How To Pack Up A Tent

How to Pack a Tent

Getting a tent back into its bag is not difficult once you are familiar with the process. The procedures shown below demonstrate how to efficiently pack a tent and all of its components. The imagery depicts what we do not want to see. There is an additional layer of space taken up by a separate fly from the remainder of the tent, and everything else is placed inside the bag. According to a friend of mine, this is how it was brought to me.

Step 1: Packing Up the Fly

As shown in the second figure, straighten up the fly and then fold it lengthwise so that the exterior (the parts with guy ropes) is inside of the fold as shown in the first picture. With a little skill and the help of two persons, it is quite simple to sweep the fly off the built tent (after removing/unfastening all of the supports) and fold it lengthwise.

Step 2: Folding the Fly

Make sure each end touches the nearest support before continuing to fold in toward the center. – One you’ve reached the middle, fold it over once more to seal it. If this stage is completed correctly, the fly should be the same width as any of the folded poles, as seen in the final figure. If this step is completed incorrectly,

Step 3: Rolling Up the Fly

Fold each end so that it touches the nearest supports, and then continue to fold in toward the center. To complete the fold, fold it over one more to reach the center. If this stage is completed successfully, the fly should be the same width as any of the folded poles, as seen in the last figure. If not, repeat the process.

Step 4: The Main Tent

The large tent has been set up in such a way that it appears to have been built. On the right-hand side of the photo, closest to the bins, is the front entrance. Make certain that all zips, including those on the windows, are closed.

Step 5: Adjusting the Roof

Pull the canopy so that it lays level and is not too bunched up, using the center roof mounts, which can be either clips or tubes for the support rods, to do this. As indicated in the second photo, make sure the front door is flat and that any extra hangs over the back door. If you have a dome tent that does not have a vestibule, work in a circular motion, pulling each side tight before ending with the front of the tent. It is really beneficial to have the tent still tied down at this point.

Step 6: Folding the Vestibule

If your tent includes a vestibule at the front or back, fold it over so that it sits flat against the main body of the tent. Check to see that the front one is on top.

Step 7: Folding the Tent

The front and rear vestibules of your tent should be folded over so that they are flush with the main body of your tent. Make sure the front one is on top of the stack of papers.

Step 8: Putting It All Together

Everything should be set up at the front of the tent, starting with the fly and working your way back. Poles, pegs, and any other accessories should be placed towards the back of the tent. Roll the fly in completely first, then add the poles and roll it again (a half turn works here to keep it in place) Roll it again once you’ve added the pegs.

Add whatever extra you like and roll it all the way up to the end, tying it off. It is critical to roll the tent securely because if there is too much air in the tent after it has been wrapped, it will not fit inside the bag.

Step 9: Put It in the Bag and Do It Up

That’s all there is to it.

Be the First to Share

To properly pack away your tent, whether you’re about to leave on a vacation or returning from one, you must first learn how to set up your tent correctly. Expeditions, festivals, the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, or simply a camping trip, tents come in a variety of forms and sizes, and each has its unique knack for putting them away. As a result, you must take care while packing your tentaway, or you may find yourself regretting your decision on your next vacation. Winfields Outdoors has put together this guide on putting away a tent to assist you.

Ensure that your tent survives the test of time no matter where you go by paying attention to each of these factors.

Why is it so important to pack your tent away properly?

Simply said, if you don’t properly store your tent, when you go to retrieve it for next year, it may be damaged or have other difficulties that are too late to be repaired before the next season begins. It is possible that whatever issues that your tent has when it is put away will still be present, and that it may even have developed new ones throughout the process of packing it away. More information may be found at: When it comes to camping, it is critical to thoroughly inspect your tent. So, what is the proper method of putting it away?

Dry your tent before it’s packed away

In the United Kingdom, if you’ve gone camping, there’s a good possibility you’ve seen a little amount of rain throughout your camping trip. If you were very unlucky, you may have even had to pack up your tent in the rain, which is never a pleasant experience. If you keep your tent in its bag after it has been wet, there is a significant risk that it will be coated with mould or mildew when you take it out of the bag the following day. Consequently, if you pack your tent away damp, you must dry and air it out as quickly as possible once you return home.

Also, make sure that the entire tent is dry, including locations such as the pegging points and guy lines.

Check for rips, tearsbreaks

Even if you’ve spent your camping trip in the United Kingdom, there’s a good possibility you’ve experienced some rainfall. The worst case scenario would be that you had to pack up your tent in the rain, which is never a pleasant experience. If you keep your tent in its bag after it has been wet, there is a significant probability that it will be coated with mould or mildew when you take it out of the bag the next time. In order to avoid this, you should thoroughly clean the tent before packing it away.

Also, make sure that the entire tent is dry, including locations such as the pegging points and guy lines. If you’re sitting there recalling that your tent was damp, go ahead and unpack it and dry it out again.

Fold or roll your tent properly

Although it may be tempting to just stuff your tent into its bag, doing so would cause more harm than good. You might end up damaging both the tent and the bag, which would need the purchase of a whole new tent. It may also alter the natural form of the tent, making it more difficult to set up the next time it is pitched.

Bag pegs and poles

Your tent pegs and poles should each come with a little bag in which to store them, and this bag is there for a reason: it keeps them organized. Make sure to put all of your pegs and poles (as well as anything else that could be a little pointy) in their proper bags, otherwise they may cause harm to your tent when it’s time to pack it up. You don’t want to penetrate the tent after thoroughly inspecting it or after purchasing it brand new. If you can’t find the bags, use whatever you have on hand to wrap them up and protect your tent from the sharp edges of the sharp spikes.

How to care for a tent – Tent Tips

  • Make sure to open up your tent and let it air out for a couple of hours before putting it down. You’ll need to sweep and clean the interior of your tent to remove any debris, dust, and filth that has collected within. Keep the tent doors slightly open while folding it up to allow for some air to flow through
  • Don’t completely close the tent doors when folding it up. Campers’ best friend is duct tape, so make sure you have some on hand for mending holes or tiny tears, as well as for securing poles until you can acquire a replacement. Footprints: a groundsheet that may be removed to protect the underside of your tent from damp ground or debris
  • In the event of a leaky seam, just cover it with sealant and allow it to soak into the material
  • Seam sealant When storing the tent, avoid laying it on its side since this might cause damage to the poles. Instead, lie it level.

More information may be found at: Best Way to Waterproof a Tent. If you can’t find the bags, use whatever you have on hand to wrap them up and keep them safe while you search for them. Take a look at our whole array of tent accessories or our entiretents collection, which includes: Large Tents|Family Tents|Polycotton Tents|Tents by Brand|Tents by Size To get you ready for 2020, check out more articles on theWinfields Blog. Don’t forget to check out our camping blog for more articles like this.

Tent Packing: Stuff, Roll, Or Fold?

Purchases of $100 or more at the Outside Shop, where you’ll discover gear for all of your outdoor excursions, will earn you $50 off your purchase. Sign up for Outside+ as soon as possible. A perplexing decision must be made at the conclusion of every outdoor adventure: whether to stuff, roll, or fold your tent into its stuffsack. If you poll your fellow hikers, you’ll find that everyone has a preferred strategy and a compelling argument for why theirs is the best. If you challenge them, you may find yourself with a tent pole in your eye.

  1. However, much of our thinking is illogical (with the exception of one staff member who claims to split his decision into three categories: 70 percent stuff, 25 percent roll, and 5 percent fold—depending on the tent).
  2. went straight to the source, asking tent manufacturers from every major brand both what they recommend and what they do themselves in terms of design and construction.
  3. When it comes to their personal lives, though, even tent makers are prone to laziness and just slack off: Big Agnes (also known as “Big Agnes”): When I’m backpacking, I’ll cram the tent with all of my belongings.
  4. When I’m vehicle camping, I lightly fold my clothes before rolling them.
  5. Kelty/SD: It is more convenient to roll my own tent since it takes up less space in my bag (and looks a little nicer when set up) and because I am a tent man (and I want my tent to look beautiful!).
  6. My tents are typically rolled, but if they are damp or I am in a hurry, I will fill them instead.
  7. It’s more convenient, quicker, and – most crucially – better for the tent’s longevity.

Once I’ve finished cleaning and putting the tent away, I roll. What are your thoughts? Are you a stuffer, a roller, a folder, or something else? Tell us what you think in the poll, and then explain why in the comments! T. Alvarez, author of the Explore-It Blog

How To Roll Up A Tent . And Get it Back In The Bag

The Outside Shop, where you’ll discover equipment for all of your outdoor excursions, is offering a $50 discount on any qualified $100 purchase. Outside+ is available to you right now. At the end of every outdoor expedition, you’re faced with an incomprehensible decision: should you stuff, roll, or fold your tent into its stuffsack? If you poll your fellow hikers, you’ll find that everyone has a preferred strategy and a compelling argument for why theirs is the most effective. A tent pole in the eye might result from challenging them.

  • However, much of our reasoning is illogical (with the exception of one member of staff who claims to split his decision into three categories: 70 percent stuff, 25 percent roll, and 5 percent fold—depending on the tent) and hence unscientific.
  • Ryan Dionne of Explore It!
  • Considering that the tents are shipped to you pre-rolled from the factory, most experts advocate rolling to conserve room in your backpack.
  • Big Agnes, thank you for your time and consideration.
  • Poles and stakes are normally packed separately from the tent when I travel with them.
  • I loosely fold everything and then wrap it up tightly.
  • Kelty/SD: It is more convenient to roll my own tent since it takes up less space in my bag (and looks a little nicer when set up) and because I am a tent man (and I like my tent to look beautiful!).

My tents are typically rolled, but if they are damp or I am in a hurry, I will fill them instead.

It’s more convenient, quicker, and – most crucially – better for the tent’s structural integrity.

Following cleaning and putting away the tent, I roll up my sleeves and go home.

Is it your nature to suffocate, roll, or fold documents?

Explore-It Blog by Ted Alvarez

  1. Get $50 off a purchase of $100 or more at the Outside Shop, where you’ll discover gear for all of your outdoor excursions. Sign up for Outside+ as soon as you can. A perplexing decision must be made at the conclusion of every outdoor adventure: do you stuff, roll, or fold your tent into its stuffsack? If you poll your fellow hikers, you’ll find that everyone has a preferred approach and a justification for why theirs is the greatest. If you disagree with them, you may find yourself with a tent pole in your eye. According to an informal poll conducted at the BACKPACKER office, 87.5 percent of us support stuffing. However, much of our thinking is illogical (with the exception of one member of staff who claims to split his decision into three categories: 70 percent stuff, 25 percent roll, and 5 percent fold—depending on the tent). “I stuff,” says one member of the team, “even though I’ve been taught it’s better to roll.” Ryan Dionne of Explore It! went straight to the source, asking tent manufacturers from every major brand both what they recommend and what they do themselves. Most experts advise rolling, pointing out that the tents are shipped from the factory already rolled and that rolling might help you save room in your backpack. When it comes to their personal lives, though, even tent makers become sluggish and give up: Big Agnes (pronounced “big agnes”): When I’m hiking, I’ll pack the tent with all of my belongings. It’s customary for me to pack the tent poles and pegs separately from the tent. When I’m vehicle camping, I lightly fold my clothes and then roll them. In the field, roll it up for storage. Kelty/SD: It is more convenient to roll my personal tent because it takes up less space in my bag (and looks a little nicer when put up). I am a tent man, therefore I want my tent to look beautiful! Mountain Hardwear recommends that you “roll” on a regular basis. My tents are typically rolled, but if they are damp or I am in a hurry, I will fill them. Nemo: I always pack my tents to the brim. It is more convenient, quicker, and – most importantly – better for the tent. Depending on the weather, I pack my North Face gear when I’m out hiking. Once I’ve finished cleaning and putting away the tent, I roll. How do you feel about it? Do you like to fill, roll, or fold? Tell us what you think in the poll, and then tell us why in the comments section! T. Alvarez, author of the Explore-It blog
See also:  How To Get Fresh Air Into Grow Tent

The tent is seen in its plastic bag, together with the tent poles and the inner tents, which are all contained within the main tent bag in the last photograph. Our rolled tent is normally kept in a separate bag from the inner tents so that we can get it out if it rains without getting the inside tents wet, but this illustration shows that it will all fit back into the tent’s original bag after it has been unrolled.

This is a really basic tip that is quite effective. Try it out and see how it works for you.

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Packing up a wet tent

This is by far the least enjoyable activity I can think of to perform when hiking. Most of the time, I like to leave the tent up overnight to allow it to dry out, but occasionally the rain continues to fall in the morning or there isn’t enough time to finish the job. Is there anyone who can give me some pointers on packing? What is your technique for keeping your wet fly apart from the rest of your gear? Do you roll it up, pack it in a separate sack, put it in outer mesh pockets, or something else?

  1. If you have not received an email from us or if you want a resend, please go to your User Profile page and let us know.
  2. When you go back, roll everything up and lay it out in the sun to dry.
  3. It is, without a doubt, the disadvantage of camping.- When I’m outside, I’m the most authentic version of myself.
  4. It all depends on how drenched my tent is!
  5. Washingtonian.
  6. I always keep one of those absorbent tiny multi-towels on hand to wipe off the tent poles and stakes before putting them back in their bags before leaving the campsite.
  7. I place such items in the tent stuff sack and stow it on the outside of my tent (either in the bottom attachment or side pocket) in a poor attempt to keep everything else from becoming soaked.
  8. What’s most essential is that as soon as I go home or to my next location, I put up the tent to allow it to dry.
  9. At REI, we think that spending time in nature is essential to living a fulfilling life.
  10. Place the fly first, followed by the towel, which will act as a barrier between the fly and the tent.
  11. All of this was completed last weekend in Red River Gorge in Kentucky.

I’m also a believer in the “wrap it up and roll it out later” philosophy. In addition, when I roll it back out to dry, it offers me an opportunity to get rid of any further sand, mud, or other debris when I return home. My shower curtain has also served as a drying rack on occasion.

How to Fold a Tent Like a Boss: Dome / Cabin (13 Tent Care Tips)

Putting the tent together is actually rather simple. Particularly popular are dome tents. Furthermore, getting them down is not too difficult. Putting them back in the bag, on the other hand, is a another matter. In this post, you’ll learn how to fold a tent like a pro – and how to put it back in its bag, just as you did when you first got it!

How to Fold a Tent Like a Boss

You’ve been out in the woods for some days now. You have become one with nature. You can’t recall the last time you cleaned your hair, and you get the distinct impression that you might want to stay here indefinitely. But then you remember the hair washing and how lovely it would be to take a hot shower instead. In addition, you have work the next day. Your food supplies have been reduced to a can of baked beans and an onion, among other things. It’s past time to leave. The tent remains in place as you pack up camp, fill up the garbage bags, and load the car.

Because it is the most inconvenient item to take apart.

No need to be concerned any longer, since I’m here to tell you that it doesn’t have to be this difficult.

The following are the four sections of this post:

  1. The two of you had been out in the woods for a few days. In the wild, you are one with nature. When was the last time you washed your hair? You have no idea, but you have the impression that you might want to stay here for the rest of your life. But then you remember the hair washing and how great it would be to take a shower instead of going outside. In addition, you have a job to go to on Monday. You’re down to a can of baked beans and an onion for sustenance, which is a little depressing. We need to get moving. However, the tent remains erected while you finish packing, filling the trash cans and loading the car. Why? Why? Because it is the most inconvenient item to remove. Upon arrival, this mystery piece of equipment is wonderfully packed into a small area
  2. The package exclaims, “packs so little!” and “so easy to assemble,” but when it comes time to disassemble it, it never quite fits, and you have no idea how it managed to get so compact in the first place! No need to be concerned any longer, since I’m here to tell you that things don’t have to be this difficult. Packing a tent of any size, shape, or kind is simple. Just follow these steps. The following are the sections of this post:

Is it a rainy day? How to put up your tent in the rain is demonstrated here.

How to Fold a Tent: 5 Steps

Tent folding is governed by a few fundamental rules that are generally applicable. These are the regulations that must be followed:

  1. Before packing the tent, clean it well and check that it is completely dry. The tent will become moldy if it is left damp for an extended period of time. If you must pack anything damp, make sure to unpack it as soon as you get at your destination and dry it out immediately. To make the tent fit into the bag, it must be folded down somewhat smaller than the bag. Tent poles should be rolled within the tent. Make use of a knot to keep the tent tightly coiled
  2. Remove bumps and wrinkles to reduce the amount of superfluous mass

How to Fold a Dome Tent: 11 Steps

A terrific no-fuss way to folding a dome tent is demonstrated by this Australian gentleman. He makes the valid point that if you have three distinct objects to put into a bag, it will be far more difficult to get them all to fit than if you put them all together. The procedure is outlined in detail below the video. You may see it on YouTube.

  1. Make sure the tent is clean: Empty the tent of all dirt, food, and other possessions to ensure that the tent is clean and clear of obstructions
  2. Remove any tent pegs that may have fallen to the ground: Ascertain that all of your tent pegs have been gathered and placed in their respective bags, and then place them in the pole bag. Remove the fly poles from the ground: Remove any poles from the flysheet and fold them up into the pole bag before continuing. Inside the tent, lay the flysheet out as follows: Check to see that the flysheet is dry and clean before laying it down as flat as possible on the inner floor of the tent
  3. Open all of the tent doors at the same time: This will guarantee that any air trapped within the tent will be released rather than trapped inside the tent. Take down all of the tent poles: Remove all of the poles from the ground and place them folded back into the pole bag. Fold the main tent as follows: Make sure that all of the tent’s components are contained within the primary perimeter. By now, you should have a square that contains both the flysheet and the tent structure itself. In a squat position, lean the pole bag against the edge of the tent, about equal lengths from either end. This will serve as a point of reference for you when determining where to fold your tent. Take one edge and fold it in so that it is in line with the edge of the tent pole bag. Repeat with the other edge. Once you’ve completed one edge, repeat the process on the other so that you have a long rectangular form that is no broader than the pole bag. Remove all of the air and flatten down the resultant shape: Ensure that the tent is as flat and neatly folded as possible by going over it and eliminating any wrinkles or air pockets. Incorporate the pole bag into the tent as follows: Starting at one of the tent’s ends, place the pole bag and begin to wrap the canvas up around it as tightly as you possibly can. Please make sure that you are rolling it in a straight line so that one end doesn’t end up being thicker than the other. You can utilize your body weight to roll tightly and eliminate air as you go
  4. However, this is not recommended. To bring everything together, say the following: Tie two lengths of rope around each end of the cylinder once it has been properly rolled (you should have some from original packing). The Australian gentleman proposes making loops at one end of each length of rope, then looping the other end through and pulling to give the rope more stiffness. Put everything in one place! It’s finished, just like that! The tent should be able to fit inside the bag without any difficulty

How to Fold a Cabin Tent: 10 Steps

Cabooses are usually extremely significant in size and construction. The majority of them feature a number of rooms and areas, and you can usually stand up straight in them. Because the bags are often tight and there is more stuff to squeeze back in, putting them back into their bags is a particularly difficult task. Doing so effectively and without errors is essential. You may see it on YouTube.

  1. Remove the stakes from the ground: Remove all of the stakes from the ground surrounding the tent so that the tent is no longer held in place by the stakes Remove the poles from the ground: Remove all of the tent poles from the tent’s main frame. Lay the tent out flat as follows: Make sure the tent is laid out flat on the ground and that it is either a square or a rectangle form, depending on your preference. When using a flysheet, be sure to keep it flat and clean when placing it within the form. Fold the tent in half as follows: Once you’ve smoothed out the tent, fold it in half over itself and store it away. Take some time here to iron out any kinks, air pockets, or other issues that may have arisen, and double-check that the tent is nice and level
  2. Fold the tent in half a second time: The tent should be folded in half again so that it is a long rectangular shape now, and once again you should take the time to level it out and clean it. Contrast the length of the storage bag with the length of the folded tent. The fact that the storage bag is the same length, if not slightly longer, as the short edge of the folded tent is amazing. If the tent is larger in length, you will have to think about folding it again. To achieve this, you should aim to have an atent that is almost the same length as the storage sack when it is folded. Fold the long rectangle in thirds as follows: Fold one-third of the tent over on itself to make it more compact. Tent poles should be rolled into the tent: Using your body weight to keep the roll extremely tight and smoothing out air pockets and uneven areas as you go, start at one end of the folded tent and work your way toward the other end. To keep the wrapped tent in place, knot the ends together as follows: Tie them together so that the roll remains securely coiled
  3. Place it in the bag as follows: If everything has been done correctly, the tent should be able to be packed up safely in its bag.

Do you require a tent? See our Ultimate Buyers Guide to the Best Family Camping Tents for more information.

13 Tent Care Tips

Let’s go through some fundamental tent maintenance guidelines. These suggestions will ensure that your tent has the longest possible life and that you do not have to run out and buy a new one every other summer. The absolute fundamental rules are as follows:

  1. Always read the instructions before doing anything: Despite the fact that tents have many similarities, they are all somewhat different, therefore it is vital to become familiar with your specific tent and to have the instructions close at hand. Use caution when working with zippers and poles: Considering that they are the most delicate parts of your tent, they should be handled with caution at all times. Once they have been destroyed or lost, they are extremely difficult to repair or replace
  2. When dismantling poles, begin at the centre and work your way out: This ensures that tensions are distributed uniformly along the rope. Maintain the cleanliness of your tent and ensure that it is dry while not in use: Although it should go without saying, dirt and dampness may lead to mold, and mold is a negative thing. Mold is something you do not want. It has a foul odor and can be hazardous to your health
  3. It should be avoided. When you return from a trip, make sure to thoroughly air dry your tent: Even if the tent has not been wet, it is still a good idea to do this at the conclusion of every trip to ensure that the tent is completely dry
  4. Consider keeping your tent in a more flexible container at your residence: Although it is crucial to keep the tent in its bag for excursions, consider storing it in a bigger container at home, such as a pillow case, to enable air to circulate through the fabric while it is being kept to prevent mildew growth. Check to see that it is not being stored in a wet or moist environment. Never wash your tent in the washing machine: It is necessary to clean it, but this should be done with a sponge and some mild soap rather than in the washing machine. This will cause the material’s critical coatings to break down. Check the waterproofing and make any necessary repairs: Over time, the waterproofing of your garments may become weakened, particularly at the seams of your garments. You’ll need to figure out what kind of material your tent is composed of and then make the proper repairs. For polyurethane tents, a water-based seam sealer will be used, and for silicone tents, a silicone sealant will be used. If your tent has a little hole in it, you may also fix it with repair tape, just like you would a bike inner tube
  5. However, this is not recommended. Consider utilizing a footprint or tarp to protect your property: Even though tents are waterproof, if the weather is very rainy, a tarp beneath the tent will help to guarantee that your tent is not ruined by excessive water. It will also protect your tent from any stones or thorns that may penetrate your tent and cause it to become unusable as a result of the damage. As someone who has experienced this firsthand, I can assure you that it is not enjoyable, and you will not be aware of it until you are using your tent in really wet weather. Later, in the middle of the night, you will discover that all of your things, including your sleeping bag, have been saturated with water
  6. Stay away from leaving your tent set up in direct sunlight for an extended amount of time: UV radiation will degrade the fabric of your tent, causing it to deteriorate. Boots should be left outside the tent: It is possible for boots to contain foreign things that might puncture your tent, as well as dirt that can deteriorate it over time. Only wear socks or bare feet before entering your tent. Do not leave your dog unattended in the tent:I’m not sure what your dog is like, but mine likes to dig, roll, scratch, and do a variety of other things. you get the idea. Unsupervised, they may get up to anything, which could include causing damage to your camper’s canvas tent. It’s also a good idea to verify that their claws are cut short before you leave to reduce the likelihood of any punctures to your tent. Food and toiletries should be kept in a container with a tight fitting lid: Maintain a lockable receptacle on the outside of the tent or in the vestibule for any food or personal scent products you may bring. If you keep these kinds of objects in your tent, they may become too enticing for little (and large) animals, who may attempt to gnaw through your tent material in order to get to these items, leaving you with a hole in your tent (and an animal within it!)
See also:  How To Setup Carbon Filter In Grow Tent

Thank you to REI for providing some of the ideas for these suggestions. Additional reading: How to properly stake a tent

Your Turn

You should be able to go camping and amaze all of your friends with your tent folding abilities now that you have the information. There is nothing better than getting to the conclusion of a pleasant weekend knowing that you will not be forced to fight with your tent for an hour in order to get it back into its bag.

Now you can walk out into the wilderness (and inside whatever tent you may have) with the confidence that you will be able to get it back into its small, tiny bag if need be.

How To Pack A Tent for Backpacking The Right Way

It is possible that the information in the following article will be useful to you if you like camping, particularly those situations in which you will need to make a lengthy backpacking excursion into the wilderness. Backpacking is one of the most popular outdoor sports among outdoor enthusiasts all over the world. There is no other experience quite like slogging through the forest, but at the end of the day, you will undoubtedly need to set up camp and rest up in preparation for the remainder of your journey.

Tents, even the ultralight tents that are now being produced, may add a significant amount of weight to your pack.

Below, we will demonstrate two alternate approaches for packing a tent for hiking, with step-by-step instructions for each method.

Why Does a Tent Need to Be Packed Correctly When Backpacking?

If you appreciate the camping experience and enjoy hiking, it is likely that you will be walking about with a large backpack for a significant portion of the day. This sort of long-distance travel can rapidly become exhausting. The situation is exacerbated if you are backpacking with a bag that has been inadequately packed. In order to prepare for your camping vacation, it is critical that you become well-versed in the appropriate approach to pack one of the heaviest objects you will encounter: the tent.

Using the tips and guidelines we’ve provided below on how to pack a tent in your bag can help you avoid this situation and enjoy your next outdoor vacation to the fullest.

The inside approach and the exterior method, as previously stated, are the two primary methods for correctly packing a tent in or on a backpack.

Packing a Tent inside Your Backpack: The Interior Method

Using the first approach, you will physically load your tent into the internal compartment of your bag. To use this approach, you will first need to choose a backpack that has an internal frame that is built to fit your needs. Keep in mind that these types of backpacks are significantly more capacious than those that are created with an external frame. Packing your tent is made easier because of the additional room in the interior of the bag. It wasn’t long ago when external backpacks were the only thing you saw on the trails.

  1. Before making a final decision on your internal frame backpack, you should examine the size of your tent before making your final decision.
  2. If you already have a backpack and don’t want to spend the money on a new one, you may always opt to store your tent in a compression bag before you leave home.
  3. As soon as you’ve decided on your internal frame backpack, lay the tent out on the floor in a tidy and level manner.
  4. As you begin to roll up your tent, these poles will provide additional support for the structure.
  5. When doing so, make sure that the tent and the tent pole bag are properly aligned with one another.
  6. The pole bag will serve as both a support and a foundation for the tent that will be carried within the backpack.
  7. Once again, the tent pegs will offer additional support for the tent when it is rolled up and stored.

However, it is important to note that the tent must be rolled firmly and correctly at this point.

If possible, pack the tent while it’s not raining too hard.

Additionally, a damp tent can cause mildew and mold to grow throughout your bag.

Hikers are well aware that this is not always a simple operation, particularly when you have to recover a variety of objects throughout the course of a single day.

Your tent will normally be placed in the middle of the bag, between the things that are really heavy and those that are extremely light.

The tent can be stowed next to the sleeping bag, or as near to the middle as possible, if space is limited.

You should also think about the angle at which you will be packing.

Horizontal packing, on the other hand, allows for extra room in the bag to be used for additional things.

The exact angle at which you pack will be determined by the amount of stuff you need to transport. When camping, it is recommended that you carry no more than 30 percent of your body weight at any given moment, according to industry standards.

Packing a Tent Outside Your Backpack: The Exterior Method

The second and last option for packing a tent in a backpack is the outside approach, which consists of placing the tent on the outside of the bag and attaching it with a strap or straps. While the first approach necessitates the placement of the tent within the bag, which takes up a significant amount of room, the second way allows for more space to be used for other goods. Of course, if you choose this option, the first thing you’ll need to do is invest in a bag that has an exterior frame to keep your belongings safe.

  1. To load your tent into your bag using the external approach, you should begin by rolling it in the same manner that you would while packing it using the internal method.
  2. Closed loop ties are the finest option for securing the tent to the backpack frame once it has been put in place with rope.
  3. This adds an extra layer of protection to your tent and prevents it from falling off the frame during use.
  4. The tent will often be set up on the bottom half of the exterior structure to protect it from the elements.
  5. Walking is also made much easy from this stance.
  6. If you decide to use the external technique of packing a tent, you should be aware that there are several hazards associated with this method.
  7. Naturally, tents that have been stowed outside are far more vulnerable to harm from sharp items and twigs.
  8. However, while tents that are stored within your backpack provide peace of mind, tents that are attached to the exterior of your bag will always be a cause of stress as you make your way down the route.
  9. Due to this, you will need to make certain that your tent is well protected from the elements.
  10. When you combine that with the experience of having to put up a damp tent, it becomes evident that it is necessary to protect it.

To avoid this, try to store your tent in a zippered bag that is both waterproof and windproof. This will provide your tent an extra layer of protection when it is hanging outdoors on the exterior frame. top picture courtesy of NPS.gov

How to Pack a Tent in a Backpack

Specifically, I’m going to speak you how to pack a tent in a bag today. Even while you could just throw your tent in there and call it a day, taking the time to correctly pack your bag will result in a more pleasurable camping trip. Because your tent is usually one of your heaviest pieces of backpacking gear, correctly packing your tent not only prevents damage to the tent, but it also better distributes the weight, preventing your back from suffering from unnecessary strain and making the trip to your next campsite more pleasant.

Keep in mind to review ourbackpacking checklistfor additional packing suggestions!.

Here’s How to Pack a Tent in a Backpack

First and foremost, let’s talk about how to pack a tent inside the interior of your bag.

Pack in a Stuff Sack

A stuff sack may significantly reduce the size of your tent, allowing you to pack it more compactly and fit it into your backpack. The need for a waterproof model is critical, especially if you live in a wet climate as I do. Just remember to never store your tent in a stuff sack; instead, always keep it in a free-standing position in storage.

In the Middle, Against Your Back

When packing a tent in a backpack, the optimum spot to put it is in the middle, against your back. For the majority of hikers, this is the most comfortable way to carry large objects since it allows you to keep your weight balanced. I personally stow the tent body and rainfly inside my bag, but I lash the tent poles to the outside of my backpack to keep them from shifting about.

Consider Packing Loose

Ultralight backpackers should dispense with the use of a stuff sack entirely. Packing your tent loosely in your bag allows you to lose a little amount of weight. It also makes it possible to cram your tent in with additional belongings. It is recommended that you tie your tent poles to the exterior of your rucksack if you want to go this way. The disadvantage of this strategy is that there is a slight danger that your tent may become damaged while it is being transported in your bag.

Split Components with Partner

One of my most important backpacking tips for traveling with a companion is to divide the cost of your tent components between the two of you. Consequently, one of you will carry the tent body and rainfly, while the other will carry the poles and other accessories. It is important to note that technique only works if you want to sleep in the same tent.

Packing a Wet Tent

Unfortunately, sometimes you have to cram a dripping tent into a bag and call it a day. Try to dry out the tent as much as you can before putting it away for the night. Even a simple shake out or allowing it to dry for a few minutes may make a significant difference. It’s likely that you’ll have to pack a damp tent, but be absolutely certain that the tent is completely dry before storing it at home (you should always do this anyways).

Can You Attach a Tent to the Outside of a Backpack?

A tent may be attached to the exterior of your backpack rather than being carried inside. This helps to free up a lot of inner room in your bag, which you may use to store other items. However, this is an approach that I personally like to avoid. I just don’t want to take the chance of shredding or ripping my tent if it gets hooked on something while hiking. Having said that, it may be a good idea to store the tent poles on the exterior of your bag for convenience. These will not be harmed and are frequently difficult to keep in the confines of your pack.

In the event that you decide to pack your entire tent on the outside of your bag, you’ll want to experiment with several placements to determine which one works best for you.

It is even possible for some travelers to fix their tent in a vertical fashion to the middle of the exterior of their rucksack!

Some hiking backpacks are equipped with straps that allow for this approach to be used. It doesn’t matter which technique you choose, a waterproof stuff sack or storage sack is a requirement unless you are very certain that the weather will be dry.

My Favorite Backpacking Tents in 2021

Knowing how to properly pack a tent in a backpack is only useful to a certain extent. In addition, it’s critical that you bring the proper tent, preferably one that is particularly made for backpacking. Quite simply, a backpacking tent weighs far less and packs down significantly smaller than a regular camping tent. On a backpacking trip, if you try to bring a standard camping tent, you’ll most likely find that it takes up much too much room in your bag (and seriously weighs you down to boot).

  1. This one-person tent is a cross between a camping tent and a bivy bag in that it can accommodate one person.
  2. Despite its compact size and low weight, this Snugpak tent is surprisingly large and highly sturdy, especially considering its small size.
  3. Both of these two-person tents are intended for use as a hiking companion.
  4. When camping in the rain, the full coverage rainflies are an excellent option since they provide plenty of vestibule room.

How to Pack Other Camp Shelters in a Backpack

A tent is not the only type of shelter you may bring with you on a hiking trip. Rather of using a tent while hiking on my own travels, I’ve begun to use a hammock instead, which I find to be more comfortable. The best camping hammocks are extremely compact and low in weight (typically much lighter than a one-person backpacking tent). They are also extremely compact due to the fact that they do not require the use of poles to put them up. While it’s important to choose a location that is suitable for hammock camping – you’ll need robust, evenly spaced trees to hang your hammock — this is presently my favorite backpacking shelter for visits in Washington’s Olympic National Park.

Please also see our complete packing list for hammock camping for more information (with setup tips).

They’re often even easier to pack into your bag than tents, owing to the fact that most of these camping shelters are lighter and pack down even smaller.

Other Tips for Packing a Backpacking Backpack

Packing a tent in your bag is only one step in the process of preparing your rucksack for a hiking trip. In order to make the most of your available space, uniformly distribute all of your gear, and ensure that your basics are easily accessible, it’s equally crucial to pack the rest of your camping gear neatly as well.

When packing, I prefer to divide my backpack into the following sections for ease of access:

  • Lower half — This is where I store all of the stuff that I won’t need until I reach camp. Consider the following items: camping shoes, sleeping garments, and inflatable sleeping mats. I also keep my sleeping bag in this pocket, despite the fact that some backpacks include a bottom section designed particularly for sleeping bags.
  • Middle — This is where I keep my heavier belongings, such as my tent, for easy transport. I normally keep my complete tent in this location, but it’s also customary to have only the body/fly in this location and the poles on the outside. Aside from that, I keep my bear canister (with food inside) and camping stove in the center of my pack.
  • This is where I keep my water filter, first aid kit, rain jacket, and toilet kit (see here for suggestions on how to go to the bathroom when hiking) at all times. The top of your backpack is ideal for storing items that you will likely require when hiking on the path during the day.
  • I put my phone and money in the most secure pocket I can find on my person. My keys are held in place by a key clip that is incorporated into the keyboard. In addition, I keep a GPS/satellite communicator, sunglasses, sunscreen, insect spray, and a headlamp in the pockets of my pants. Tiny goods like as lip balm, paper maps, a compass, and other small objects can be stored in this compartment. Of course, I always make sure to have lots of water (as well as a few high-calorie foods) on hand and immediately accessible.
  • Exterior — I usually attach my tent poles and closed-cell foam sleeping pad to the exterior of my bag to keep them from moving about inside. Hiking poles may be stored here while not in use, as can a backpacking chair if you’re planning on taking one.
See also:  How To Build A Platform For A Tent

Everyone who backpacks has their own favored manner of packing their belongings, and this includes me. With practice, you’ll be able to determine what works best for you and what doesn’t work. However, for those who are just getting started, the strategy outlined above is a solid beginning point.

Want More Backpacking Advice?

Check out our complete beginner’s guide to backpacking for even more information on how to organize a backpacking adventure. Our other backpacking resources include information on how to go hiking in the winter, how to go backpacking with a dog, and the best backpacking foods to eat. And, as usual, please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any more questions in the comments section below. Wishing you a safe and enjoyable journey!

How to Fold a Tent: A Complete Step-by-Step DIY Guide

Despite the fact that setting up a tent is as simple as ABC, folding it back into its bag may not be the same story. This is made considerably more difficult if you have never seen or misplaced the instructions for the tent before. Because of the tiny size of a tent, knowing how to fold one makes it much easier to transport it. Alternatively, see:Ultralight Hiking Equipment: For a Stress-Free, Lightweight Hike A tent that has not been folded correctly creates an ideal environment for mold growth.

To fold your tent, you will need the following items:

  • Washing rags for use in cleaning the tent
  • A sleeping bag for the night
  • The twine that will be used to bind the tent together

Steps to effectively folding a camping tent

Camping necessitates the transportation of a large number of items for usage in the wild. They are usually kept in the tent when not being used. As a result, the first step will be to remove everything from the tent and then, using a clean wet rag, clean the interior of the tent’s interior. Remove any food particles or anything else that might serve as a breeding ground for mould by cleaning the area thoroughly. After you are finished cleaning the inside of the tent, move on to the outside of the tent and repeat the process.

It is preferable to let it air dry.

Make assured that everything is completely dry before proceeding.

Remove the stakes or pins holding the shelter

Having cleaned and dried your tent, it’s time to remove the pins that hold it to the ground. Remove the pins from the tent’s corners. Place the pins or stakes in a separate bag or in your backpack so that they are easily accessible. Keep the stakes in a different location from where you are keeping the tent, but not in the same location as where you are storing the tent because this may result in damage to the tent’s fabric. This is due to the fact that the pins and stakes are sharp objects that might cause damage to your tent.

Remove the poles

This is so simple that even a 6-year-old can do it. All that is required is that you remove the poles out of the loops in your tent.

After that, fold the poles in the appropriate manner. Some tent poles are made up of several parts that may be joined together to form lengthy poles. If this is the situation with your poles, remove the segments that are affixed to the poles and store them in their pole bag.

Shake up the camping tent

Cleaning up the tent may not always imply that you are finished. As amusing and strange as it may sound, you must pick up your tent and shake it well before using it. The only reason for doing this is to clear away any debris that may have accumulated on the tent.

Make the tent flat

The next step is to put the tent on the ground once you have finished cleaning it. Pull the tent all the way down to the ground until it is completely flat. Check to see that the tent’s bottom is likewise dry before proceeding. If it is not completely dry, wipe away the excess moisture with a small piece of fabric and let it aside to dry for around 20 minutes.

Fold up the tent

You must be really focused at this phase in order to fold the tent properly and into extremely little pieces. To begin, elevate the outside pieces of the tent and bring them closer to the center of the tent. The folds should be positioned in a straight line from top to bottom. Important to remember is that you should fold the tent longitudinally rather than widthways. When folding the tent, be sure that the tent’s door is on top of the fold. Fold the tent so that it is just a fraction of its original width dimension when it is not in use.

In order to avoid this, you must pat the inside of your already folded tent to verify that no air is trapped within it.

Pack up the fly

Now that you’ve finished working on the main tent, you’ll need to straighten the fly and fold it lengthwise so that the outside portion of the fold is within the fold. This is something that two people should have no trouble putting together.

Folding the fly

Take care to carefully fold the ends of the fly, making sure they meet the nearest supports, and then continue folding it towards the center. When you have reached the middle, fold the flyover once more.

Put everything together

Place everything out in front of the tent, starting with the fly nearest to you and working your way out to the tent poles, pegs, and anything else that is farthest away. Before you do anything, you must completely roll in the fly, insert the tent poles, and roll it again. Put the pegs back in and roll it up once more. Incorporate any remaining ingredients and roll till the finish, tying it properly at the end. When rolling the tent, make sure to roll it firmly since allowing too much air inside the tent can cause issues when folding, as the tent may not fit into the bag.

Put the tent in the bag

Having carefully folded your tent and stowed away all of your belongings, there isn’t much more left to do except put your tent in a bag and wait for the next camping trip, whether it’s with your friends or by yourself. When it comes to folding a normal tent, the methods outlined above are the most basic. Tents, on the other hand, come in a variety of styles. The following are the procedures to folding some of the most common tents available on the market:

Folding a Cabin Tent

A cabin tent is fairly large and can accommodate groups of up to ten individuals.

While putting it together may not be difficult, getting it inside the tent bag is a different story entirely. If it is not folded correctly, it may not fit properly in the bag. Several factors should be taken into consideration when folding a cabin tent:

  • Remove moisture and dirt from the fabric by wiping it on both the inside and outside of the cloth. Take down the tent poles and pegs
  • The tent should be laid down level on the ground in the shape of a square or rectangle. In order to prevent lumps from forming, fold the tent in half and ensure that the tent is entirely flat. Fold the tent in half once more to create a rectangle that is longer than it is wide. Confirm that the tent bag is the correct length. If the width of your tent after it has been folded is more than the length of the bag, you will need to fold the tent again. Begin by folding the tent in half, starting from the narrow end, and putting it in the bag.

Folding a Backpacking Camping Tent

This tent is a favorite of individuals who want to travel light while camping. So that’s how you fold a backpacker camping tent, step by step.

  • The tent should be cleaned and dried thoroughly to guarantee there is no mold growth and that it does not have a foul smell
  • Whether it’s pins or stakes, Remove anything that has been used to secure the tent to the ground so that it may be moved. It is important to keep the pins and stakes in a different location from the tent bag in order to avoid ruining the fabric of the tent. Fold the tent poles after removing them from the loops. As long as the poles can be tied together or placed in a different bag all together, they should be OK
  • Otherwise, they should be stored separately. The tent should be shaken to get rid of any remaining dirt and to straighten the cloth. Place the tent on the ground so that the entryway is towards the top of the structure. Fold the bag in half starting from the sides and working your way towards the middle. Check to see that there is no air trapped in the folds or lumps of fabric. Roll inside the tent starting from the spot that is furthest away from the entrance. Finally, tie it securely and place it in the tent bag to finish it.

Folding a Dome Shaped Tent

In the event that you want a dome-shaped tent, here are some tips on how to fold this sort of tent.

  • Pack the flysheet in the trunk of the car. Before you do anything, make sure the flysheet is straight. Fold the fly in half lengthwise, with the outer section of the fly folded within the fly. Fold the fly in half lengthwise again, this time with the outside section facing inside. If you want to do it well, you can utilize a second hand. Fold the fly in half. Retuck the fly’s ends to the nearest pole, then collect the fly’s ends towards the center and fold it in once more. Repeat with the other fly. If everything is done correctly, the flysheet of each pole should be the same width. The fly is being rolled up. Begin by working your way up to the top of the fly, concentrating on the lightest section of it. Roll it up firmly and secure it with a knot. When folding the tent, the tighter the fly is, the simpler it is to fit it into the bag. The tent should be spread in the same manner as it was built. Make certain that all zippers are completed
  • Make the necessary adjustments to the roof part. The center roof mounts will serve as excellent support rods for the structure. Pulling the canopy can help to ensure that it is completely flat. Don’t be concerned about the surplus fabric. Simply place it over the area of the rear entrance and fold the vestibule down to the floor. Fold the vestibule so that it lies over the body of the tent, with the top portion of the vestibule resting on top. If your tent does not have a vestibule, you may skip this step and just fold the tent. Fold each edge of the tent towards the center, then fold it in half again to reduce the size of the tent to a quarter of its original size
  • Gather everything together. Place everything on the front section of the tent by first placing the fly sheet, poles, pegs, and any other items that you want to use in the tent. Adding one element at a time, rolling once, adding another and rolling again, and lastly rolling the end of the tent and tying it properly is the best way to go about this process. The tent should be rolled extremely tightly to eliminate unwanted wrinkles while folding and rolling, since any extra air will cause the tent to not fit in the bag.

Useful Tips When Folding a Tent

It is recommended to pay close attention to general instructions on how to fold your tent correctly. Here are a few pointers that are crucial.

  • Tents are available in a variety of sizes and from a variety of companies. It is also essential that you consult to your user’s handbook for instructions and information pertaining to your specific tent, in addition to the information provided on this page. Every tent features distinct fold lines that are visible at the time of purchasing. While folding your tent, make an effort to navigate your way through the creases and, if possible, discover the fold lines. Using this method will save you a lot of hassle and time. Clean your tent thoroughly and allow it to air dry to ensure a longer lifespan. Avoid lumps and creases that aren’t required in order to avoid gaining excessive weight. Make certain that no sharp things, such as pins, are stored with your tent in order to protect the fabric.

Importance of Knowing How to Pack Away a Tent

Those searching for something that can be put up quickly and will keep them comfortable during the night while they are out in the jungle will almost probably opt for something that will cost a significant amount of money. Tents are quite costly, and learning how to properly care for them will save you a significant amount of money in the long run. A tent that has not been properly tacked down is typically heavier and bulkier due to the fact that the weight has not been evenly distributed. Knowing how to pack away your tent will make it much easier to transport it whether you are trekking or going hiking.

Check out our study of the best ultralight tent for additional information on your alternatives.

Final thoughts

All campers must be able to pitch a tent, which is an essential skill. Spending the night in the woods with a bunch of friends is a great way to spend the evening. While the experience may not have been as warm and cozy as you would have liked, the memories made are ones that should be treasured. A large majority of campers are familiar with the feeling of having to pack up their tent. Typically, people collapse the tent and roll it inside the tent bag, however this never results in the tent bag fitting properly.

Check out our simple instructions on how to create a DIY camping tent for inspiration if you want to save even more money.

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