via a translator, “the previous 47 days have been fantastic.” Khairi has stated that she now has lofty ambitions.

“I have a book of dreams in my head, just like every other Afghan girl,” Khairi explains.

The Air Force of the United States of America airlifted her from Kabul.

She claims that the most difficult aspect has been leaving them all behind.

“It’s the most difficult aspect when you believe you are safe here but not your family.” She claims to be suffering from depression, but she says she keeps herself occupied as a volunteer English instructor and translator at Liberty Village in New York City.

Meanwhile, officials expect a second wave of migrants to arrive at the military post on Sunday, according to reports. The objective is to have everyone relocated by February 2022, but authorities have told FOX 5 News that it may take longer than expected.

Afghan evacuees adjusting to new lives in New Jersey

PEMBERTON, New Jersey (WPVI) – PEMBERTON, New Jersey (WPVI) – In order to acclimate to their new life, hundreds of Afghan youngsters are studying English, which is the first step in that process. It’s all taking place in a structure that was formerly used for training by United States military personnel. They are among the temporary inhabitants of Liberty Village, which is located on the grounds of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Air Base in Pemberton, New Jersey, and houses a variety of military families.

A total of three communities have been established on the site, with Afghan Refugees strolling through each of them.

Others have worried expressions on their faces as they try to figure out what they should do next in their new life.

Gen.

Moreover, “Better Every Day” is the slogan of Liberty Village, according to him.

The majority of them (40 percent) are children under the age of 14.

Single men and women are housed separately from one another in order to account for cultural differences in living arrangements.

It was the same for all of them when they arrived on this base: they were escorted inside a clean, well-organized structure and routed through a series of stations for a processing procedure that might take anywhere from one to three hours.

The base continues to provide COVID tests to refugees, with an estimated positive rate of fewer than 1 percent.

some of which came from folks in our community.

I went on a tour of Liberty Village, which is located on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst and serves as a temporary housing facility for refugees awaiting resettlement.

• TaRhonda Thomas (@TaRhondaThomas)November 30, 2020 Upon arrival in Liberty Village, the refugees are subjected to a security screening process before being granted permission to move to safe havens.

Because of the Taliban’s takeover of Kabul, Dr.

According to Sharifi, “I was hiding because it was too unsafe for me to go outdoors.” For the last 15 years, he has worked directly with the United States Navy to provide assistance to American soldiers in Afghanistan.

She recalls seeing Taliban militants beat and shock people on the streets of Kabul using electric equipment, and she believes she was there herself.

“When I arrived at the base, I had the impression that this is where I could relax,” she stated.

Americans oversaw the construction of a full hamlet from the ground up, with rows of tent-like structures equipped with all of the comforts of a doctor’s office and other amenities.

On the grounds of Liberty Village, around 100 children have been born.

According to Air Force 2nd Lt.

There are military members and civilians living in the villages, and they work as translators for the diverse range of languages spoken in different parts of Afghanistan.

“They’re constantly requesting lollipops,” Dunaway explained.

People who have arrived in the villages with money have the option of making purchases in the surrounding districts as well.

People from all around the country, including the Philadelphia region, give clothing to the organization.

Officials suggest that the best way to learn about ways to give is to visit the website.

Every week, one to two groups of refugees arrive in Liberty Village for resettlement.

Next week’s cohort of students is scheduled to arrive on Sunday.

Some of the Afghans who were relocated in the United States were already citizens of the United States or had relatives in the United States, and so did not require transportation to safe haven sites.

Approximately 83,000 Afghan refugees have been allowed into the United States to far.

While they wait to be relocated, the refugees attend job fairs, participate in leisure activities, enroll in English lessons, and even engage in art therapy to help them cope with the trauma they have experienced.

The situation will be OK,'” said Senior Airman Monica Alvas, who is a member of the Air Force Reserve.

It’s a very different way of life from what they were used to in Afghanistan.

“You’ve been noticed,” Hussainzada said. “People are aware of your presence. People are interested in what you have to say. They are interested in how you are feeling. They are concerned.” WPVI-TV retains ownership of the copyright until 2022. All Intellectual Property Rights are Reserved.

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